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Vol. 144, No. 44 — October 30, 2010

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to section 127 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Disposal at Sea Permit No. 4543-2-06625 authorizing the loading for disposal and the disposal of waste or other matter at sea is amended as follows:

5. Disposal site(s): Ives Knoll, 44°37.88′ N, 63°33.12′ W (NAD83), as described in Appendix A, Figure 2, of the document titled “CEAA Environmental Screening Report Extension of Pier C at South End Container Terminal” (June 14, 2010) submitted in support of the permit application.

I. R. GEOFFREY MERCER
Regional Director
Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
Atlantic Region
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors (subsection 77(1) and paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Government of Canada published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on June 17, 2006, a Notice of Action Plan for the Assessment and Management of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and their Precursors, a key element of which is to pursue further assessment of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and precursor substances already in Canadian commerce in order to guide further risk management actions, as needed;

Whereas the 14 PFCA precursors set out in Annex 1 to this Notice are substances on the Domestic Substances List that were identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft ecological Screening Assessment of long-chain PFCAs that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors, conducted pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors meet at least one of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act; and

Whereas the Ministers are satisfied that, for long-chain PFCAs containing 11, 12 or 14 carbon atoms, and their salts, the criteria set out under subsection 77(4) of the Act are met,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that perfluorocarboxylic acids (linear or branched) which have the molecular formula CnF2n+1CO2H (where 8 ≤ n ≤ 20) and their salts be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is hereby also given that Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that compounds that contain a perfluorinated alkyl group (linear or branched) which has the formula CnF2n+1 (where 8 ≤ n ≤ 20) and which is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose the implementation of virtual elimination of perfluorocarboxylic acids (linear or branched) which have the molecular formula CnF2n+1CO2H (where n = 11, 12 or 14) and their salts, under subsection 65(3) of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have released a Risk Management Scope document for these substances to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a Risk Management Approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Minister proposes to take. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

GEORGE ENEI
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

MARGARET KENNY
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

Precursors to long-chain PFCAs identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS Registry Number1

Substance DSL2 Name

678-39-7

1-Decanol, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluoro-

65530-63-4

Ethanol, 2,2′ -iminobis-, compd. with α-fluoro-ω[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene) (2:1)

65530-66-7

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]-

65530-71-4

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-, monoammonium salt

65530-72-5

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-, diammonium salt

65530-74-7

Ethanol, 2,2′-iminobis-, compd. with α-fluoro-ω[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene) (1:1)

65605-58-5

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, dodecyl ester, polymer with α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene)

65605-70-1

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]-

65636-35-3

Ethanaminium, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo2-propenyl)oxy]-, methyl sulfate, polymer with 2-ethylhexyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene), 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and N-(hydroxymethyl)-2-propenamide

68239-43-0

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-ethylhexyl ester, polymer with α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene), 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and N-(hydroxymethyl)-2-propenamide

68391-08-2

Alcohols, C8-14, γ-ω-perfluoro

68412-68-0

Phosphonic acid, perfluoro-C6-12-alkyl derivs.

110053-43-5

Imidodicarbonic diamide, N,N′,2-tris(6-isocyanatohexyl)-, reaction products with 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol and α-fluoro-ω-(2-hydroxyethyl)poly(difluoromethylene)

115592-83-1

2-Propenoic acid, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,12-heneicosafluorododecyl ester, polymer with 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluorodecyl 2-propenoate, hexadecyl 2-propenoate, N-(hydroxymethyl)2-propenamide, octadecyl 2-propenoate, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,13,13,14,14,14-pentacosafluorotetradecyl 2-propenoate and 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluorooctyl 2-propenoate

1 CAS Registry Number: The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

2 DSL: Domestic Substances List

ANNEX 2

Summary of the draft ecological screening assessment report on long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors

Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Ministers of the Environment and of Health conducted an ecological screening assessment of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), their salts, and their precursors which were identified as emerging chemicals of concern. Empirical evidence demonstrated that some perfluorocarboxylic acids are bioaccumulative, persistent, subject to long-range transport (via precursors), widespread and showing a trend toward increasing concentrations in Arctic wildlife. The fact that some of the precursors to the long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids are also structurally similar to the four fluorotelomer-based substances prohibited by the Minister of the Environment under the authority of section 84 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 has contributed to the decision to undertake this ecological screening assessment of the long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids. As well, 14 precursors (listed in Annex 1) were deemed to meet the categorization criteria under section 73 of the Act.

This ecological assessment focuses on the perfluorocarboxylic acids with carbon chain lengths from 9 to 20 inclusive, their salts and their precursors. Precursors, i.e. substances that could transform or degrade to long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids, were considered on the basis of their contribution to the total presence of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids in the environment. This assessment defines precursors as any substances where the perfluorinated alkyl moiety has the formula CnF2n+1 (where 8 ≤ n ≤ 20) and is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom.

The presence of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids, their salts and their precursors result from anthropogenic activity. In 2000 and 2004, industry surveys by Environment Canada under the authority of section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 found that long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids were not reported to be manufactured or imported into Canada. However, in both surveys, several precursors to the long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids were reported to be imported into Canada.

In traditional toxicity studies, long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids were found to be low to moderately toxic, with acute toxicity values ranging from 8.8 to 285 mg/L. There are two studies on the toxicity of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids in terrestrial species. In one study, no adverse effects were observed up to 1.0 mg/kg body weight for male chickens dosed with C10 perfluorocarboxylic acid. In another study, a soil-dwelling nematode showed acute lethality at 306 mg/L and multi-generation effects (decreased fecundity) at 0.000464 mg/L when exposed to C9 perfluorocarboxylic acid.

There are other studies showing the potential for long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids to cause other types of effects. For example, although a direct causal relationship has not been demonstrated, liver lesions have been observed in wild polar bears cumulatively exposed to several long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids. C9 and C10 perfluorocarboxylic acids have been shown to affect the multi-xenobiotic resistance mechanism in marine mussels at concentrations ranging from 2.23 to 3.65 mg/L. C9 to C12 perfluorocarboxylic acids induced vitellogenesis in rainbow trout at 2.56 ´ 10-5 to 2 mg/g diet. C9 perfluorocarboxylic acid may cause oxidative stress in the common cormorant. C9 to C11 perfluorocarboxylic acids activated the peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα) in the livers of Baikal seals. The PPARα plays a critical physiological role as a lipid sensor and a regulator of lipid metabolism. C9-C10 PFCAs are also chemical sensitizers for the marine mussel, Mytilus californianus, by allowing normally excluded toxic substances to accumulate in the marine mussel. C12 and C14 PFCAs increased the mitochondrial membrane potential in the freshwater alga, Scenedesmus obliquus, indicating damage to the mitochondrial function.

There are no experimental persistence data, under environmentally relevant conditions, available for the long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids. However, the carbon-fluorine bond is one of the strongest in nature, making the structure extremely stable and resistant to degradation. The perfluorinated chain provides exceptional resistance to thermal and chemical attack. Thus, due to the strength of the carbon-fluorine bond, it is expected that long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids would be persistent. Furthermore, long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids have been detected in remote areas (e.g. the Canadian Arctic). While mechanisms of transport are not fully understood, certain precursors may undergo long-range transport to remote areas, where subsequent degradation can result in the formation of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids.

A bioaccumulation factor (BAF) or bioconcentration factor (BCF) > 5 000 has been demonstrated for C11, C12 and C14 perfluorocarboxylic acids. For C11, C12, and C14 perfluorocarboxylic acids, there is the potential for bioconcentration in fish (BCF > 5 000) and some potential for biomagnification in fish and marine mammals. However, there remains a significant potential for biomagnification and/or trophic magnification in water-breathing and air-breathing organisms for all long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids. There are no experimental or predicted bioaccumulation data available for long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids greater than C14; nevertheless, there is the potential that these longer chains could bioaccumulate or biomagnify in marine and/or terrestrial species based on chemical conformations. In addition, C15 perfluorocarboxylic acids have been measured in fish, invertebrates and polar bears.

C9 to C15 perfluorocarboxylic acids were measured in the liver of seals, foxes, fish, polar bears, Greenland sharks, narwhals, beluga whales and birds either in the Canadian Arctic or the Great Lakes region. Concentrations ranged from below detection levels to 180 ng/g liver wet weight, with concentrations greatest for polar bears followed by Greenland sharks, narwhals and beluga whales. Worldwide, C9 to C15 have been reported in ringed, fur and harbour seals, dolphins (i.e. white-sided, bottlenose, white-beaked, Franciscana, humpback), finless porpoises, glaucous gulls, sperm whales, beavers, Amur tigers, wild rats and several species of birds (Little Egret, Little Ringed Plover, Parrotbills, Black-crowned Herons). Concentrations ranged from below detection levels to 480 ng/g wet weight, with concentrations highest in the white-beaked dolphin.

From 1980 to 2000, levels of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids in ringed seal livers from Greenland increased 3.3% and 6.8% per year for C10 and C11, respectively. From 1992 to 2005, the mean concentrations of C9 and C10 PFCA in the livers of Baikal seals were 1.2 to 1.7-fold higher. From 1972 to 2002, mean doubling times for concentrations in polar bear livers from the Arctic ranged from 5.8 to 9.1 years for C9 to C11. From 1993 to 2004, concentrations in ringed seal liver samples increased, with a doubling time of 4 to 10 years for C9 to C12. In northern fulmar liver samples, C9 to C15 levels increased from 1987 to 1993 and remained steady from 1993 to 2003. Thick-billed murre liver samples showed an increase in C9 to C15 concentrations from 1975 to 2004. Concentrations of C9 to C13 increased significantly in whole eggs of Herring Gulls in Norway from 1983 to 1993. Male beluga whales from Nunavut showed an annual liver increase of 1.8 ng/g wet weight for C9-C12 from 1980–2010.

Long chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids are persistent in the environment and can bioaccumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals. Given these inherent properties, together with environmental concentrations that may approach effect levels (including for vitellogenin induction), increasing temporal trends for several Arctic species (i.e. the polar bear, seals and Arctic birds), their widespread occurrence in biota likely due to the long-range atmospheric or oceanic transport of volatile precursors and/or the acids themselves, and the fact that other perfluorinated compounds and precursors to long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids may contribute to the overall additive or synergistic impact of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids in biota, it is proposed that long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids, their salts and their precursors are entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity.

Where relevant, research and monitoring will support verification of assumptions used during the screening assessment and, where appropriate, the performance of potential control measures identified during the risk management phase.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids, their salts, and their precursors meet one or more of the criteria in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

The presence of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids and their salts results from human activity. In addition, long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids and their salts meet the criteria for persistence as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. While there is scientific evidence that long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids and their salts can accumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals, only C11, C12 and C14 perfluorocarboxylic acids and their salts meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

The draft ecological Screening Assessment as well as the draft Risk Management Scope document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), its salts and its precursors (subsection 77(1) and paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) salt and four PFOA precursors identified in Annex 1 to this Notice are substances on the Domestic Substances List that were identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on PFOA, its salts and its precursors pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby; and

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that PFOA, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that Perfluorooctanoic acid (linear or branched) and its salts be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that PFOA precursors which are compounds that contain a perfluorinated alkyl group which has the formula CnF2n+1 (where n = 7 or 8) and which is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom, be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have released a Risk Management Scope document for the substances to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a Risk Management Approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

GEORGE ENEI
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

MARGARET KENNY
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

PFOA Salt and Precursors Identified Under Subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS Registry Number1

Substance DSL2 name

PFOA salt

3825-26-1

Octanoic acid, pentadecafluoro-, ammonium salt

PFOA precursors

678-39-7

1-Decanol, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluoro

53515-73-4

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-pentadecafluorooctyl ester, polymer with 2-propenoic acid

65530-61-2

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-

70969-47-0

Thiols, C8-20, γ-ω-perfluoro, telomers with acrylamide

1 CAS Registry Number: The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

2 DSL: Domestic Substances List

ANNEX 2

Summary of the Screening Assessment of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), its Salts and its Precursors

Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 33567-1, its salts and its precursors under sections 68 and 74 of CEPA 1999. Some of these substances were categorized under section 73 of CEPA 1999. PFOA was also assessed due to its persistent nature, widespread occurrence in biota, presence in the Canadian Arctic due to long-range transport, and international interest in emerging science indicating a potential concern for the environment and human health from PFOA and its salts. In addition, precursors to PFOA were considered in this assessment on the basis of their contribution to the total presence of PFOA and its salts in the environment.

The substance PFOA is an anthropogenic substance belonging to a class of chemicals known as perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFCAs, in turn, belong to the broader class of chemicals known as perfluoroalkyls (PFAs). The term PFOA may refer to the acid, its conjugate base or its principal salt forms. Historical uses of PFOA include applications in industrial processes and in commercial and consumer products. It continues to be used as a reactive intermediate, with its salts used as processing aids in the production of fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. PFOA is not manufactured in Canada; however, quantities of the ammonium salt are imported.

Environment

The substance PFOA may be found in the environment due to releases from fluoropolymer manufacturing or processing facilities, effluent releases from wastewater treatment plants, landfill leachates and due to degradation/transformation of PFOA precursors. Such precursors may include parent compounds, chemical products containing PFOA (either as part of formulations or as unintended residuals) and substances transforming to intermediates that ultimately degrade to PFOA. Potential precursors also include related fluorochemicals (e.g. fluorotelomer alcohols [FTOHs], fluorotelomer iodides and fluorotelomer olefins), some of which are currently used and detectable in the atmosphere and can degrade or transform to PFOA through biotic or abiotic pathways.

Once in the environment, PFOA is persistent and not known to undergo any further abiotic or biotic degradation under relevant environmental conditions. PFOA is highly water soluble and typically present as an anion (conjugate base) in solution. It has low vapour pressure; therefore, the aquatic environment is expected to be its primary sink, with some additional partitioning to sediment. The presence of PFOA in the Canadian Arctic indicates the long-range transport of PFOA (e.g. via ocean currents) or of volatile precursors to PFOA (e.g. via atmospheric transport).

The substance PFOA has been detected at trace levels in the northern hemisphere. In North America, higher levels were measured in surface waters in the vicinity of U.S. fluoropolymer manufacturing facilities (<0.025–1 900 µg/L) and in groundwater near U.S. military bases (not detected [ND] to 6 570 µg/L). PFOA was detected in effluent from Canadian wastewater treatment facilities at concentrations ranging from 0.007 to 0.055 µg/L. PFOA was also detected in the influent at U.S. wastewater treatment facilities at concentrations ranging from 0.0074–0.089 µg/L.

Trace levels of PFOA have been measured in Canadian fresh water (ND–11.3 µg/L) and freshwater sediments (0.3–7.5 µg/kg). PFOA has also been detected in a variety of Canadian biota (ND–90 µg/kg wet weight [kg-ww] tissue) in southern Ontario and the Canadian Arctic. The highest concentration of PFOA in Canadian organisms was found in the benthic invertebrate Diporeia hoyi at 90 µg/kg-ww, followed by burbot liver at 26.5 µg/kg-ww, polar bear liver at 13 µg/kg-ww, caribou liver at 12.2 µg/kg-ww, ringed seal liver at 8.7 µg/kg-ww and walrus liver at 5.8 µg/kg-ww. Following a spill of fire-fighting foam in Etobicoke Creek, Ontario, PFOA was measured in common shiner liver at a maximum of 91 µg/kg-ww. However, current PFOA concentrations in Canadian biota (tissue specific and whole body) are below the highest concentration found in U.S. biota (up to 1 934.5 µg/kg-ww in gar liver).

Temporal or spatial trends in PFOA concentrations in guillemot eggs, lake trout, thick-billed murres, northern fulmars or ringed seals could not be determined. However, temporal trends were found for PFOA concentrations in polar bears and sea otters. PFOA doubling time in liver tissue was calculated to be 7.3 (± 2.8) years for Baffin Island polar bears and 13.9 (± 14.2) years for Barrow polar bears in Alaska; central East Greenland polar bears showed an annual increase of 2.3% in PFOA concentrations. Concentrations of PFOA also increased significantly over a 10-year period for adult female sea otters.

Unlike other organic pollutants that are persistent and found in biota, certain perfluorinated substances, such as PFOA, are present mainly as ions in environmental media. Due to the perfluorination, the hydrocarbon chains are oleophilic and hydrophobic and the perfluorinated chains are both oleophobic and hydrophobic. PFOA primarily binds to proteins in biota and preferentially partitions to liver, blood and kidney rather than to lipid tissue. The numeric criteria for bioaccumulation, outlined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999, are based on bioaccumulation data for aquatic species (fish) only and for substances that preferentially partition to lipids. As a result, the criteria do not account for the bioaccumulation of PFOA that is preferentially partitioning in the proteins of liver, blood and kidney in terrestrial and marine mammals. There is experimental evidence indicating that PFOA is not highly bioaccumulative in fish. Reported laboratory bioconcentration factors for fish species (primarily rainbow trout) ranged from 3.1–27. In the pelagic aquatic food web of Lake Ontario, two studies indicate that PFOA concentrations do not biomagnify with increasing trophic level. However, these results should not be extrapolated to other species, since gills provide an additional mode of elimination for PFOA that air-breathing organisms, such as terrestrial and marine mammals, do not possess. Field studies indicating biomagnification factors greater than 1 for Arctic and other mammals (such as narwhal, beluga, polar bear, walrus, bottlenose dolphins, and harbour seals) suggest that PFOA may bioaccumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals. Reported field biomagnification factors for terrestrial and marine mammals ranged from 0.03–31. Polar bears, as the apex predator in the Arctic marine food web, have been shown to be the most contaminated with PFOA relative to other Arctic terrestrial organisms.

In traditional toxicity studies, PFOA exhibits moderate to low acute toxicities in pelagic organisms, including fish (70–2 470 mg/L). PFOA exhibits low chronic toxicities in benthic organisms (>100 mg/L). There is one study on the toxicity of PFOA and its salts in avian wildlife. In this study, PFOA was found to have no effect on embryonic pipping success for white leghorn chickens at concentrations up to 10 µg/g. However, PFOA accumulated in the liver of these embryos to concentrations greater than the initial whole-egg concentration.

There are studies showing the potential for PFOA to affect endocrine function where visible effects may not be apparent until the organisms reach adulthood. In female and male rare minnows, 3–30 mg/L PFOA elicited inhibition of the thyroid hormone biosynthesis genes, induced vitellogenin expression in males, developed oocytes in the testes of male fish and caused ovary degeneration in females.

There are other studies showing hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and chemosensitivity. For example, a PFOA concentration of 0.02 µg/L increased the chemosensitivity in marine mussels. PFOA, at 25.9 mg/L, activated the mammalian peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα) in the livers of Baikal seals — PPARα plays a critical physiological role as a lipid sensor and a regulator of lipid metabolism. Field data also reveal that there may be increases in indicators of inflammation and immunity in bottlenose dolphins related to PFOA concentrations, suggesting possible autoimmune effects. Another field study has also suggested that low levels of PFOA may alter biomarkers of health in loggerhead sea turtles.

The substance PFOA is persistent in all media in the environment and can bioaccumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals. Given these inherent properties of PFOA, together with environmental concentrations that may approach effect levels affecting endocrine function (including vitellogenin induction, feminization in male fish, ovary degeneration in female fish and hepatotoxicity), current temporal trends of PFOA in polar bears, the widespread occurrence of PFOA in biota, including in remote areas, and the fact that other PFAs and precursors to PFOA may contribute to the overall additive or synergistic impact of PFOA in biota, it is proposed to conclude that PFOA, its salts and its precursors are entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity.

Human health

In humans, PFOA is well absorbed by all routes of exposure; it has not been demonstrated to be metabolized and has a relatively long half-life. Salts of PFOA are expected to dissociate in biological media to produce the perfluorooctanoate (PFO) moiety, and are therefore considered toxicologically equivalent to PFOA. Low concentrations of PFOA have been identified in blood samples from non-occupationally exposed Canadians, including newborns, indicating environmental exposure to PFOA and/or compounds that can degrade to PFOA. The available data indicate that Canadians are exposed to PFOA and its precursors in the environment, including via air, drinking water and food; and from the use of consumer products, such as new non-stick cookware and perfluorinated compound (PFC)-treated apparel and household materials such as carpets and upholstery. Canadians are also potentially exposed to PFOA in utero and through lactational transfer. The relative contributions of PFOA and its salts and precursors to total PFOA exposure were not characterized; rather, the focus was on aggregate exposure to the moiety of toxicological concern, PFOA.

Epidemiological studies have not identified a causal relationship between PFOA exposure and adverse health effects in humans. Therefore, toxicity studies in laboratory animals were used to determine the critical effects and associated serum levels of PFOA. Following oral dosing of PFOA ammonium salt (APFO), increased liver weight in mice and altered lipid parameters in rats were observed in short-term (14-day) toxicity studies, increased liver weight was noted in a 26-week toxicity study in monkeys; and increased liver weight in dams, alterations in fetal ossification and early puberty in male pups were found in a developmental toxicity study in mice.

In two-year carcinogenicity bioassays in rats, males that were administered a high dose of APFO in the diet had significantly higher incidences of adenomas of the liver hepatocytes, Leydig cells in the testes and pancreatic acinar cells. No evidence of carcinogenic activity was seen in the female rats. Liver tumours in male rats may be induced via liver toxicity resulting from PFOA-induced peroxisome proliferation, and additional pathways secondary to peroxisome proliferation may be involved in the generation of tumours at other sites. As primates are much less susceptible than rodents to peroxisome proliferation, the PFOA-induced tumours in male rats are considered to have little or no relevance for humans. Although blood levels of PFOA were not determined in the chronic studies, the oral dose of APFO was several times higher than those in the critical short-term and subchronic studies. Although there is some evidence to suggest that PFOA may be capable of causing indirect oxidative DNA damage, the genotoxicity database indicates that PFOA is not mutagenic. Thus, as the tumours observed in male rats are not considered to have resulted from direct interaction with genetic material, a threshold approach is used to assess risk to human health.

The assessment of PFOA is based on a comparison of the margin between the levels of PFOA in the blood (serum) of humans and serum levels that are associated with the development of adverse effects in laboratory animals. This approach aggregates exposure to PFOA from all sources, including those resulting from releases from fluoropolymer manufacturing or processing facilities, effluent releases from sewage treatment plants, landfill effluents, or degradation/transformation of PFOA precursors.

Comparison of the PFOA serum levels associated with adverse effects in laboratory animals (13–77 µg/mL) with the serum levels found in non-occupationally exposed adults and in children (0.0034–0.010 µg/mL) results in margins of exposure of ≥1 300. These margins are considered to be adequately protective to account for uncertainties in the hazard and exposure databases.

Based on the available information on the potential to cause harm to human health and the resulting margins of exposure, it is proposed to conclude that PFOA and its salts are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health. Precursors of PFOA were not individually assessed, but were considered in terms of their contribution to total PFOA exposure because they can degrade to PFOA in the environment.

Where relevant, research and monitoring will support verification of assumptions used during the screening assessment and, where appropriate, the performance of potential control measures identified during the risk management phase.

Proposed conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that PFOA, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

PFOA is highly persistent in the environment and meets the criteria for persistence as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. While there is scientific evidence that PFOA and its salts can accumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals, PFOA and its salts do not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the draft Risk Management Scope document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bacon, Stewart

2010-1261

Canada Post Corporation

 

Acting President

 

Government of Ontario

 

Administrators

 

O’Connor, The Hon. Dennis R.

2010-1256

October 25 to 29, 2010

 

Smith, The Hon. Heather J.

2010-1256

October 18 to 22, 2010

 

Weiler, The Hon. Karen M.

2010-1255

October 13 to 15, 2010

 

Jackson, Richard W.

2010-1260

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time member

 

Murphy, The Hon. Michele M.

2010-1257

Government of Prince Edward Island

 

Administrator

 

October 21 and 22, 2010

 

Thibault, The Hon. France

2010-1248

Government of Quebec

 

Administrator

 

Watson, The Hon. Jack

2010-1254

Government of Alberta

 

Administrator

 

October 11 and 12, 2010

 

October 21, 2010

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Application for surrender of charter

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of subsection 32(2) of the Canada Corporations Act, an application for surrender of charter was received from

File No.

Name of Company

Received

420224-4

LETHBRIDGE EMERGENCY RESEARCH NETWORK

05/10/2010

409609-6

Obesity Incorporated O.B.C.T.
L’obésité Incorporée O.B.C.T.

15/09/2010

406634-1

PETER AND MARLA VERES CHARITABLE FOUNDATION/
FONDATION CHARITABLE PETER ET MARLA VERES

13/10/2010

339338-1

THE CENTRE OF RESEARCH IN EARTH AND SPACE TECHNOLOGY

21/09/2010

454074-3

United Macedonian Diaspora (Canada) /
Diaspora macédoniens unis (Canada)

18/10/2010

October 22, 2010

AÏSSA AOMARI
Director
Incorporation and Information
Products and Services Directorate
For the Minister of Industry

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Head Office

Effective Date

759895-5

A LIFE WELL LIVED FOUNDATION

City of Edmonton, Alta.

10/08/2010

761488-8

AAGNAC INC.

London, Ont.

24/08/2010

763352-1

ACTION HAITI

City of Calgary, Alta.

09/09/2010

761511-6

AIDWATCH CANADA

City of Ottawa, Ont.

30/08/2010

759863-7

AIRPORTS COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL
CONSEIL INTERNATIONAL DES AÉROPORTS

City of Montréal, Que.

09/08/2010

763340-8

ANISHNAWBE HEALTH FOUNDATION

City of Toronto, Ont.

07/09/2010

759919-6

ANSWERING T.T.P. (THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA) FOUNDATION

City of Toronto, Ont.

24/08/2010

763384-0

Atlantic Canada Trails Association

City of Bathurst, N.B.

15/09/2010

759736-3

BSDLC ORGANIZATION

Scarborough, Ont.

21/07/2010

759923-4

BubblesMakeHimSmile.com

Burnaby, B.C.

25/08/2010

759402-0

CANADA-ALBANIA BUSINESS COUNCIL /
CONSEIL COMMERCIAL CANADA-ALBANIA

Montréal, Que.

03/09/2010

759714-2

CANADA CHINESE REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE ASSOCIATION

Markham, Ont.

16/07/2010

763388-2

CANADA KOREA FOUNDATION

Greater Vancouver Regional District, B.C.

21/09/2010

761482-9

CANADA WEST AEROSPACE & DEFENCE INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

Vancouver, B.C.

19/08/2010

759909-9

CANADA ZHEJIANG COUNCIL OF COMMERCE

Toronto, Ont.

20/08/2010

763348-3

Canadian Association of University Professors in Refractive Surgery / Association canadienne des professeurs universitaires en chirurgie réfractive

Montréal, Que.

09/09/2010

763381-5

CANADIAN ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENT FOUNDATION

City of Toronto, Ont.

20/09/2010

759860-2

CANADIAN MILITARY ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION ASSOCIATION DU GENIE MILITAIRE CANADIEN

Ottawa, Ont.

09/08/2010

757975-6

CANADIAN SIKH COALITION

Surrey, B.C.

04/08/2010

763467-6

CDG-COSMETIC DENTISTRY GRANTS ORGANIZATION

Toronto, Ont.

16/09/2010

753051-0

COMEUNITY

Ottawa, Ont.

29/04/2010

753689-5

Diamond Vérité Canada

Toronto, Ont.

06/05/2010

764603-8

DIAMOND DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE CANADA/
L’INITIATIVE DIAMANT ET DÉVELOPPEMENT CANADA

City of Ottawa, Ont.

28/09/2010

761472-1

DIVINE DESTINY

Toronto, Ont.

17/08/2010

763345-9

FESTCARIBBEAN INC.

Brantford, Ont.

08/09/2010

759371-6

FILLE DE MARIE REINE DES APOTRES DE KABINDA (F.M.R.A.)

Ottawa (Ont.)

19/07/2010

763414-5

FONDATION CHEVALION

Denholm (Qc)

31/08/2010

759907-2

FONDATION CHRÉTIENNE PRIMITIVE DE L’ONTARIO

Ottawa (Ont.)

20/08/2010

764637-2

GOULBURN GIRLS HOCKEY ASSOCIATION

City of Ottawa, Ont.

05/10/2010

763371-8

GROUPE VAILLANTS SOLDATS DE JÉSUS-CHRIST

Montréal (Qc)

17/09/2010

754730-7

IFAC INTERFAITH ASSEMBLY OF CANADA

City of Toronto, Ont.

27/05/2010

763433-1

INSCEPTION PUBLIC CORD BLOOD PROGRAM INC.

City of Mississauga, Ont.

08/09/2010

763355-6

INTERNATIONAL SURGICAL HEALTH INITIATIVES (CANADA) INC. INITIATIVES INTERNATIONALES DE CHIRURGIE ET DE SANTÉ (CANADA) INC.

Beaconsfield, Que.

10/09/2010

763329-7

Jordanian Canadian Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Mississauga, Ont.

02/09/2010

765993-8

JUSTICE CENTRE FOR CONSTITUTIONAL FREEDOMS

Calgary, Alta.

04/10/2010

759759-2

KATCHI

Ottawa, Ont.

26/07/2010

763339-4

LA CORPORATION DE LA TÉLÉVISION FRANCOPHONIE CANADIENNE - ACCENTS

Ottawa (Ont.)

07/09/2010

763324-6

LE FONDS STÉPHANIE GRAVEL

Montréal (Qc)

01/09/2010

759750-9

LE MOUVEMENT DES ARTS BURLESQUES DE MONTRÉAL/ BURLESQUE ART MOVEMENT OF MONTREAL

Montréal (Qc)

23/07/2010

752011-5

LOGOS BAPTIST CHURCH JOINT MISSION (LBC-JM)

Markham, Ont.

26/04/2010

763335-1

LORD STANLEY MEMORIAL MONUMENT INC./
MONUMENT MÉMORIAL LORD STANLEY INC.

City of Ottawa, Ont.

03/09/2010

763451-0

LOVEGLOBAL FUND

Greater Vancouver Regional District, B.C.

07/09/2010

763387-4

McDermott House Canada Maison McDermott Canada

City of Toronto, Ont.

21/09/2010

763394-7

MEDICAL MARIJUANA ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

Calgary, Alta.

22/09/2010

759739-8

MEDICRUISER INTERNATIONAL

London, Ont.

21/07/2010

759905-6

MINISTÈRES CÉTUDE PIERRE MINISTRIES

Région métropolitaine d’Ottawa (Ont.)

20/08/2010

763349-1

MONTREAL INTERNATIONAL POETRY PRIZE/ PRIX DE POÉSIE INTERNATIONALE DE MONTRÉAL

Montréal, Que.

09/09/2010

763336-0

MOTHER HEALTH INTERNATIONAL

Argenta, B.C.

07/09/2010

765377-8

MY JAMAICAN HEAVEN
FOUNDATION /
FONDATION MON PARADIS JAMAÏCAIN

Montréal, Que.

08/10/2010

759940-4

NATIONAL ALGAE BIOMASS ASSOCIATION

City of London, Ont.

30/08/2010

763393-9

NEW CO PROPANE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

City of Ottawa, Ont.

22/09/2010

759870-0

OIL FOR CHANGE ASSOCIATION INC.

Winnipeg, Man.

16/09/2010

759906-4

UNITED WEALTH AND PROSPERITY FUND

Greater Montréal Area, Que.

20/08/2010

454007-7

OITC - OM4YOUTH

Kingston, Ont.

01/10/2010

759747-9

OPTICIANS COUNCIL OF CANADA INC.

Winnipeg, Man.

23/07/2010

759937-4

Outreach Zanzibar Foundation

Toronto, Ont.

30/08/2010

767193-8

Pat the Dog Playwright Centre

Waterloo, Ont.

18/10/2010

765941-5

PATIENTS’ ASSOCIATION OF CANADA/
ASSOCIATION DES PATIENTS DU CANADA

Toronto, Ont.

18/10/2010

756556-9

PINEGROVE FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH

Town of Bracebridge, District of Muskoka, Ont.

28/06/2010

763323-8

PLANET POUNDS

Ottawa, Ont.

01/09/2010

763380-7

PMHF Partners for Mental Health Foundation
FPSM Fondation partenaires pour la santé mentale

City of Ottawa, Ont.

20/09/2010

759420-8

Professional Surveyors Canada Géomètres professionnels du Canada

Ottawa, Ont.

05/08/2010

759719-3

QUICKENING THEATRE CORP.

Stratford, Ont.

16/07/2010

758010-0

RABINIRJHAR

Toronto, Ont.

06/07/2010

759910-2

Relationship Model International

City of Regina, Sask.

20/08/2010

763418-8

RMF CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

City of Edmonton, Alta.

30/08/2010

750159-5

Save My Child International Inc.

City of Toronto, Ont.

06/04/2010

763363-7

SCHOLMARK FOUNDATION

City of Toronto, Ont.

13/09/2010

757977-2

SIKH INFORMATION CENTRE

Surrey, B.C.

04/08/2010

763338-6

SOCCER FRATERNITÉ MONTRÉAL

Montréal (Qc)

07/09/2010

789894-7

SOCIÉTÉ DE GESTION MAMO MAMO MANAGEMENT CORPORATION

Réserve indienne de Wendake (Qc)

17/08/2010

763326-2

SPIRITUAL EMOTIONAL MENTAL and PHYSICAL CENTER (S.E.M.P.C.)

Montréal, Que.

02/09/2010

759900-5

Stolen From Africa / Volé D’Afrique

Toronto, Ont.

19/08/2010

763405-6

SUR LA MONTAGNE ÉLEVÉE DE DIEU ON THE HIGH MOUNTAIN OF GOD

Sherbrooke (Qc)

16/09/2010

763385-8

the equality effect

City of Toronto, Ont.

21/09/2010

759922-6

The Akademy Federal (Snowboard)

Richmond, B.C.

24/08/2010

763351-3

The Akiva and Bilah Medjuck Foundation

Toronto, Ont.

08/09/2010

759748-7

The Food and Water Institute

Toronto, Ont.

23/07/2010

763362-9

The Hidden Faith Project /
Projet Hidden Faith

Montréal, Que.

13/09/2010

763341-6

The World on my Plate

Toronto, Ont.

07/09/2010

759898-0

THE IMPACT INSTITUTE FOR THE DIGITAL ECONOMY

City of Ottawa, Ont.

18/08/2010

759389-9

THE LEGACY VOICES INSTITUTE/ INSTITUT LES VOIX DE NOTRE HISTOIRE

Toronto, Ont.

26/07/2010

759897-1

THE VIENNESE OPERA BALL

City of Ottawa, Ont.

18/08/2010

455370-5

TRENDS: Young Women’s Fashion Alliance of Canada
STYLE: l’Alliance des jeunes canadiennes pour la mode

Mill Bay, B.C.

17/09/2010

759914-5

UCAN TRUST

City of Mississauga, Ont.

23/08/2010

759396-1

UNIMA-CANADA

Montréal, Que.

28/07/2010

754366-2

UNION POUR LA PROMOTION DE LA FEMME AFRICAINE (UPFA)

Ottawa (Ont.)

20/05/2010

759876-9

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS AND SKILLED WORKERS ASSOCIATION

Toronto, Ont.

12/08/2010

756526-7

ZIMBABWE AFRICAN PEOPLE’S UNION

Ottawa, Ont.

16/06/2010

October 22, 2010

AÏSSA AOMARI
Director
Incorporation and Information
Products and Services Directorate
For the Minister of Industry

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

346973-5

ARBITRATION AND MEDIATION INSTITUTE FOUNDATION FONDATION DE L’INSTITUT D’ARBITRAGE ET DE MÉDIATION

27/09/2010

423106-6

BANFF TELEVISION FESTIVAL FOUNDATION

14/10/2010

454872-8

BIBLIODIGIT LETTRES & SCIENCES

01/09/2010

297003-1

CANADIAN FRIENDS OF FINLAND (OTTAWA)

23/08/2010

442022-5

CENTRE SOCIO-CULTUREL SHEKINAH

02/09/2010

401948-2

COLON CANCER CANADA /
CANCER DU COLON CANADA

09/09/2010

443077-8

Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services Inc./
Commissaire aux plaintes relatives aux services de télécommunications inc.

01/06/2010

451113-1

CQDM - CONSORTIUM QUÉBÉCOIS SUR LA DÉCOUVERTE DU MÉDICAMENT (FÉDÉRAL)

09/09/2010

350393-3

FONDATION DES FRANCOPHONES DE LA COLOMBIE-BRITANNIQUE

20/05/2010

444742-5

HAIDA GWAII TLUU

24/09/2010

453487-5

INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH SYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY

08/09/2010

046333-7

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE ON ENGLISH IN THE LITURGY, INC.

28/09/2010

447573-9

KEREN HABINYAN D’SATMAR FUND/
LE FONDS KEREN HABINYAN D’SATMAR

09/09/2010

454609-1

MICHAELLE JEAN FOUNDATION FONDATION MICHAELLE JEAN

27/09/2010

450392-9

Opportunities for Kids

27/08/2010

255079-2

Ottawa Tourism and Convention Authority, Inc./ L’Administration du tourisme et des congrès
d’Ottawa, inc.

17/09/2010

444748-4

PLACE OF RESCUE FOUNDATION

28/07/2010

452472-1

Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation of Canada Fondation Canadienne de la Polykystose Rénale

17/09/2010

340138-3

RE:SOUND/ RÉ:SONNE

16/09/2010

168969-0

S-Vox Foundation

23/09/2010

450510-7

THE CLAC FOUNDATION

20/08/2010

451965-5

THE LEAGUE OF ORDINARY GENTLEMEN

17/09/2010

448480-1

UNDER THE SAME SUN FOUNDATION

27/09/2010

October 22, 2010

AÏSSA AOMARI
Director
Incorporation and Information
Products and Services Directorate
For the Minister of Industry

[44-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent — Name change

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Old Name of Company

New Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

448341-3

4483413 Association Inc.

TOM BOWEN HERITAGE FOUNDATION INC.

21/09/2010

373140-5

ACCREDITATION COUNCIL FOR CANADIAN PHYSIOTHERAPY ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Physiotherapy Education Accreditation Canada /
Agrément de l’enseignement de la physiothérapie au Canada

28/07/2010

194122-4

C.E.A.D. DIFFUSION

Fondation du Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD)

07/09/2010

303145-4

Canada-South Africa Chamber of Business

CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA CHAMBER OF BUSINESS

20/09/2010

425652-2

Canadian Chapter of the Society for Vascular Nursing

Canadian Society of Vascular Nursing

08/09/2010

438746-5

Centre for ADHD Advocacy, Canada

Centre for ADD/ADHD Awareness, Canada

27/09/2010

296063-0

CHAPITRE QUÉBÉCOIS DE L’ASSOCIATION AMÉRICAINE DU RETARD MENTAL - (AAMR QUÉBEC)
QUEBEC CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION ON MENTAL RETARDATION (AAMR QUEBEC)

AAIDD Chapitre Québec -
AAIDD Quebec Chapter

10/08/2010

277758-4

FONDATION DU CONSEIL DES GOUVERNEURS DU CENTRE DE RECHERCHE ET DE DÉVELOPPEMENT SUR LES ALIMENTS INC.

Fondation Initia

16/07/2010

188740-8

FONDATION INTÉGRACTION DU QUÉBEC/
INTEGRACTION FOUNDATION OF QUEBEC

Fondation Le Pilier

21/09/2010

173327-3

HELP THE AGED (CANADA) AIDE AUX AINES (CANADA)

HelpAge Canada -
Aide aux Aînés (Canada)

14/09/2010

372422-1

HURONIA COMMUNITIES FOUNDATION /
LA FONDATION COMMUNAUTAIRE DE LA HURONIE

Huronia Community Foundation /
La Fondation Communautaire de la Huronie

13/09/2010

446676-4

LAWYERS AID CANADA AIDE DES AVOCATS CANADA

JusticeNet

04/10/2010

450392-9

OPPORTUNITIES FOR KIDS IN CARE FOUNDATION

Opportunities for Kids

27/08/2010

380165-9

Parkdale/Liberty Economic Development Corporation

Parkdale Community Development Group

15/09/2010

391379-1

PHARE JEUNESSE

MISSION ABONDANTE DE LA NOUVELLE GÉNÉRATION

02/06/2010

433216-4

PUBLIC GOODS FOUNDATION

CYCLEBETES FOUNDATION

23/09/2010

448707-9

PublicCommons

GREEN ACTION PRIORITIES

10/09/2010

428172-1

Canadian Women’s Community Economic Development Council
Le Conseil pan-canadien du développement économique communautaire des femmes

Women’s Economic Council /
Conseil économique des femmes

23/08/2010

015439-3

THE GUILD OF CANADIAN FILM COMPOSERS/
LA GUILDE DE COMPOSITEURS DE FILM CANADIEN

Screen Composers Guild of Canada /
Guilde des Compositeurs Canadiens de Musique à l’Image

29/09/2010

454069-7

THE TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION AND GRADUATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOUNDATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

The Alacrity Foundation of B.C.

16/09/2010

168969-0

VISION TV: CANADA’S FAITH NETWORK/ RESEAU RELIGIEUX CANADIEN

S-Vox Foundation

23/07/2010

October 22, 2010

AÏSSA AOMARI
Director
Incorporation and Information
Products and Services Directorate
For the Minister of Industry

[44-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR FEDERAL JUDICIAL AFFAIRS

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs (full-time position)

Location: National Capital Region Salary: $165,400 to $194,700

The Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs (FJA) was established in 1978 under an Act of the Parliament of Canada to safeguard the independence of the judiciary and put federally appointed judges at arm’s length from the Department of Justice.

The Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs is deputy head of the Office, reports to Parliament through the Minister of Justice and acts on behalf of the Minister in matters related to the administration of Part I of the Judges Act. The Commissioner is responsible for the effective and efficient operation and management of the Office in providing services to the federal judiciary pursuant to the Commissioner’s statutory obligations and consistent with the mandate of the Office.

The successful candidate must have a Bachelor of Laws from a recognized university and be eligible for membership in the Bar of one of the provinces or territories of Canada or in the Order of Notaries in the Province of Quebec. The chosen candidate must have significant management experience at the senior executive level in a public or private sector organization, including the management of human and financial resources. Demonstrated decision-making experience at a senior level with respect to the administration of sensitive issues as well as experience providing strategic advice on complex and sensitive issues is required. The selected candidate should have experience in the administration of discretionary aspects of legislation, regulations and policies. Experience dealing with senior members of the judiciary and judicial organizations, and experience in the operations of government and in dealing with other departments, in particular central agencies, preferably at the senior level, would be considered assets. Experience in leading or contributing to international projects involving the judiciary would also be an asset.

The suitable candidate will have knowledge of the mandate, role and responsibilities of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs, as well as of the legislative and regulatory framework and mandate established by the Judges Act and regulations. Knowledge of the principles of judicial independence, and in particular in relation to the constitutional role of the superior court judiciary in Canadian society and its relationship with Parliament and the Government, is required. The ideal candidate will have knowledge of sound and probative public management practices, particularly in relation to fiscal and budgetary matters, as well as of the operations of the federal government.

The successful candidate will possess superior communications skills, both written and oral, sound judgment, adhere to high ethical standards and have the ability to develop and maintain appropriate and effective liaison with Chief Justices, judges and other representatives of the judiciary in relation to compensation benefits and related services. The ability to work collaboratively and collegially with officials of other judicial organizations and with senior officials from across government, in particular to secure necessary resources and services for the judiciary, most notably from the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Department of Finance and the Department of Justice, is required. The selected candidate must have the ability to balance competing interests and to respond to time-sensitive, externally driven demands. The chosen candidate must also have the ability to analyze differing opinions and complex situations with a view to making recommendations that are fair and equitable. Discretion, integrity, objectivity, as well as excellent interpersonal skills are also required.

Proficiency in both official languages is essential.

The successful candidate must be prepared to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical Guidelines for Public Office Holders and the Guidelines for the Political Activities of Public Office Holders. The guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a Confidential Report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.fja.gc.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by November 15, 2010, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@bnet.pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

Bilingual notices of vacancies will be produced in alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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