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Vol. 144, No. 35 — August 28, 2010

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Notice requesting submissions from candidates interested in becoming the regulator of immigration consultants

Further to the Notice of Intent published in the Canada Gazette on June 12, 2010, the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism is inviting submissions from candidate entities interested in performing the responsibilities of a governing body for the regulation of immigration consultants. The candidate entities must demonstrate that their organization has or will have the capacity to effectively regulate immigration consulting activities in the public interest, thereby enhancing public confidence in the immigration process and preserving the integrity of the immigration system.

Focusing on membership, competence and compliance, complaints and investigations, and discipline, the body identified for recognition must demonstrate that it has or will have the capacity to meet established organizational competencies that serve as selection factors for this process. The regulator must also demonstrate an understanding of its public protection role and of the vulnerability of its primary constituency: would-be users of Canada’s immigration programs. As regulator of a self-governing profession, the body is expected to provide a procedurally fair and accessible complaint and discipline mechanism, a code of conduct, errors and omission insurance for members, liability insurance for the body itself, a compensation fund, and the commitment to provide full services in both official languages to both members and clients.

The regulator must be accountable, transparent and democratic. As regulator of immigration consultants, the organization’s primary objective must be to ensure that the public is well served by an honourable and competent body of consultants.

Background

On June 8, 2010, the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism introduced the Cracking Down on Crooked Consultants Act in the House of Commons in order to strengthen the rules governing those who charge a fee for immigration advice, close immigration system loopholes currently exploited by crooked consultants, and improve the way in which immigration consultants are regulated. In addition to tabling this Bill, a Notice of Intent was published on June 12, 2010, in the Canada Gazette, announcing Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s (CIC) intention to launch a transparent public selection process to identify a governing body for recognition as the regulator of immigration consultants, under current authority. The Notice of Intent solicited comments from the public on the proposed selection process for the period ending July 2, 2010. A large number of comments were received suggesting measures to strengthen the transparency, accountability and effectiveness of the regulation of third party representatives.

Following this solicitation period and after considering comments received by the public, selection factors were developed to ensure that any entity serving as the regulator of immigration consultants has or will have the capacity to support Canada’s immediate and long-term immigration objectives as well as maintain public confidence in the immigration system.

While this process is proceeding under existing authorities under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, candidate entities should contemplate the potential of future regulation of consultants for purposes of the Citizenship Act as proposed in Bill C-37.

Selection process

A Selection Committee, comprised of officials from CIC, one or several federal government organization(s) as well as one or several external expert(s), will examine all submissions in relation to the competencies listed below, which serve as selection factors. Established candidate organizations may provide evidence of their direct experience to support their candidacy. Where a candidate entity does not yet have direct operational experience, the experience of the individuals making the submission, or of the proposed key employees or officers, in the context of the submission, will be assessed. If a selection factor is lacking in the candidate entity, the candidate must demonstrate how it will fulfil the particular selection factor, including the provision of supporting documents.

After considering the submissions and other relevant factors and assuming that at least one organization is identified by the Selection Committee as meeting the selection factors, the Committee will provide the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism with a recommendation as to which organization(s), if any, has or have demonstrated the necessary competence, integrity, accountability, good governance and viability to effectively regulate the profession so as to preserve the integrity of the immigration system. If the Committee is of the view that no organization meets the selection factors, this will be indicated.

Selection factors

1. Competence

Candidate entities must demonstrate competence as a regulator, as follows. Candidates must employ individuals with demonstrated knowledge of Canada’s immigration regime and issues pertaining to the regulation of immigration consultants.

Candidate entities must demonstrate that they have acquired or have developed a plan to acquire the expertise to set adequate standards of competence, practice and ethical conduct, and official language standards. They must describe proposed mechanisms for the rigorous assessment of competence of prospective members, procedurally fair and effective complaint and discipline mechanisms, as well as certification procedures and procedures to accredit consultant training and continuing education programs with high standards. The candidate entity must also be able to demonstrate that it will be able to obtain liability insurance and be able to establish a compensation fund to compensate the public in cases of member malpractice.

Candidate entities must demonstrate how they have, or will acquire, the experience necessary to adjudicate on disciplinary matters with procedurally fair policies and procedures.

The candidate entities must demonstrate their commitment to provide full services in both official languages to both members and clients. Complaint mechanisms, in particular, must be accessible to clients and members of the public, including consideration of various language profiles. Furthermore, candidate entities must ensure that their members are able to offer services in one of Canada’s official languages.

2. Integrity

Candidate entities must specifically demonstrate how they will protect the Canadian public and those who use the services of immigration consultants, enhance public confidence in the immigration process, and preserve the integrity of the immigration system. Candidate entities must describe the tools or measures they will use, including the development of awareness campaigns on issues of fraud and available recourses among immigrant communities, immigrant service providers, as well as the general public.

Candidate entities must be able to establish a conflict of interest code for members of the Board of Directors, a written code of ethics for directors, staff and volunteers, as well as a code of conduct with a description of effective disciplinary mechanisms for immigration consultants.

3. Accountability

Submissions must demonstrate how candidate entities intend to foster a culture of transparency and openness so that they can be properly accountable to their membership and to the Canadian public. Candidate entities must describe the tools they will use, including the provision of draft by-laws. Each candidate entity must also demonstrate a commitment to annual public meetings with full and transparent participation, in order to maintain an open dialogue with members, communicate with its principal constituencies, and report on its activities and finances to members, the public and the Government of Canada. To help ensure accountability to the public, candidate entities must also attempt to ensure that public interest directors are on the Board.

Candidate entities will need to demonstrate that they have developed or will develop a process which will enable them to be accountable and transparent to their members and the public through external audits and regular reporting, including the publication of an annual report and audited financial statements. Provisions must also be made for members’ access to corporate records and audited financial statements. Reports to members and the public must include information on disciplinary proceedings, with information identifying the member at issue, the nature of the alleged misconduct, the process for reviewing the case, and the conclusions arrived at pursuant to the proceedings.

The democratic election of directors and the establishment of procedures to provide members with effective means to hold directors accountable and, where appropriate, to democratically change the by-laws of the organization will ensure accountability.

4. Viability

Candidate entities must be able to demonstrate that they have acquired or have developed a plan to acquire expertise in financial management and reporting, and the ability to ensure the same on an ongoing basis. This will ensure the support of member consultants, increase public faith in the profession, and ensure that the candidate entity plays its full role in maintaining the integrity of Canada’s immigration system.

Submissions must demonstrate how the candidate entity will establish a plan, including the parameters of such a plan, to ensure a membership base which would provide for the sustainability of the body, promote membership to qualified practitioners, and demonstrate the ability to implement transitional measures, with respect to the membership, if necessary.

Candidate entities must be incorporated or capable of being incorporated as a non-profit corporation under federal law. Candidate entities that are not currently incorporated by federal law must provide an undertaking to do so as soon as is reasonably practicable. As it is expected that the regulator would be funded by its members on an on-going basis, candidate entities must demonstrate the ability to be financially stable by the development of a sustainable financial plan. Financial assistance may be available to assist the successful candidate during an interim period for the purpose of establishing the governing body. Candidates should provide details on the amount and type of expenses, along with the time period for which such financial support would be of assistance.

5. Good governance

Submissions must demonstrate how the Board of Directors will contribute to the positive reputation of the regulator and the profession, and how governance expertise will be developed and reflected in the composition and training of directors.

A candidate entity must demonstrate that it has taken steps to hire — or will hire — staff according to merit.

Candidate entities must also ensure that their directors are paid honoraria comparable to similar self-regulating bodies.

In addition to demonstrating sound corporate governance and financial expertise, candidate entities must demonstrate an ability to engage in strategic planning and organizational performance management and evaluation. The regulator must be able to demonstrate sound financial management and stewardship, monitor its progress in meeting objectives, and carry out its activities in a transparent manner.

Candidate entities must demonstrate how they will inform members and consumers of the services of immigration consultants so that members and consumers have a clear understanding of the activities, finances, purposes of the regulator as well as of their rights and obligations.

Evaluative process

Candidates will need to demonstrate that they have or will have the capacity to meet the established organizational competencies that serve as selection factors for this process. Candidates will be evaluated on their vision, their understanding of the scope and depth of the task at hand, and the experience and expertise they can bring toward establishing and running a regulatory body. It is up to the candidate entity to demonstrate that it has or can acquire sufficient understanding, skills, experience and member support to build and run a competent regulator for the immigration consultant profession.

Candidates must set out, in detail, how they respond to the selection factors, and must provide supporting documentation to demonstrate how the selection factors are met, such as a financial plan, a human resources plan, codes of conduct or other appropriate documents. Supportive documentation on resource requirements and potential sources of funding must be provided.

If candidates have prepared draft or existing material for similar organizations, such as by-laws or codes, they may wish to include them and explain the individual or group’s role in their creation and implementation, and how that experience would be applicable to the process of creating a regulator of immigration consultants.

Publicly available information will also be used by the Selection Committee to evaluate applicants.

Only those submissions which clearly indicate how the candidates satisfy the selection factors will be chosen for further consideration.

This Call for Submissions does not obligate the Minister, the Department of Citizenship and Immigration or the Government of Canada in any way, or to take any action.

An agreement or arrangement may be entered into between the successful entity and the Government of Canada.

Deadline

The deadline for submissions is 4:00 p.m. (EST) on December 29, 2010.

Submissions

CIC is not liable under any circumstances for any costs associated with the preparation of submissions.

Submissions should bear the following title: “Immigration Consultants Regulatory Body: Submission for Consideration.”

Submission should clearly indicate the contact details including: name, address, phone number, email.

Submissions may either be delivered via email or regular post:

Email: Consultants@cic.gc.ca

Regular mail:

Attention: Fraud Deterrence and Verifications Division, B1435
Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC)
14th Floor, Jean Edmonds Tower South (JETS)
365 Laurier Avenue W
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 1L1

Correspondence

All correspondence pertaining to the submission should be directed to the following email address: Consultants@cic.gc.ca, and as per the following format:

Title: Immigration Consultants Regulatory Body: Submissions for Consideration

Issue/Question:

Name/Company:

Email address:

Telephone number:

Should there be a need, CIC will provide further information on www.cic.gc.ca.

SANDRA HARDER
Acting Director General
Immigration Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2010-87-09-03 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), hereby makes the annexed Order 2010-87-09-03 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Ottawa, August 12, 2010

JIM PRENTICE
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2010-87-09-03 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENTS

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by deleting the following:

68309-62-6
68526-18-1
68698-87-3
457900-07-1

2. Part II of the List is amended by deleting the following:

18078-6

COMING INTO FORCE

3. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2010-87-09-02 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Cyclododecane, 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromo- (hexabromocyclododecane), CAS No. 3194-55-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Cyclododecane, 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromo- (hexabromocyclododecane) is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment Report conducted on hexabromocyclododecane pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that hexabromocyclododecane meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act; and

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are satisfied that the criteria set out under subsection 77(4) of the Act are met,

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health intend to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that hexabromocyclododecane be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is hereby also given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose the implementation of virtual elimination of hexabromocyclododecane under subsection 65(3) of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have released a risk management scope document for hexabromocyclododecane to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), Existing.Substances.Existantes@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

GEORGE ENEI
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

MARGARET KENNY
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment Report on Hexabromocyclododecane

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Cyclododecane, 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromo-, more commonly referred to as hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 3194-55-6. HBCD was one of 123 substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL) selected for a pilot project for screening assessments. During the categorization of the DSL, the substance was identified as a high priority for screening assessment as it met the criteria for persistence, bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to aquatic life. Therefore, the focus of the assessment relates principally to ecological risk.

The primary application of HBCD is as a flame retardant in polystyrene foams that are used as thermal insulation materials in the construction industry. A second application is the flame retarding of textiles for usage in residential and commercial upholstered furniture, transportation seating, wall coverings and draperies. Minor uses include addition to latex binders, adhesives and paints, and to high-impact polystyrene and styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) resins for electrical and electronic equipment.

Global demand for HBCD was estimated at 16 700 tonnes in 2001, representing 8.2% of total demand for brominated flame retardants that year. Results from a section 71 Notice with Respect to Certain Substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL) conducted for the year 2000 indicated that HBCD was not manufactured in Canada in 2000. Amounts imported into the country in that year were in the range of 100 000 to 1 000 000 kg.

Environment

Monitoring studies document the presence of HBCD in many environmental media, sometimes at high concentrations. Analyses of sediment core samples show a clear trend of increasing concentrations of HBCD since the 1970s, confirming stability in deep sediments for periods of more than 25 to 30 years. As well, there is evidence of increasing HBCD levels in North American and European biota, both within species and along food chains.

Measured and modelled data indicate that HBCD will undergo primary degradation; however, ultimate degradation in the environment has not been definitively established. Laboratory studies conducted using water, sediment, soil and sludge confirm the presence of primary degradation products, including 1,5,9-cyclododecatriene, a substance that is not readily biodegradable and may be stable in the environment. Available evidence indicates that 1,5,9-cyclododecatriene is potentially very toxic to aquatic life (with measured and predicted median lethal concentrations (LC50s) < 1 mg/L) and is potentially highly bioaccumulative in aquatic organisms.

Considered together, the lines of evidence from degradation studies and monitoring data establish that HBCD can remain stable in the environment for a period exceeding one year. The substance therefore meets the criteria for persistence as outlined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations under CEPA 1999 (i.e. half-life in water and soil of 182 days or more and half-life in sediment of 365 days or more). Additionally, HBCD meets the criteria for persistence in air set out in the same regulations (i.e. half-life of two days or more, or being subject to atmospheric transport from the source to a remote area), based on a predicted atmospheric half-life of 2.13 days and evidence of occurrence in regions considered remote from potential sources, including the Arctic.

The weight of experimental and predicted data indicates that HBCD meets the criteria for bioaccumulation as specified in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations under CEPA 1999 — bioaccumulation (BAF) or bioconcentration factors (BCF) of 5000 or more — and is likely to have significant bioaccumulation potential in the environment. Bioconcentration factors of 18 100 (rainbow trout) and 12 866 (steady state, fathead minnow) were obtained in laboratory studies. Field studies show evidence that bioaccumulation and biomagnification are occurring within the food webs.

HBCD has demonstrated toxicity in both aquatic and terrestrial species, with significant adverse effects on survival, reproduction and development reported in algae, daphnids and annelid worms. Recent studies indicate potential impacts on the normal functioning of liver enzymes and thyroid hormones in fish. In mammals, sublethal exposures have been associated with potential toxicological effects on the liver and thyroid system, including cellular damage, significantly increased hepatic enzyme activity, significant reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels and increases in thyroid weight.

Combustion of HBCD under certain conditions may lead to production of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) and dibenzofurans (PBDFs). Trace levels of these compounds and their precursors have been measured during combustion of flame-retarded polystyrene materials containing HBCD. These transformation products are brominated analogues of the Toxic Substances Management Policy Track 1 polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzo-p-dioxins.

The analysis of risk quotients determined that HBCD concentrations in the Canadian environment have the potential to cause adverse effects in populations of pelagic and benthic organisms but are unlikely to result in direct adverse effects to soil organisms and wildlife. However, it must be considered that the presence of HBCD in the environment warrants concern in light of strong evidence that the substance is environmentally persistent and bioaccumulative.

While recent detailed production and use information are not available for HBCD, monitoring studies suggest that North American and global use of the substance may be on the rise. As well, there is evidence that HBCD may be replacing some polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants (notably the commercial Decabromodiphenyl Ether formulation).

Based on the information in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed that HBCD is entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity.

Human health

Exposures of the general population of Canada to HBCD may occur through oral and inhalation routes. Known sources of human exposure to HBCD include environmental media (ambient air, water, soil, sediment), household dust, indoor air, human breast milk, and HBCD-treated consumer products. HBCD may be released from the matrix of a product over time through abrasion and usage, as it is not covalently bound. As HBCD has a low vapour pressure, it will not volatilize or off-gas from a product.

The human health hazard risk characterization for HBCD was based primarily upon the assessment of the European Union, with more recent data taken into consideration. The critical effect for the characterization of risk to human health is reproductive toxicity, with reported effects including decreased fertility and effects upon the thyroid. The highest upper-bounding estimated intake of HBCD is expected to be in infants from ingestion of human breast milk and the mouthing of consumer products. A comparison of these exposure estimates with the critical effect levels identified in the two-generation reproductive toxicity assay results in margins of exposure that are considered adequately protective of human health. Based on the available information it is proposed that HBCD is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Where relevant, research and monitoring will support verification of assumptions used during the screening assessment and, where appropriate, the performance of potential control measures identified during the risk management phase.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available for environment and human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that HBCD meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

In addition, it is proposed that HBCD meets the criteria for persistence and bioaccumulation potential as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations, and its presence in the environment results primarily from human activity.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the proposed risk management scope document for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for the substance — Decabromodiphenyl Ether — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Decabromodiphenyl Ether is a substance already on Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas significant new information on Decabromodiphenyl Ether has become available and has been analyzed in a report on the state of the science; and

Whereas a summary of the final Ecological State of the Science report on Decabromodiphenyl Ether conducted pursuant to paragraph 68(b) of the Act is annexed hereby,

Notice is hereby given that this new information was considered in the final Revised Risk Management Strategy for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

JIM PRENTICE
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Summary of the Ecological State of the Science Report on Decabromodiphenyl Ether

In July 2006, the final decision on the screening assessment of substances — polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) — was published by the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health in the Canada Gazette, Part I. It was concluded that PBDEs — i.e. Tetrabromodiphenyl Ether (tetraBDE), Pentabromodiphenyl Ether (pentaBDE), Hexabromodiphenyl Ether (hexaBDE), Heptabromodiphenyl Ether (heptaBDE), Octabromodiphenyl Ether (octaBDE), Nonabromodiphenyl Ether (nonaBDE) and Decabromodiphenyl Ether (decaBDE) — which are found in commercial PentaBDE, OctaBDE and DecaBDE technical formulations, are entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, and thus meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(a) of Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999). In addition, it was concluded that all seven PBDEs homologues met the criteria for persistence, but only tetra- to hexaBDE met the criteria for bioaccumulation as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. The analysis also noted that the higher brominated diphenyl ethers, and decaBDE in particular, could accumulate to some degree in biota and debrominate to bioaccumulative and persistent transformation products.

Since the completion of the Ecological Screening Assessment, a large amount of new information has been published regarding the accumulation of decaBDE in biota and the potential transformation of decaBDE to persistent and bioaccumulative products. The purpose of the present report is to provide an updated analysis of bioaccumulation and transformation of decaBDE, by summarizing evidence considered in the original Screening Assessment, and then examining the related new science published up to August 25, 2009.

Overall, available data do not show that the decaBDE itself meets the numeric criteria for bioaccumulation as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. With regard to bioaccumulation, potential factors such as low assimilation efficiency and/or metabolic transformation appear to be important determinants of accumulation in organisms. Nevertheless, some recent studies have shown concentrations of decaBDE to be increasing steadily in some wildlife species and there are a few equivocal reports of biomagnification factors (BMFs) exceeding 1. In some cases, such as in the tissues of kestrel, sparrowhawk, peregrine falcon, glaucous gull, red fox, shark, harbour porpoise and whitebeaked dolphin, measured concentrations of decaBDE in tissues are interpreted as high. While trophic magnification or bioaccumulation is a potential explanation for these high concentrations, it is also very possible that some biota are exposed to very high exposure concentrations of decaBDE by consuming contaminated refuse and/or inhabiting decaBDE hotspots close to industrialized areas.

This report also considers it reasonable to conclude that decaBDE may contribute to the formation of lesser-brominated PBDEs and other metabolic products in organisms — potentially those that are bioaccumulative. Although there is some uncertainty, the evaluation found evidence that fish and mammals appear to have some capacity to metabolically break down decaBDE. In fish, decaBDE appears to form hepta- to nonaBDEs, and potentially penta- and hexaBDEs. In mammals, debromination of decaBDE down to heptaBDEs has been observed. In both fish and mammals, formation of lower brominated PBDEs appears to be very low and only a fraction (typically on the order of a few percent) of the total amount of decaBDE administered to the organism. However, some rodent studies have made inferences, based on mass balance evaluations, that rates of transformation may be higher, with one study suggesting that approximately 45% of the total dose of decaBDE was unaccounted for and may have been metabolized to other compounds (such as hydroxylated and hydroxymethoxylated PBDEs) and/or bound as inextricable residues.

The evaluation of transformation in the environment identified numerous laboratory studies that provide evidence that decaBDE may break down in the environment, particularly as a result of photodegradation and biodegradation. Studies of photodegradation of decaBDE sorbed to solids in aqueous and dry systems have demonstrated transformation of decaBDE into tri- to nonaBDEs, tri- to octabrominated dibenzofurans (octaBDFs) and unidentified products. While relevant to the environment, the actual fraction of decaBDE exposed to sunlight adsorbed to atmospheric and aquatic particulates, or solids (anthropogenic or natural), would be a small fraction of the total amount of decaBDE in the environment. Biodegradation studies have also shown potential breakdown of decaBDE mainly to nona-, octa- and heptaBDEs, while transformation to triBDEs has also been shown under enhanced laboratory conditions. Overall, biodegradation appears to occur at a much slower rate than that of phototransformation, with half-lives in the range of several years to several decades. The photolytic half-life of decaBDE adsorbed to house dust and exposed to sunlight has been reported to range from approximately one to two months (assuming eight hours of sunlight per day).

Modelling of bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and BMFs was conducted to estimate whether transformation products of decaBDE resulting from processes in organisms and in the general environment could be bioaccumulative. The evaluation found that many of the identified transformation products could be bioaccumulative (i.e. have BAFs in excess of 5 000) and some could biomagnify in food chains. The analysis also indicated potential transformation of decaBDE to products (i.e. tetra- to hexaBDEs) that have been established as bioaccumulative based on empirical evidence.

While laboratory studies on the transformation of decaBDE support a conclusion that transformation to lower BDEs and BDFs should be occurring in the environment, the phenomenon has not been conclusively shown through monitoring studies to occur in the environment. This suggests that the process of environmental transformation may be very slow and subtle, and possibly may have relevance to a small fraction of the total decaBDE reservoir in the environment. Evidence of transformation may be shielded by existing patterns of PBDEs in the environment which are dominated by congeners found in the commercial products. The fact that fewer studies have historically measured octa- and nonaBDE congeners in environmental samples makes the elucidation of debromination patterns of decaBDE in the environment challenging.

While this report has focused on decaBDE, its analyses and conclusions provide useful inferences on alternative flame retardants with similar chemical structures and use patterns, such as Decabromodiphenyl Ethane (decaBD ethane). DecaBDE and decaBD ethane have only minor structural differences relating to the bond between their aromatic rings and, thus, these substances may have similarities in physical and chemical properties, persistence, transformation patterns, and accumulation in organisms. Based on the similarity in properties between decaBDE and decaBD ethane, the presence of decaBD ethane in Canadian wildlife, and the potential for decaBD ethane to be used as a large-scale replacement for decaBDE, there is also a need to further understand the potential risks from decaBD ethane in the environment and its capacity to accumulate in wildlife and transform to potentially bioaccumulative products. Understanding the risk from alternatives generally will help to ensure that substitutions of flame retardants are made on an informed basis.

The final Ecological State of the Science Report on Decabromodiphenyl Ether is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

Food and Drug Regulations — Amendments

Interim Marketing Authorization

Provisions currently exist in the Food and Drug Regulations (the Regulations) for the use of the enzyme cellulase derived from Trichoderma reesei QM 9414 in the production of single-strength fruit juices and tea leaves for the production of tea solids at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice. Provisions also exists in the Regulations for the use of the enzyme xylanase derived from Aspergillus oryzae Fa 1-1 (pA2C1TI) in the production of bread, flour and whole wheat flour at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice.

Health Canada has received a submission to permit the use of the enzymes cellulase and xylanase derived from a genetically modified Trichoderma reesei RI-P37, Trichoderma reesei A83, in the production of bread, flour, whole wheat flour and unstandardized bakery products at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice. Evaluation of available data supports the safety and effectiveness of cellulase and xylanase derived from Trichoderma reesei A83 in the production of bread, flour, whole wheat flour and unstandardized bakery products at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice.

The use of the cellulase and xylanase derived from this genetically modified micro-organism will benefit the consumer by increasing the availability of quality food products. It will also benefit industry through more efficient and improved manufacturing conditions.

Therefore, it is the intention of Health Canada to recommend that the Regulations be amended to permit the use of cellulase and xylanase derived from Trichoderma reesei A83 in the production of bread, flour, whole wheat flour and unstandardized bakery products at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice.

As a means to improve the responsiveness of the regulatory system, an Interim Marketing Authorization is being issued to permit the immediate use of cellulase and xylanase derived from Trichoderma reesei A83 in the production of bread, flour, whole wheat flour and unstandardized bakery products at maximum levels of use consistent with good manufacturing practice while the regulatory process is undertaken to amend the Regulations. The standardized foods described above are exempted from the application of sections 6 and 6.1 of the Food and Drugs Act, paragraphs B.01.042(a) and (c), section B.16.007 and, as appropriate, sections B.13.001, B.13.005 and B.13.021 of the Regulations. The unstandardized foods listed above are exempted from paragraph B.01.043(a) and section B.16.007 of the Regulations.

The proposed regulatory amendments would be enabling measures to allow the sale of the foods mentioned above that have been manufactured through the use of the cellulase and xylanase derived from Trichoderma reesei A83. The amendments are supported by the safety assessment and would have low impact on the economy and on the environment. Consequently, the regulatory amendments may proceed directly to final approval and publication in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Interested persons may make representations, with respect to Health Canada’s intention to amend the Regulations, within 75 days after the date of publication of this notice. All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be addressed to the contact person identified below.

Contact

Rick O’Leary, Acting Associate Director, Bureau of Food Regulatory, International and Interagency Affairs, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Address Locator 2203B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-946-6752 (telephone), 613-941-6625 (fax), sche-ann@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

August 19, 2010

MEENA BALLANTYNE
Assistant Deputy Minister
Health Products and Food Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

Food and Drug Regulations — Amendments

Interim Marketing Authorization

Provisions currently exist in the Food and Drug Regulations (the Regulations) for the use of the enzyme chymosin A derived from Escherichia coli K-12, GE81 (pPFZ87A) and chymosin B derived from Aspergillus niger var. awamori, GCC0349 (pGAMpR) and Kluyveromyces marxianus var. lactis, DS 1182 (pKS105) in the production of cheddar cheese, (naming the variety) cheese, cottage cheese, cream cheese, cream cheese with (naming the added ingredients), cream cheese spread, cream cheese spread with (naming the added ingredients), sour cream and unstandardized milk-based dessert preparations at a maximum level of use consistent with good manufacturing practice.

Health Canada has received a submission to permit the use of the chymosin enzyme derived from a genetically modified Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus niger var. awamori (pCCEx3), that carries the chymosin gene from Camelus dromedarius. This chymosin enzyme will be used in the production of cheddar cheese, (naming the variety) cheese, cottage cheese, cream cheese, cream cheese with (naming the added ingredients), cream cheese spread, cream cheese spread with (naming the added ingredients), sour cream and unstandardized milk-based dessert preparations at a maximum level of use consistent with good manufacturing practice. Evaluation of available data supports the safety and effectiveness of chymosin derived from Aspergillus niger var. awamori (pCCEx3) in these food products.

The use of the chymosin derived from this genetically modified micro-organism will benefit consumers by increasing the availability of quality food products. It will also benefit industry through the availability of a more efficient coagulant that is more tolerant to high pH and temperature variations.

Therefore, it is the intention of Health Canada to recommend that the Regulations be amended to permit the use of chymosin derived from Aspergillus niger var. awamori (pCCEx3) in the production of cheddar cheese, (naming the variety) cheese, cottage cheese, cream cheese, cream cheese with (naming the added ingredients), cream cheese spread, cream cheese spread with (naming the added ingredients), sour cream and unstandardized milk-based dessert preparations at a maximum level of use consistent with good manufacturing practice.

As a means to improve the responsiveness of the regulatory system, an Interim Marketing Authorization is being issued to permit the immediate use of chymosin derived from Aspergillus niger var. awamori (pCCEx3) in the production of cheddar cheese, (naming the variety) cheese, cottage cheese, cream cheese, cream cheese with (naming the added ingredients), cream cheese spread, cream cheese spread with (naming the added ingredients), sour cream and unstandardized milk-based dessert preparations at a maximum level of use consistent with good manufacturing practice while the regulatory process is undertaken to amend the Regulations. The standardized foods described above are exempted from the application of sections 6 and 6.1 of the Food and Drugs Act, paragraphs B.01.042(a) and (c), section B.16.007 and, as appropriate, subsections B.08.033(3), B.08.034(2), B.08.035(2), B.08.037(2), B.08.038(2), B.08.039(2) and paragraph B.08.077(b) of the Regulations. The unstandardized foods listed above are exempted from paragraph B.01.043(a) and section B.16.007 of the Regulations.

The proposed regulatory amendments would be enabling measures to allow the sale of the foods mentioned above that have been manufactured through the use of the chymosin from Aspergillus niger var. awamori (pCCEx3). The amendments are supported by the safety assessment and would have low impact on the economy and on the environment. Consequently, the regulatory amendments may proceed directly to final approval and publication in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Interested persons may make representations, with respect to Health Canada’s intention to amend the Regulations, within 75 days after the date of publication of this notice. All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be addressed to the contact person identified below.

Contact

Rick O’Leary, Acting Associate Director, Bureau of Food Regulatory, International and Interagency Affairs, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Address Locator 2203B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-946-6752 (telephone), 613-941-6625 (fax), sche-ann@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

August 19, 2010

MEENA BALLANTYNE
Assistant Deputy Minister
Health Products and Food Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

CANADA STUDENT LOANS REGULATIONS

Interest rates

In accordance with subsection 13(3) of the Canada Student Loans Regulations, notice is hereby given that, pursuant to subsections 13(1) and 13(2) respectively, the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development has fixed the Class “A” rate of interest at 3.0% and the Class “B” rate of interest at 4.125% for the loan year ending on July 31, 2011.

August 1, 2010

DIANE FINLEY
Minister of Human Resources and
Skills Development

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-014-10 — Release of SRSP-310.5, Issue 2: Technical Requirements for Fixed Line-of-sight Radio Systems Operating in the Band 10.55-10.68 GHz

Notice is hereby given that Industry Canada is releasing Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-310.5, Issue 2: Technical Requirements for Fixed Line-of-sight Radio Systems Operating in the Band 10.55-10.68 GHz, which sets out the minimum technical requirements for the efficient utilization of this band.

General information

The document SRSP-310.5, Issue 2, will come into force as of the date of publication of this notice.

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC).

Any inquiries regarding SRSP-310.5 should be directed to the Manager, Fixed Wireless Planning, 613-990-4792 (telephone), 613-952-5108 (fax), srsp.pnrh@ic.gc.ca (email).

Interested parties should submit their comments within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Submitting comments

Respondents are requested to provide their comments in electronic format (WordPerfect, Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Fixed Wireless Planning, along with a note specifying the software, version number and operating system used.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Director General, Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch, Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SMSE-014-10).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Canadian Government Publishing at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

August 19, 2010

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Regina Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Christine Stadel
Melissa Boxall

Ottawa, July 22, 2010

RICHARD WEX
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

AERONAUTICS ACTS

Interim Order Respecting Identity Screening

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 6.41(1.2) (see footnote d) of the Aeronautics Act (see footnote e), the Minister of Transport has consulted with the persons and organizations that the Minister considers appropriate in the circumstances concerning the annexed Interim Order Respecting Identity Screening;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 6.41(1) (see footnote f) of the Aeronautics Act (see footnote g), hereby makes the annexed Interim Order Respecting Identity Screening.

Ottawa, August 20, 2010

CHUCK STRAHL
Minister of Transport

INTERIM ORDER RESPECTING IDENTITY SCREENING

INTERPRETATION

Definition

1. In this Interim Order, “Act” means the Aeronautics Act.

Conflict

2. If there is a conflict between this Interim Order and the Identity Screening Regulations, this Interim Order prevails to the extent of the conflict.

APPLICATION

Application

3. This Interim Order applies in respect of the following passenger-carrying flights if the passengers are screened before boarding for weapons, explosive substances, incendiary devices or their components or other dangerous items that could be used to jeopardize the security of an aerodrome or an aircraft:

(a) domestic flights that depart from aerodromes listed in the schedule to the CATSA Aerodrome Designation Regulations and are conducted by air carriers under Subpart 5 of Part VII of the Canadian Aviation Regulations; and

(b) international flights that depart from or will arrive at aerodromes listed in the schedule to the CATSA Aerodrome Designation Regulations and are conducted by air carriers

(i) under Subpart 1 of Part VII of the Canadian Aviation Regulations using aircraft that have a maximum certificated take-off weight (MCTOW) of more than 8 618 kg (19,000 pounds) or have a seating configuration, excluding crew seats, of 20 or more, or

(ii) under Subpart 5 of Part VII of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

BOARDING GATE SCREENINGS

Domestic flights

4. (1) An air carrier must, at a boarding gate for a domestic flight, screen each passenger for the flight by looking at the passenger, and in particular his or her entire face, to determine if he or she appears to be 18 years of age or older.

Required identification

(2) The air carrier must also screen each passenger who appears to be 18 years of age or older by comparing the passenger, and in particular his or her entire face, against

(a) a restricted area identity card;

(b) one piece of government-issued photo identification that shows the passenger’s name, date of birth and gender; or

(c) two pieces of government-issued identification at least one of which shows the passenger’s name, date of birth and gender.

International flights

5. (1) An air carrier must, at a boarding gate for an international flight, screen each passenger for the flight by looking at the passenger, and in particular his or her entire face, to determine if he or she appears to be 18 years of age or older.

Required identification

(2) The air carrier must also screen each passenger who appears to be 18 years of age or older by comparing the passenger, and in particular his or her entire face, against

(a) a restricted area identity card; or

(b) one piece of government-issued photo identification that shows the passenger’s name, date of birth and gender.

Lost or stolen identification

6. (1) An air carrier may screen a passenger who appears to be 18 years of age or older by comparing the passenger, and in particular his or her entire face, against an alternative form of identification if the passenger presents documentation from a government or police service attesting to the loss or theft of the identification required under subsection 4(2) or 5(2).

Examples

(2) Alternative forms of identification include but are not limited to employee identity cards, public transit passes and baptismal certificates.

Prohibition

7. An air carrier must not transport a passenger if

(a) the passenger presents a piece of photo identification and does not resemble the photograph;

(b) the passenger does not appear to be the age indicated by the date of birth on the identification he or she presents;

(c) the passenger does not appear to be the gender indicated on the identification he or she presents; or

(d) the passenger presents more than one form of identification and there is a major discrepancy between those forms of identification.

Medical exception

8. An air carrier may transport a passenger who presents a piece of photo identification and does not resemble the photograph if

(a) the passenger was disfigured after the photograph was taken and he or she presents the air carrier with a document signed by a health care professional that attests to this fact; or

(b) the passenger’s face is bandaged for medical reasons and he or she presents the air carrier with a document signed by a health care professional that attests to this fact.

DESIGNATED PROVISIONS

Designation

9. (1) The following provisions of this Interim Order are designated as provisions the contravention of which may be dealt with in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 7.7 to 8.2 of the Act:

(a) subsection 4(1);

(b) subsection 4(2);

(c) subsection 5(1);

(d) subsection 5(2); and

(e) section 7.

Maximum amounts

(2) The maximum amount payable in respect of a contravention of a designated provision referred to in subsection (1) is

(a) $5,000, in the case of an individual; and

(b) $25,000, in the case of a corporation.

Notice of contraventions

10. A notice referred to in subsection 7.7(1) of the Act must specify

(a) the particulars of the alleged contravention;

(b) that the person on whom the notice is served or to whom it is sent has the option of paying the amount specified in the notice or filing with the Tribunal a request for a review of the alleged contravention or the amount of the penalty;

(c) that payment of the amount specified in the notice will be accepted by the Minister in satisfaction of the amount of the penalty for the alleged contravention and that no further proceedings under Part I of the Act will be taken against the person on whom the notice in respect of that contravention is served or to whom it is sent;

(d) that the person on whom the notice is served or to whom it is sent will be provided with an opportunity consistent with procedural fairness and natural justice to present evidence before the Tribunal and make representations in relation to the alleged contravention if the person files a request for a review with the Tribunal; and

(e) that the person on whom the notice is served or to whom it is sent will be deemed to have committed the contravention set out in the notice if the person fails to pay the amount specified in the notice and fails to file a request for a review with the Tribunal within the prescribed period.

[35-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN MUSEUM OF NATURE

Director (full-time position)

Salary range: $169,900–$199,900
Location: National Capital Region

The origins of the Canadian Museum of Nature date back to 1856 when its predecessor, the Geological Survey of Canada, was given the mandate to exhibit its native collections of plants, animals, minerals and fossils. Home to one of the world’s largest natural history collections, including 24 major science collections of more than 10 million specimens, the Museum covers four billion years of Earth history. Its current status as a federal Crown corporation dates back to 1990, when the Museums Act was proclaimed. As a national institution and member of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, the Museum’s mandate is to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of, and appreciation and respect for the natural world.

The Director is the Chief Executive Officer and, under the direction of the Board, is responsible for providing corporate leadership for the management of the Canadian Museum of Nature’s resources and assets and for the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations in meeting its mandated objectives.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. Corporate leadership experience at the Chief Executive Officer or senior executive level in an organization of a similar size and complexity is required. The selected candidate should possess experience in financial management and revenue generation through fundraising and establishing collaborative relationships. The qualified candidate will also have experience in strategic management and in substantial organizational change initiatives. Experience in national outreach initiatives and in dealing with government, preferably with senior government officials, are necessary. Experience in reporting to or serving a board would be considered an asset.

The suitable candidate should possess general knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate and activities of the Museum. Knowledge of the current challenges and opportunities for Canadian cultural institutions, and of the federal government’s policy agenda and how it relates to the Museum is required. Possessing financial literacy, the qualified candidate should also be knowledgeable of sound governance and management principles and practices. Knowledge of the cultural, patrimonial and/or recreational tourism sectors would be considered an asset.

The successful candidate is a strategic and innovative leader who will be able to provide corporate leadership and vision needed to ensure that the Museum is able to carry out its mandate and achieve its objectives. In addition to the ability to identify, analyze and define priorities and strategies, the ideal candidate should also possess the ability to focus the energies and talents of the Museum’s employees and motivate them to achieve corporate objectives. Possessing superior interpersonal skills, sound judgment and integrity, the selected candidate will demonstrate the ability to develop effective working relationships with the Board, management, the Minister and the Minister’s Office, the Deputy Minister and the Museum’s partners and stakeholders. Superior communications skills, both written and oral, are required, as is the ability to act as a spokesperson in representing the Museum with stakeholders, media, public institutions, governments and other organizations. The suitable candidate should have a strong interest in the natural history and environment of Canada and should be motivated by challenge and change. He/she should also possess superior analytical skills and adhere to high ethical standards.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must be prepared to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance, and be prepared to travel as required across Canada and abroad.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical Guidelines for Public Office Holders and the Guidelines for the Political Activities of Public Office Holders. The guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a Confidential Report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.nature.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae to Spencer Stuart at CMNpresident@spencerstuart.com.

Bilingual notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Canadian Government Publishing, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[35-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Balance sheet as at July 31, 2010

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

2.8

Loans and receivables

   

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

6.3

 

Advances to Governments

   

Securities purchased under resale agreements

2,942.0

 

Other loans and receivables

2.3

 
   

2,950.6

Investments

   

Treasury bills of Canada

23,175.2

 

Other securities issued or guaranteed by Canada:

   

maturing within three years

14,759.5

 

maturing in over three years but not over five years

5,222.3

 

maturing in over five years but not over ten years

5,500.9

 

maturing in over ten years

7,351.8

 

Other investments

38.0

 
   

56,047.7

Property and equipment

 

148.0

Other assets

 

136.1

     
   

59,285.2

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL

Bank notes in circulation

 

55,411.1

Deposits

   

Government of Canada

2,658.8

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

31.1

 

Other deposits

637.9

 
   

3,327.8

Liabilities in foreign currencies

   

Government of Canada

   

Other

   
     

Other liabilities

   

Securities sold under

   

repurchase agreements

   

All other liabilities

416.3

 
   

416.3

     

59,155.2

Capital

   

Share capital and reserves

130.0

 

Retained earnings

4.1

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

(4.1)

 
     

130.0

     

59,285.2

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, August 16, 2010

R. J. WYTENBURG
Acting Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, August 16, 2010

M. CARNEY
Governor

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Footnote a
S.C. 1999, c. 33

Footnote b
SOR/94-311

Footnote c
S.C. 1999, c. 33

Footnote d
 S.C. 2004, c. 15, s. 11(1)

Footnote e
 R.S., c. A-2

Footnote f
 S.C. 2004, c. 15, s. 11(1)

Footnote g
 R.S., c. A-2

Footnote 1
Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998