ARCHIVED — Supplement — July 14, 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Part Ⅰ — Introduction
  2. Part Ⅱ — Proposed Boundaries
  3. Part Ⅲ — Notice of Public Hearings
  4. Part ⅠV — Rules for Public Hearings
  5. Part V — Maps, Proposed Boundaries and Names of Electoral Districts
  6. Maps

FEDERAL ELECTORAL BOUNDARIES COMMISSION
FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA

PROPOSAL

Part Ⅰ — Introduction

The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Alberta (the “Commission”) has been established pursuant to the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. E-3, as amended (the “Act”).

The Canadian Constitution requires a readjustment of the total number of members of the House of Commons and of each province following each decennial census. The formula and rules provided in sections 51 and 51A of the Constitution Act, 1867 (the “Constitution”) govern this readjustment. As a result, federal electoral boundaries must be adjusted every 10 years to accommodate new electoral districts and the population shifts and changes within the province since the last decennial census.

The Act requires establishment of an independent, three-person commission in each province to define the sizes, boundaries and names of the electoral districts within that province. The chief justice of the province appoints the chair of the commission and the Speaker of the House of Commons appoints the other two members.

The 2012 Commission for Alberta was established by proclamation on February 21, 2012. The Chair of the Commission is Madam Justice Carole Conrad, of the Court of Appeal of Alberta, and the other members are Mr. Edwin Eggerer, of Airdrie, and Ms. Donna R. Wilson, of Edmonton.

Alberta’s population count increased from 2,974,807 to 3,645,257 between the 2001 and the 2011 censuses. Application of the formula and rules contained in the Constitution resulted in an increase in the total number of seats in the House of Commons from 308 to 338 and an increase in the total number for Alberta from 28 to 34.

The electoral quota for each Alberta electoral district is 107,213. This number is obtained by dividing the 2011 Alberta census population count of 3,645,257 by 34, the number of House of Commons seats allocated to Alberta. Alberta has the highest electoral quota in Canada.

Principles Governing the Commission

When readjusting the electoral boundaries, the Commission is governed by the principles set forth in the Act. Paragraph 15(1)(a) of the Act provides that the division of the province into electoral districts and the description of the boundaries shall proceed on the basis that the population of each electoral district shall, as closely as reasonably possible, correspond to the electoral quota for the province.

Paragraph 15(1)(b) of the Act provides that the Commission shall also consider the following criteria:

  • (i) the community of interest or community of identity in or the historical pattern of an electoral district in the province, and
  • (ii) a manageable geographic size for districts in sparsely populated, rural or northern regions of the province.

The Commission may deviate from strict electoral parity where it considers it necessary or desirable to do so in order to respect or maintain these criteria, provided that deviation from the provincial quota shall only exceed 25% more or less in circumstances the Commission considers extraordinary (subsection 15(2) of the Act).

The electoral quota for Alberta is 107,213. It follows that, absent extraordinary circumstances, Alberta’s electoral districts should not exceed a maximum electoral district population of 134,016 or a minimum population of 80,410.

In summary, the overarching principle of the Act is to ensure that each electoral district shall, as closely as reasonably possible, correspond to the electoral quota for the province, often referred to as population parity. When drawing the boundaries, the Commission must consider communities of interest or identity, historical patterns and geographic size. Where the Commission determines that it is either necessary or desirable to deviate from population parity, it has the discretion to do so within the limits of the legislation set out in the Act.

Statement of Process for Adjusting Boundaries

The process for readjustment of electoral boundaries can be briefly summarized.

The Commission prepares boundaries for electoral districts, which are contained in a proposed redistribution plan. Advertisement in the Canada Gazette and in at least one newspaper of general circulation will include a map showing the proposed electoral districts and provide notice of the time and place fixed for public hearings. Notice of intention to make representations on the proposed electoral districts must be given in writing to the Commission within 23 days of the publication of the last advertisement. Rules governing appearance at a public hearing are contained in the Commission’s proposed redistribution plan.

Following the public hearings, the Commission reviews its proposed redistribution plan, makes revisions, and submits its final report to the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. In Alberta, the final report is due by December 21, 2012.

The Commission’s report is sent to the House of Commons, where it is referred to a parliamentary committee. Once considered, it is referred back to the Commission. The Commission considers any objections, makes any modifications it deems necessary and provides a final certified copy of its report to the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, with or without amendment. Upon receipt of reports from all provinces, a draft order (referred to as the representation order) is prepared, describing and naming the electoral districts established by all the commissions.

Within five days of receiving the representation order, the Governor in Council must proclaim the order in force, effective on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least seven months after the day on which the proclamation was issued. As such, the new boundaries can only be used for a general election called at least seven months after the representation order is proclaimed.

Part Ⅱ — Proposed Boundaries

Overview and Explanations

Population shifts and the creation of 6 new electoral districts have resulted in a new electoral district landscape for Alberta. As one electoral boundary was drawn, an adjacent electoral district was inevitably impacted. In the result, all electoral districts in Alberta have been altered — some more substantially than others.

The Commission found no extraordinary circumstances requiring deviation from the electoral quota by more than the 25% contemplated by subsection 15(2) of the Act. The largest electoral district recommended has a 2011 decennial population of 111,917, which is 4.39% above the electoral quota. The smallest population recommended has a 2011 decennial census count of 102,272, which is 4.61% below the electoral quota. All proposed districts are within 5% of the electoral quota.

The Commission is aware of its right to deviate further from the electoral quota, but found it neither necessary, nor desirable, to do so. After consideration of the criteria enumerated in section 15 of the Act, the Commission is satisfied that effective representation can occur within the proposed boundaries.

The Commission was governed by its constitutional and statutory obligations in preparing its proposed redistribution plan. As required by section 15 of the Act, the Commission considered the geographic size, community of interest or community of identity in, and the historical pattern of, each electoral district in determining whether deviation from the electoral quota was either necessary or desirable. The Commission considered the topography of each district and the impact of its geographic size on representation of any district, particularly in the northern and less populated areas.

Ms. Joanne Gérémian, a skillful geography specialist, worked with the Commission. In addition, the Commission had access to data from the Department of Natural Resources and the Chief Statistician of Canada. Population figures are based on the 2011 census, as provided by Statistics Canada. The Commission considered existing federal electoral, provincial electoral, county and municipal boundaries and made efforts to follow such boundaries where convenient and considered desirable.

By use of its website, the Commission invited brief comments and suggestions from the public. This was not intended as a substitute for the full public hearings, which will occur following publication of this proposed redistribution plan. The Commission appreciates the many comments, recommended maps and recommendations received. These comments identified many issues which were discussed and considered.

In determining the names of the electoral districts, the Commission chose names meant to reflect an identifying physical or historical site, object or geographical feature of the electoral districts. Following the federal guidelines, where an electoral district was substantially altered, a new name was selected. Considering that most electoral districts are comprised of multiple communities, the Commission, for the most part, avoided selecting one community as the name.

The Commission welcomes full input from Albertans at the public hearings, following which it will prepare its final report in accordance with its constitutional and statutory mandate.

The Proposed Electoral Districts

The Commission proposes the following 34 electoral districts for Alberta:

Electoral District Name

Population

Deviation from
Electoral Quota
of 107,213

1

Banff—Airdrie

105,442

-1.65%

2

Battle River

105,680

-1.43%

3

Bow River

102,272

-4.61%

4

Calgary Centre

108,931

1.60%

5

Calgary Confederation

111,917

4.39%

6

Calgary Forest Lawn

108,413

1.12%

7

Calgary Heritage

108,320

1.03%

8

Calgary McCall

109,959

2.56%

9

Calgary Midnapore

111,227

3.74%

10

Calgary Nose Hill

109,264

1.91%

11

Calgary Shepard

110,364

2.94%

12

Calgary Signal Hill

109,647

2.27%

13

Calgary Spy Hill

108,791

1.47%

14

Edmonton Callingwood

102,598

-4.30%

15

Edmonton Griesbach

107,809

0.56%

16

Edmonton Manning

106,262

-0.89%

17

Edmonton McDougall

107,945

0.68%

18

Edmonton Mill Woods

106,103

-1.04%

19

Edmonton Riverbend

104,345

-2.68%

20

Edmonton Strathcona

105,140

-1.93%

21

Edmonton—Wetaskiwin

107,466

0.24%

22

Foothills

104,514

-2.52%

23

Fort McMurray—Athabasca

103,262

-3.69%

24

Grande Prairie

102,797

-4.12%

25

Lakeland

104,502

-2.53%

26

Lethbridge

105,999

-1.13%

27

Medicine Hat

109,235

1.89%

28

Peace River—Westlock

110,426

3.00%

29

Red Deer—Mountain View

108,465

1.17%

30

Red Deer—Wolf Creek

107,985

0.72%

31

Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan

111,541

4.04%

32

St. Albert—Edmonton

105,162

-1.91%

33

Sturgeon River

105,733

-1.38%

34

Yellowhead

107,741

0.49%

Detailed Descriptions

Part V of this proposal contains detailed descriptions and maps for each proposed electoral district.

General Comments on Regions

Northern Alberta

Alberta’s two northern electoral districts, Peace River and Fort McMurray—Athabasca, comprise approximately one-half of the land mass of Alberta, with only 7.3% of the population. Peace River’s population count has increased to 150,925 since the 2001 census. This represents a deviation of +40.8% from the electoral quota. Fort McMurray—Athabasca also grew from 88,882 in 2001 to 115,373 in 2011, resulting in a +7.6% deviation from the current electoral quota.

The 2002 commission suggested that the 2012 commission consider the possibility of creating a northern electoral district, running east–west across the province. The Commission finds that a northern electoral district is still not viable due to the continued absence of a northern east–west road transportation system across the province.

Considering the under-representation in the north, the Commission proposes to establish three northern electoral districts, namely: Grande Prairie, Peace River—Westlock and Fort McMurray—Athabasca. The proposed electoral district of Grande Prairie includes the City of Grande Prairie and surrounding area as described in Part V. The Commission views this as a cohesive district with common interests. The balance of the north will be divided in two north–south electoral districts.

The communities in the proposed electoral district of Peace River—Westlock, depicted in Part V, share agricultural, forestry, lumber and resource interests. Whitecourt, Barrhead and Westlock are all located on established transportation routes, serving as gateways to the north and as service providers. Not withstanding its large geographic size, the shared interests and alternate transportation routes make this electoral district viable. Technological advancement, including all forms of social media, continues to ease communication challenges formerly experienced in large geographic areas. In addition, allowances for large geographic size and a supplement for remoteness (where applicable) in Schedule 3 of the Canada Elections Act further facilitates representation by members of Parliament. Thus, although the geographic size is large, the electoral district can be effectively represented. Geographically large electoral districts are not uncommon in Canada.

The redrawn electoral district of Fort McMurray—Athabasca remains similar to the existing electoral district and the Commission proposes retention of the name. This district is appropriate in both size and character, with future population growth anticipated.

In summary, the Commission has determined that it is now reasonably practical to divide the north into three electoral districts as depicted and described in Part V.

City of Calgary

The population of Calgary has continued to increase over the past 10 years, growing from 878,866 in 2001 to 1,096,833 in 2011. Calgary’s practice of annexation prior to development has historically resulted in an ability to create electoral districts lying totally within existing city limits. To respect the community of urban interests, the Commission proposes to continue the practice of maintaining electoral districts within the municipal boundaries of large cities where population permits.

The Commission proposes that two new electoral districts be created within Calgary’s city limits — one in the south and one in the northwest. This increases Calgary’s electoral districts from 8 to 10. The Commission finds the average deviation for the 10 new electoral districts of 2.30% above the electoral quota to be acceptable.

South Calgary is currently represented by two electoral districts: Calgary Southwest and Calgary Southeast. The Commission proposes three southern electoral districts to be called: Calgary Heritage, Calgary Midnapore and Calgary Shepard. All three electoral districts will extend to the southern city limits to share in anticipated future population growth.

The creation of a new southern electoral district results in substantial change to the existing electoral district of Calgary East as Calgary East’s northern and southern boundaries move to the north. The Commission proposes that the electoral district to the north of Calgary Shepard be named Calgary Forest Lawn, and the electoral district directly north of Calgary Forest Lawn be called Calgary McCall. Calgary McCall extends to the north eastern city limits. (See Part V for details.)

The second new electoral district is to be created in northwest Calgary. The Commission proposes four electoral districts rather than the current three. The proposed new electoral districts will be Calgary Signal Hill, Calgary Confederation, Calgary Nose Hill and Calgary Spy Hill.

The existing Calgary Centre will extend further south and retain the name of Calgary Centre.

Edmonton Region

The census population count for the City of Edmonton grew from 666,104 in 2001 to 812,201 in 2011. Edmonton is surrounded by eight sizable communities: Beaumont, Devon, Fort Saskatchewan, Leduc, Sherwood Park, Spruce Grove, St. Albert and Stony Plain. A large portion of Edmonton’s workforce resides in these surrounding communities, with the furthest community situated approximately 10 kilometres from the city limits.

The 2002 electoral boundaries commission for Alberta viewed the Edmonton region as a whole and created eight electoral districts. Only three of those districts were situated entirely within the city limits, while five formed hybrid districts, reaching out from the city into its surrounding communities and beyond. This was done, in part, to preserve electoral district parity between Edmonton and Calgary. Some recommendations received by the commission noted the effectiveness of hybrid districts, where the smaller communities share infrastructure and other common interests with the larger city to which they are geographically attached. Not all agreed.

The Commission recognizes hybrid electoral districts as a viable means of combining an urban area with those areas beyond its municipal boundaries. Hybrid electoral districts are sometimes necessary, or desirable, to bring population numbers in line with the provincial quota to avoid over- or under-representation, or to deal with natural topographical divisions. In addition, some heavily populated areas outside an urban centre may share more in common with the urban area than the rural area beyond.

The hub and spoke, or pie, approach to drawing hybrid districts utilized by the last commission is one means of blending suburban, urban and rural communities in close proximity. Commonalities between communities may exist, depending on the reach of the spoke. The donut approach is another means of dealing with large populations outside municipal boundaries. Following this approach, an electoral district is comprised of small communities surrounding a city, on the theory that the communities inside the donut share more commonalities with each other than with the city they surround.

The Commission accepts that boundaries can be drawn in many ways, but each case must be determined having regard to its particular facts, the statutory criteria, the population count and the available alternatives for creating a workable electoral district that can be effectively represented.

Considering the growth within Edmonton’s municipal boundaries, the Commission proposes to create seven electoral districts within those boundaries. Considering population count and deviation from the electoral quota, as well as commonalities of interest, the Commission also proposes two hybrid electoral districts. The Commission viewed the North Saskatchewan River, which flows in a north easterly direction through the centre of the City of Edmonton, as a significant natural geographical boundary and proposes that one of the hybrid districts be in the northwest and one in the south. It also proposes an electoral district adjacent to Edmonton, named Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.

The seven electoral districts within the City of Edmonton are detailed in Part V of this proposal and will be named:

  1. Edmonton Manning
  2. Edmonton Callingwood
  3. Edmonton Griesbach
  4. Edmonton McDougall
  5. Edmonton Mill Woods
  6. Edmonton Riverbend
  7. Edmonton Strathcona

The current hybrid electoral district of Edmonton—St. Albert was found by the last commission to share common interests and concerns. The Commission agrees and is proposing that the hybrid electoral district continue as reconfigured and renamed. In view of St. Albert’s increased 2011 census population count of 61,466, the Commission proposes the name of St. Albert—Edmonton.

A second hybrid electoral district of Edmonton—Wetaskiwin is proposed. This district will extend south from Anthony Henday Drive (to the east of the Queen Elizabeth II Highway) and south from Ellerslie Road (to the west of the Queen Elizabeth II Highway), and will include many communities as detailed in Part V. The community furthest from the city is situated approximately 60 kilometres from the city limits. In previous redistributions, various combinations of Edmonton, Beaumont, Devon, Leduc and Wetaskiwin have been used within electoral districts. The proposed electoral district of Edmonton—Wetaskiwin includes much of the current Wetaskiwin electoral district, and the Commission is satisfied that the communities in the proposed district share many commonalities of interest.

The Commission also proposes the new electoral district of Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, located adjacent to Edmonton. This district includes Sherwood Park, Fort Saskatchewan and all of Strathcona County. The proximity of communities and commonality of interests in this area provide an excellent basis for an electoral district.

Finally, the Commission proposes the electoral district of Sturgeon River, to consist of several communities and areas around the north and western limits of Edmonton. This electoral district would encompass the City of Spruce Grove, Stony Plain, Redwater, Sturgeon County, Parkland County and a portion of Lac Ste. Anne County. This district has an added benefit of keeping together several communities which share a Francophone history, including Morinville, Legal, Gibbons, Villeneuve, Rivière Qui Barre and Bon Accord.

Remaining Rural Electoral Districts

Western Alberta

The Rocky Mountains form the southwest boundary of Alberta, and the Commission proposes to retain the traditional division between Banff National Park and Jasper National Park. The creation of the third northern electoral district means that the southern and northern boundaries of Yellowhead have moved south. The Commission proposes a redrawn electoral district of Yellowhead, to encompass much of the existing district of Yellowhead plus parts of the current electoral districts of Wild Rose, Wetaskiwin and Red Deer. This proposed electoral district maintains its historical character, with many rural interests such as farming, oil and gas, pulp and paper, forestry and tourism.

The population count of the existing Wild Rose electoral district has increased, with continuing and anticipated future growth in Airdrie, Cochrane, Canmore and surrounding communities. The Commission proposes to decrease the geographic size of this electoral district. The character of the proposed district in terms of geography, history and communities of interest and identity are appropriate, and the Commission proposes that the electoral district, as reconfigured, be named Banff—Airdrie.

Southern Alberta

The three electoral districts of Macleod, Lethbridge and Medicine Hat currently share Alberta’s southern boundary. Having regard to population increases in the south, particularly in Chestermere, Lethbridge, Okotoks and Strathmore, the Commission proposes the creation of a new electoral district in the southern region of the province. It proposes the following four electoral districts in southern Alberta:

  1. Lethbridge
  2. Foothills
  3. Bow River
  4. Medicine Hat

See Part V of this proposal for details.

Eastern Alberta

Two rural electoral districts are proposed along Alberta’s eastern border between the electoral districts of Medicine Hat and Fort McMurray—Athabasca, namely: Lakeland and Battle River. Although the boundaries and names have changed, both districts maintain their rural character and communities. The districts share many common interests and commerce. To avoid dividing communities of interest by following highways as boundaries, the Commission has endeavoured to follow county boundaries where reasonably possible. As a result, the east–west boundary dividing Lakeland and Battle River runs along the county boundaries between highways 14 and 16 for the most part (see Part V).

Central Alberta and Red Deer

Large population increases in Red Deer and the transportation corridor between Edmonton and Calgary have occurred over the past 10 years. Red Deer’s population count increased from 67,707 to 90,564. The Commission recommends that two electoral districts be created around the Queen Elizabeth II Highway between the southern border of the proposed district of Edmonton—Wetaskiwin and the northern border of the proposed district of Banff—Airdrie.

The Commission considered two viable alternatives for creating these electoral districts. First, it considered a new electoral district of Red Deer, with a second electoral district forming a donut around that Red Deer electoral district. Second, it considered dividing Red Deer and creating two hybrid districts. One hybrid would include north Red Deer and extend to the southern boundary of Edmonton—Wetaskiwin, and the second hybrid would contain south Red Deer and extend to the northern boundary of Banff—Airdrie.

The Commission considers both alternatives viable, but opts for the second. The interests of the City of Red Deer are inextricably intertwined with those of the surrounding communities in terms of trade, industry, recreation, health and others. Considering shape, proximity and shared interests, the Commission views the hybrid districts as preferable and proposes to divide Red Deer by an east–west line (primarily along the Red Deer River and Ross Street) to create two hybrid electoral districts as depicted in Part V of this proposal. The proposed names are:

  1. Red Deer—Wolf Creek
  2. Red Deer—Mountain View

The Commission thought it important that the Hobbema reserves of Samson, Ermineskin, Louis Bull and Montana be kept together, notwithstanding that they are currently in different counties. Accordingly, they are all contained in the electoral district of Red Deer—Wolf Creek.

Summary

The electoral district landscape of Alberta has changed to accommodate six new electoral districts as well as population shifts and changes since the 2001 census.

All existing electoral districts have changed — some significantly. Calgary and Edmonton have 52.37% of the 2011 census population count. Seventeen of the 34 proposed electoral districts are within the municipal boundaries of Calgary or Edmonton.

The Commission proposes one new electoral district in northern Alberta, two new electoral districts in and around the City of Edmonton, two new electoral districts within the City of Calgary and one new electoral district in southern Alberta.

The Commission is satisfied that all electoral districts can be effectively represented.

Part Ⅲ — Notice of Public Hearings

The Commission will hold public sittings at the following places, dates and times.

City/Town

Location

Date

Time

(1) Barrhead

Barrhead Neighbourhood Inn
6011 49 Street

Monday, 10 September 2012

1:30 p.m.

(2) Grande Prairie

Podollan Inn & Spa
10612 99th Avenue

Monday, 10 September 2012

7:30 p.m.

(3) Peace River

Sawridge Inn
9510 100th Street

Tuesday, 11 September 2012

12:30 p.m.

(4) Fort McMurray

Sawridge Inn
530 MacKenzie Boulevard

Tuesday, 11 September 2012

7:30 p.m.

(5) Vegreville

Vegreville Social Centre, Hall B 4802 47 Street

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

12:30 p.m.

(6) Edmonton

Westin
10135 100 Street Northwest

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

7:30 p.m.

(7) Edmonton

Westin
10135 100 Street Northwest

Thursday, 13 September 2012

9:00 a.m.

(8) Edmonton

Westin
10135 100 Street Northwest

Thursday, 13 September 2012

1:00 p.m.

(9) Camrose

Norsemen Inn
6505 48 Avenue

Friday, 14 September 2012

11:00 a.m.

(10) Lethbridge

Lethbridge Lodge
320 Scenic Drive South

Tuesday, 18 September 2012

12:00 p.m.

(11) Strathmore

Travelodge
350 Ridge Road

Tuesday, 18 September 2012

7:00 p.m.

(12) Red Deer

Sheraton (Capri)
3310 50 Avenue

Wednesday, 19 September 2012

1:30 p.m.

(13) Red Deer

Sheraton (Capri)
3310 50 Avenue

Wednesday, 19 September 2012

7:00 p.m.

(14) Calgary

Harry Hays Conference Centre 220 4 Avenue Southeast

Monday, 24 September 2012

1:30 p.m.

(15) Calgary

Harry Hays Conference Centre 220 4 Avenue Southeast

Monday, 24 September 2012

7:00 p.m.

(16) Calgary

Harry Hays Conference Centre 220 4 Avenue Southeast

Tuesday, 25 September 2012

1:30 p.m.

Interested persons proposing to make representations must read and follow the rules set out in Part ⅠV of this proposal. There is no entitlement to be heard by the Commission unless, pursuant to those rules, written notice is given stating the name and address of the person seeking to make the representation to the Commission and indicating concisely the nature of the representation, the interest of such person, the official language of his or her choice and accommodation needs such person may have. In order to allow the Commission time to arrange for accommodation and official language needs, notice of those needs must be included in the written notice to the Commission Secretary.

The notices must be received by Wednesday, August 10, 2012. Notices must be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to:

Ms. Ooldouz Sotoudehnia
Commission Secretary
Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Alberta
Harry Hays Building
220 4th Avenue Southeast, Suite 168
Calgary, AB
T2G 4X3
Fax: 1-855-747-7234
E-mail: alberta@rfed-rcf.ca

Notices may also be submitted electronically by completing the online form available at www.federal-redistribution.ca under Alberta > Public Hearings. Such notices must also be received by Wednesday, August 10, 2012.

Part ⅠV — Rules for Public Hearings

The Commission makes the following rules for its proposed public hearings. Rules for making representations are made under the authority of sections 18 and 19 of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. E-3, as amended.

These rules may be cited as “The Rules of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Alberta, 2012–2013” (hereinafter, “these Rules”).

The following rules will apply to public hearings:

 1. In these Rules:

  • a. “Act” means the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. E-3, as amended;
  • b. “advertisement” means the advertisement required by subsection 19(2) of the Act;
  • c. “Commission” means the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Alberta, established by proclamation on February 21, 2012;
  • d. “Commission Secretary” means the person designated as such by the Commission;
  • e. “notice” means a notice of intention to make a representation, submitted in writing to the Commission Secretary within the time limit established by subsection 19(5) of the Act;
  • f. “map” means the map published with the advertisement showing the proposed division of the province into electoral districts;
  • g. “representation” means a representation made in accordance with section 19 of the Act by an interested person as to the division of the province into electoral districts;
  • h. “sitting” means a sitting held for the hearing of representations in accordance with section 19 of the Act.

 2. A person giving notice shall name the proposed electoral district or electoral districts that are to be the subject of his or her representation.

 3. For the purpose of interpreting subsection 19(5) of the Act, notice shall be considered to have been given when it is mailed, and the postmark on the envelope containing the notice shall be accepted as proof of the date of its mailing.

 4. For the purpose of interpreting subsection 19(5) of the Act, notice shall be considered to have been given where mailed electronically and received by the Commission Secretary within the required time.

 5. Where a written representation is received by the Commission Secretary without notice of intent to appear at a sitting, the Commission Secretary shall forthwith invite the person sending the representation to appear at an appropriate sitting.

 6. If the sender of the written representation informs the Commission Secretary that he or she cannot appear at a sitting, the Commission Secretary shall ask the sender for consent to make the written representation public at an appropriate sitting.

 7. In accordance with subsection 19(5) of the Act, no representation shall be heard by the Commission at any sittings unless notice in writing is given to the Commission, stating the name and address of the person who seeks to make the representation, and indicating concisely the nature of the representation and the interest of the person, unless the Commission decides otherwise in accordance with subsection 19(6) of the Act.

 8. A person who seeks to make a representation shall state, in his or her written notice, at which of the advertised hearing locations such person wishes to appear to make the representation.

 9. Unless the sender of a written representation indicates otherwise in writing, a copy of the representation shall be made available at the sitting for examination by any person making a representation there.

10. Where the sender of a written representation indicates in writing that the representation may not be made public, the Commission shall not consider the written representation.

11. If no notice is received for a sitting, the Commission may cancel the sitting.

12. If a quorum of commissioners cannot be present at a sitting, the Commission may provide the hearing of representations by one member of the Commission pursuant to section 18 of the Act or may post pose the sitting to a later date.

13. In the event of a postponement or cancellation of a sitting, the Commission shall give public notice of such postponement or cancellation through local radio stations, and the Commission Secretary shall notify any person who has given notice and has not been heard.

14. Only one person shall be heard in the presentation of any single representation, including a representation on behalf of an association or group, unless the Commission in its discretion decides otherwise.

15. A person giving notice to make a representation shall indicate the official language in which it is to be made and accommodation needs they may have.

16. A time limit of 15 minutes per representation will be the general rule.

17. The time limitation of 15 minutes includes the set-up and take-down of all audiovisual equipment, and any equipment required is the responsibility of the person making the representation.

18. If it appears at a sitting that the Commission cannot complete the hearing of representations within the allotted time, the Commission may adjourn the sitting to a later date at the same or another location, having regard to the convenience of those whose representations have not yet been heard.

Hearing Cancellation or Notice of Postponement

If a hearing cannot be held due to bad weather or other circumstances, notice of the postponement or cancellation will be given through local radio stations. Details concerning any new hearing will be published in an appropriate local newspaper, and the Commission Secretary will advise persons who have given notice of intention to appear.

Dated at Calgary, Alberta, this 18th day of June, 2012.

THE HONOURABLE MADAM JUSTICE CAROLE CONRAD
Chair
Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission
for the Province of Alberta

Part V — Maps, Proposed Boundaries and Names of Electoral Districts

There shall be in the Province of Alberta thirty-four (34) electoral districts named and described as follows, each of which shall return one member.

In the following descriptions:

  • (a) reference to “road”, “street”, “avenue”, “drive”, “highway”, “trail”, “boulevard”, “river” or “railway” signifies their centre line unless otherwise described;

  • (b) townships, ranges and meridians are in accordance with the Dominion Lands system of survey and include the extension thereof in accordance with that system. They are abbreviated as “Tp”, “R” and “W 4” or “W 5”;

  • (c) the bank of a river is referred to as the right or left bank, according to whether it is to the right or left respectively when facing downstream. If no bank is mentioned, the centre thread shall be used;

  • (d) all villages, summer villages, towns, cities, district municipalities, Indian reserves and national parks of Canada lying within the perimeter of the electoral district are included unless otherwise described;

  • (e) reference to “county”, “municipal district”, “special area” and “national park of Canada” for inclusion in an electoral district signifies that all villages, summer villages, towns, cities, Indian reserves and other areas within the county, municipal district, special area and national park of Canada are included unless otherwise described;

  • (f) wherever a word or expression is used to denote a territorial division, such word or expression shall indicate the territorial division as it existed or was bounded on the first day of January, 2011, unless otherwise specified;

  • (g) the translation of the terms “street”, “avenue” and “boulevard” follows Treasury Board standards, while the translation of all other public thoroughfare designations is based on commonly used terms but has no official recognition; and

  • (h) all coordinates are in reference to the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83).

The population figure of each electoral district is derived from the 2011 decennial census.

Banff—Airdrie

(Population: 105,442)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Rocky View County with Highway No. 791; thence southerly along said highway to Highway No. 567; thence easterly along said highway to Highway No. 791; thence generally southerly along said highway to Highway No. 564; thence westerly along said highway to the easterly limit of the City of Calgary; thence generally northwesterly, westerly and generally southwesterly along the easterly, northerly and westerly limits of said city to Highway No. 1; thence generally westerly and northwesterly along said highway to the easterly limit of the Municipal District of Bighorn No. 8; thence southerly, westerly and northerly along the easterly, southerly and westerly limits of said municipal district to the southeasterly corner of Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143, 144; thence generally westerly along the southerly boundary of said Indian reserve to the west boundary of R 7 W 5; thence south along the west boundary of R 7 W 5 to the south boundary of Tp 24; thence west along the south boundary of Tp 24 to the southerly limit of the Town of Canmore; thence westerly, southerly, westerly, northerly and westerly along said limit to the south boundary of Tp 24; thence west along the south boundary of Tp 24 to the easterly boundary of Banff National Park of Canada; thence generally southerly along said boundary to the west boundary of said province; thence generally northwesterly along said boundary to the northerly boundary of Banff National Park of Canada; thence generally northeasterly and southeasterly along said boundary to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Bighorn No. 8; thence generally easterly, generally northeasterly and generally southerly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Rocky View County; thence generally easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Battle River

(Population: 105,680)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the east boundary of said province with the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Wainwright No. 61; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the easterly limit of Beaver County; thence generally northwesterly, generally southeasterly and generally westerly along the easterly, northerly and westerly limits of said county to the easterly limit of Leduc County; thence northerly and westerly along the easterly and northerly limits of said county to Highway No. 21; thence southerly and generally southeasterly along said highway to the northerly limit of Camrose County; thence westerly and generally southerly along the northerly and westerly limits of said county to the westerly limit of Stettler County No. 6; thence generally southerly along said limit to the northerly limit of Red Deer County; thence generally southwesterly along said limit to the northerly production of Range Road 240; thence generally southerly along said production and Range Road 240 to Township Road 360A; thence southeasterly along said road to Range Road 235A; thence southwesterly along said road to Range Road 240A; thence generally southerly along said road and Range Road 240 to the northerly limit of Kneehill County; thence generally westerly and generally southerly along northerly and westerly limits of said county to Township Road 314; thence easterly along said road to Highway No. 806; thence southerly along said highway to Highway No. 582; thence generally easterly along said highway and Highway No. 27 to the left bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally southerly along said bank to the westerly limit of the Town of Drumheller; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the westerly limit of Special Area No. 2; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to Highway No. 848; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 570; thence generally easterly along said highway to Highway No. 876; thence generally southerly along said highway to Highway No. 570; thence easterly along said highway to the easterly limit of Special Area No. 2; thence generally northerly along said limit to the southerly limit of Special Area No. 4; thence easterly along said limit to the east boundary of the Province of Alberta; thence north along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Bow River

(Population: 102,272)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of Kneehill County with Township Road 314; thence easterly along said road to Highway No. 806; thence southerly along said highway to Highway No. 582; thence easterly along said highway and Highway No. 27 to the left bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally southerly along said bank to the westerly limit of the Town of Drumheller; thence generally southeasterly along said limit and the easterly limit of Wheatland County to Highway No. 848; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 570; thence generally easterly along said highway to Highway No. 876; thence generally southerly along said highway to Highway No. 570; thence easterly along said highway to the easterly limit of Special Area No. 2; thence southerly along said limit to the right bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally southwesterly along said bank to the easterly limit of Newell County No. 4; thence southerly and generally westerly along the easterly and southerly limits of said county to the southeasterly limit of Vulcan County; thence generally southwesterly along the southerly limit of said county to the easterly limit of the Municipal District of Willow Creek No. 26; thence generally southerly, generally southwesterly, generally northerly and generally easterly along the easterly, southerly westerly and northerly limits of said municipal district to the westerly limit of Vulcan County; thence generally northerly along said limit to the southerly limit of Wheatland County; thence generally westerly along said limit and the southerly limit of Rocky View County to the easterly limit of the City of Calgary; thence generally northerly along said limit to Highway No. 564; thence easterly along said highway to Highway No. 791; thence generally northerly along said highway to Highway No. 567; thence westerly along said highway to Highway No. 791; thence northerly along said highway to the northerly limit of Rocky View County; thence generally easterly along said limit to the southwesterly limit of Kneehill County; thence generally northerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Calgary Centre

(Population: 108,931)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of 37 Street SW with Glenmore Trail SW (Highway No. 8); thence northerly along 37 Street SW to Bow Trail SW; thence generally easterly along said trail to Crowchild Trail SW; thence northerly along said trail to the right bank of the Bow River; thence generally easterly (passing to the north of Prince’s Island) and generally southerly along said bank to Glenmore Trail SE; thence northwesterly and generally westerly along said trail and along Glenmore Trail SW (Highway No. 8) to the point of commencement.

Calgary Confederation

(Population: 111,917)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Nose Hill Drive NW with Crowchild Trail NW (Highway No. 1A); thence southeasterly along Crowchild Trail NW (Highway No. 1A) to Shaganappi Trail NW; thence northeasterly along said trail to John Laurie Boulevard NW; thence southeasterly and northeasterly along said boulevard to McKnight Boulevard NW; thence generally easterly along said boulevard and along McKnight Boulevard NE to Deerfoot Trail NE (Highway No. 2); thence southerly along said trail to Memorial Drive NE; thence westerly along said drive to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southerly along said railway to the right bank of the Bow River; thence generally westerly along said bank (passing to the north of Prince’s Island) to Crowchild Trail SW; thence northerly along said trail to the left bank of the Bow River; thence generally northwesterly along said bank to Stoney Trail NW (Highway No. 201); thence northeasterly along said trail to Nose Hill Drive NW; thence generally easterly and generally northeasterly along said drive to the point of commencement.

Calgary Forest Lawn

(Population: 108,413)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with 17 Avenue SE; thence westerly along said avenue to the Canadian National Railway; thence southwesterly along said railway to the southeasterly production of 48 Street SE; thence northwesterly along said production and 48 Street SE to the easterly production of 26 Avenue SE; thence westerly along said production, 26 Avenue SE and its westerly production to the right bank of the Bow River; thence generally northerly along said bank to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence northerly along said railway to Memorial Drive NE; thence easterly along said drive to Deerfoot Trail NE (Highway No. 2); thence northerly along said trail to McKnight Boulevard NE; thence generally easterly along said boulevard to 52 Street NE; thence southerly along said street to 32 Avenue NE; thence easterly along said avenue and its easterly production to the easterly limit of said city; thence southerly, easterly and southerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Calgary Heritage

(Population: 108,320)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary lying westerly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with 14 Street SW; thence northerly along said street and northerly and easterly along James McKevitt Road SW to Macleod Trail S; thence northerly along said trail to Glenmore Trail SW (Highway No. 8); thence westerly and generally northwesterly along said trail to 37 Street SW; thence southerly along said street to the westerly limit of said city.

Calgary McCall

(Population: 109,959)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary lying northerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with the easterly production of 32 Avenue NE; thence westerly along said production and 32 Avenue NE to 52 Street NE; thence northerly along said street to McKnight Boulevard NE; thence generally westerly along said boulevard to Deerfoot Trail NE (Highway No. 2); thence northerly along said trail to Beddington Trail NE; thence northwesterly along said trail to Harvest Hills Boulevard N; thence generally northerly along said boulevard and Centre Street N to the northerly limit of said city.

Calgary Midnapore

(Population: 111,227)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Macleod Trail S with Glenmore Trail SE (Highway No. 8); thence generally easterly along Glenmore Trail SE (Highway No. 8) to the left bank of the Bow River; thence generally southerly along said bank, including all islands adjacent to the river bank, to the southerly limit of said city; thence southerly, westerly and generally northwesterly along the southerly and westerly limits of said city to 14 Street SW; thence generally northerly along said street and northerly and easterly along James McKevitt Road SW to Macleod Trail S; thence generally northerly along said trail to the point of commencement.

Calgary Nose Hill

(Population: 109,264)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Sarcee Trail NW with Stoney Trail NW (Highway No. 201); thence generally northeasterly along Stoney Trail NW (Highway No. 201) to Harvest Hills Boulevard N; thence generally southerly along said boulevard to Beddington Trail NE; thence southeasterly along said trail to Deerfoot Trail NE (Highway No. 2); thence southerly along said trail to McKnight Boulevard NE; thence generally westerly along said boulevard and McKnight Boulevard NW to John Laurie Boulevard NW; thence southwesterly and northwesterly along said boulevard to Sarcee Trail NW; thence generally northerly along said trail to the point of commencement.

Calgary Shepard

(Population: 110,364)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Canadian National Railway with 17 Avenue SE; thence easterly along said avenue to the easterly limit of said city; thence generally southerly and westerly along the easterly and southerly limits of said city to Deerfoot Trail SE (Highway No. 2); thence generally northerly along the left bank of the Bow River to Glenmore Trail SE (Highway No. 8); thence northwesterly along said trail to the right bank of the Bow River; thence generally northerly along said bank to the westerly production of 26 Avenue SE; thence easterly along said production, 26 Avenue SE and its easterly production to 48 Street SE; thence southeasterly along said street and its southeasterly production to the Canadian National Railway; thence northeasterly along said railway to the point of commencement.

Calgary Signal Hill

(Population: 109,647)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with the left bank of the Bow River; thence generally southeasterly along said bank to Crowchild Trail SW; thence southerly along said trail to Bow Trail SW; thence generally westerly along said trail to 37 Street SW; thence southerly along said street to the southerly limit of said city at the northeasternmost corner of Tsuu T’ina Nation Indian Reserve No. 145.

Calgary Spy Hill

(Population: 108,791)

(Map 2)

Consisting of that part of the City of Calgary lying westerly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Centre Street N; thence southerly along Centre Street N to Stoney Trail NW (Highway No. 201); thence generally southwesterly along said trail to Sarcee Trail NW; thence generally southerly along said trail to John Laurie Boulevard NW; thence generally southeasterly along said boulevard to Shaganappi Trail NW; thence southwesterly along said trail to Crowchild Trail NW (Highway No. 1A); thence northwesterly along said trail to Nose Hill Drive NW; thence generally southwesterly along said drive to Stoney Trail NW (Highway No. 201); thence southerly along said trail to the left bank of the Bow River; thence generally westerly along said bank to the westerly limit of said city.

Edmonton Callingwood

(Population: 102,598)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16); thence easterly along said trail to the Canadian National Railway (south of Kinokamau Lake); thence northeasterly along said railway to 170 Street NW; thence southerly along said street to Stony Plain Road NW; thence easterly along said road to 156 Street NW; thence southerly along said street to Meadowlark Road NW; thence southerly along said road to 156 Street NW; thence southerly along said street to Whitemud Drive NW (Highway No. 2); thence easterly and southerly along said drive to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally southwesterly along said bank to the southerly limit of said city.

Edmonton Griesbach

(Population: 107,809)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16) with the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence northeasterly along said bank to the Canadian National Railway; thence northwesterly and westerly along said railway to 66 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to 153 Avenue NW; thence westerly along said avenue to Castle Downs Road NW; thence southerly along said road to 137 Avenue NW; thence westerly along said avenue to St. Albert Trail NW (Highway No. 2); thence southeasterly along said trail to the Canadian National Railway; thence easterly and southerly along said railway to Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16, west of 121 Street NW); thence easterly along said trail to 97 Street NW (Highway No. 28); thence southerly along said street and its southerly production to Grierson Hill Road NW; thence northeasterly and easterly along said road and 101 Avenue NW to 95 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to Rowland Road NW; thence easterly and northeasterly along said road to 92 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to its endpoint; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the intersection of 89 Street NW with 103A Avenue NW; thence northeasterly along said avenue to 87 Street NW; thence easterly and southerly along said street to Rowland Road NW; thence easterly along said road to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to the point of commencement.

Edmonton Manning

(Population: 106,262)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton lying northerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence northeasterly along said bank to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to 66 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to 153 Avenue NW; thence westerly along said avenue to Castle Downs Road NW; thence generally northerly and generally easterly along said road to 97 Street NW (Highway No. 28); thence northerly along said street to the northerly limit of said city.

Edmonton McDougall

(Population: 107,945)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16) with 97 Street NW (Highway No. 28); thence southerly along said street and its southerly production to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally southwesterly along said bank to Whitemud Drive NW (Highway No. 2); thence northerly and westerly along said drive to 156 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to Meadowlark Road NW; thence northerly along said road to 156 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to Stony Plain Road NW; thence westerly along said road to 170 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to the Canadian National Railway; thence generally easterly along said railway to Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16, west of 121 Street NW); thence easterly along said trail to the point of commencement.

Edmonton Mill Woods

(Population: 106,103)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with Whitemud Drive NW (Highway No. 14); thence generally westerly along said drive to Calgary Trail NW (Highway No. 2); thence southerly along said trail to Anthony Henday Drive NW (Highway No. 216); thence easterly and northeasterly along said drive to the easterly limit of said city; thence generally northerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Edmonton Riverbend

(Population: 104,345)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Whitemud Drive NW (Highway No. 2) with the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence southerly and easterly along said drive to Calgary Trail NW (Highway No. 2); thence southerly along said trail to Ellerslie Road SW (9 Avenue SW); thence westerly along said road and its westerly production to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to the point of commencement.

Edmonton Strathcona

(Population: 105,140)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the City of Edmonton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with Whitemud Drive NW (Highway No. 14); thence westerly and northerly along said drive to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to the southerly production of 97 Street NW; thence northerly along said production to Grierson Hill Road NW; thence northeasterly and easterly along said road and 101 Avenue NW to 95 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to Rowland Road NW; thence easterly and northeasterly along said road to 92 Street NW; thence northerly along said street to its endpoint; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the intersection of 89 Street NW with 103A Avenue NW; thence northeasterly along said avenue to 87 Street NW; thence easterly and southerly along said street to Rowland Road NW; thence easterly along said road to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to the easterly limit of said city; thence generally southerly, generally easterly and southerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Edmonton—Wetaskiwin

(Population: 107,466)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Edmonton lying easterly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence northerly along said bank to the westerly production of Ellerslie Road SW (9 Avenue SW); thence easterly along said production and Ellerslie Road SW (9 Avenue SW) to Calgary Trail NW (Highway No. 2); thence northerly along said trail to Anthony Henday Drive NW (Highway No. 216); thence easterly and northeasterly along said drive to the easterly limit of said city;

  • (b) that part of Leduc County described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of Leduc County with Range Road 22; thence northerly along said road to Township Road 474; thence easterly along said road to Highway No. 771; thence northerly along said highway to Highway No. 616; thence easterly along said highway to Range Road 20; thence northerly along said road to Township Road 482; thence easterly along said road to Range Road 10; thence northerly along said road and its intermittent productions to the northerly limit of Leduc County on the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to the southerly limit of the City of Edmonton; thence easterly along said limit to the westerly limit of Strathcona County; thence southerly and easterly along the westerly and southerly limits of said county to Highway No. 21; thence southerly and generally southeasterly along said highway to the northerly limit of Camrose County; thence westerly and generally southerly along the northerly and westerly limits of said county to the southerly limit of Leduc County; thence generally westerly and generally southwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement;

  • (c) that part of Wetaskiwin County No. 10 lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of Leduc County with Range Road 22; thence southerly along said road to Township Road 470; thence easterly along said road to Highway No. 771; thence generally southeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 13; thence easterly along said highway to Range Road 10; thence southerly along said road to Township Road 454; thence easterly along said road to Range Road 280; thence southerly along said road and Highway No. 792 to the southerly limit of Wetaskiwin County No. 10; and

  • (d) the summer villages of Poplar Bay, Grandview, Crystal Springs, Norris Beach, Ma-Me-O Beach, Silver Beach, Argentia Beach, Golden Days, Itaska Beach and Sundance Beach, Pigeon Lake Indian Reserve No. 138A, the cities of Leduc and Wetaskiwin and the towns of Beaumont, Devon, Millet and Calmar.

Foothills

(Population: 104,514)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the west boundary of said province with the southerly boundary of Banff National Park of Canada; thence generally northerly along the easterly boundary of said national park to the north boundary of Tp 23; thence east along the north boundary of Tp 23 to the southerly limit of the Town of Canmore; thence easterly, southerly, easterly, northerly and easterly along said limit to the north boundary of Tp 23; thence east along the north boundary of Tp 23 to the east boundary of R 8 W 5; thence north along the east boundary of R 8 W 5 to the southerly boundary of Stoney Indian Reserve No. 142, 143, 144; thence generally easterly along said boundary to the westerly limit of the Municipal District of Bighorn No. 8; thence southerly, easterly and northerly along the westerly, southerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to Highway No. 1; thence generally easterly along said highway to the westerly limit of the City of Calgary; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the southeasterly corner of said city (northerly limit of the Municipal District of Foothills No. 31); thence generally easterly, generally southerly, generally westerly and southerly along the northerly, easterly and southerly limits of the Municipal District of Foothills No. 31 to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Ranchland No. 66; thence easterly and generally southerly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to the northeasterly corner of the Municipal District of Pincher Creek No. 9; thence southerly and easterly along the easterly and northerly limits of said municipal district to the northerly boundary of Piikani Indian Reserve No. 147; thence easterly, southerly and westerly along the northerly, easterly and southerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the easterly limit of the Municipal District of Pincher Creek No. 9; thence southerly along said limit to the westerly limit of Cardston County; thence northeasterly along said limit to the westerly boundary of Blood Indian Reserve No. 148; thence northeasterly along said boundary to the westerly limit of the County of Lethbridge; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the southwesterly limit of the City of Lethbridge; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the westerly limit of the County of Lethbridge; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the easterly limit of Cardston County; thence generally southerly, easterly and southerly along said limit to the southerly boundary of said province; thence westerly and generally northerly along the southerly and westerly boundaries of said province to the point of commencement.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca

(Population: 103,262)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta lying northerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the east boundary of said province with the southerly limit of Lac La Biche County; thence generally westerly and generally southwesterly along said limit to the easterly limit of Smoky Lake County; thence generally southeasterly and generally southwesterly along said limit to the northerly limit of Two Hills County No. 21; thence generally northwesterly and generally westerly along said limit to the easterly limit of Thorhild County No. 7; thence generally southerly, westerly and generally northerly along the easterly, southerly and westerly limits of said county to the southerly limit of Athabasca County; thence generally westerly and generally northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said county to the southerly limit of the Municipal District of Opportunity No. 17; thence westerly, generally northerly, westerly, northerly, westerly and northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said municipal district to the north boundary of Tp 82; thence west along the north boundary of Tp 82 to the west boundary of R 13 W 5; thence north along the west boundary of R 13 W 5 to the southerly boundary of Woodland Cree Indian Reserve No. 228; thence generally northerly along the southerly, easterly and northerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the west boundary of R 13 W 5 (on the most northerly boundary of said Indian reserve); thence north along the west boundary of R 13 W 5 to the north boundary of Tp 88; thence east along the north boundary of Tp 88 to the westerly limit of the Municipal District of Opportunity No. 17; thence northerly, easterly, northerly and easterly along the westerly and northerly limits of said municipal district to the westerly limit of the Specialized Municipality of Wood Buffalo; thence northerly along said limit and along the westerly boundary of Wood Buffalo National Park of Canada to the left bank of the Peace River; thence generally northeasterly along said bank to a point at latitude 58°41′21″N and longitude 113°55′32″W; thence easterly in a straight line to a point on the right bank of the Peace River at latitude 58°41′21″N and longitude 113°43′36″W; thence generally northerly along said bank to a point at latitude 58°42′00″N and longitude 113°43′25″W; thence northerly in a straight line to a point on an unnamed trail at latitude 58°45′55″N and longitude 113°43′25″W; thence westerly in a straight line to a point on the westerly boundary of Wood Buffalo National Park of Canada at latitude 58°45′55″N and longitude 114°00′00″W; thence northerly, westerly and northerly along said boundary to the north boundary of the Province of Alberta.

Grande Prairie

(Population: 102,797)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the west boundary of said province with the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Clear Hills County; thence easterly and generally southerly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Peace No. 135; thence easterly along said limit to the east boundary of R 23 W 5; thence south along the east boundary of R 23 W 5 to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Birch Hills County; thence northeasterly and generally southwesterly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to the easterly limit of the Municipal District of Grande Prairie County No. 1; thence generally southerly along said limit to Highway No. 43; thence generally easterly along said highway to the Sixth Meridian; thence south along said meridian to the south boundary of Tp 65; thence west along the south boundary of Tp 65 to the west boundary of the Province of Alberta; thence north along the west boundary of said province to the point of commencement.

Lakeland

(Population: 104,502)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the east boundary of said province with the southerly limit of Vermilion River County; thence generally northwesterly and westerly along said limit, continuing along the southerly limit of Minburn County No. 27 and along the southerly limit of Lamont County to the easterly boundary of Elk Island National Park of Canada; thence southerly, generally westerly and generally northerly along the easterly, southerly and westerly boundaries of said national park to the westerly limit of Lamont County; thence westerly and generally northerly along said limit to the southwesterly corner of the Town of Bruderheim; thence northerly along the westerly limit of said town and the westerly limit of Lamont County to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally northeasterly, generally easterly and generally southeasterly along said bank to the westerly boundary of Saddle Lake Indian Reserve No. 125; thence northerly, easterly, generally northerly and generally easterly along the westerly and northerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the westerly limit of St. Paul County No. 19; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the southerly boundary of White Fish Lake Indian Reserve No. 128; thence generally northwesterly and generally southeasterly along the westerly and northerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the westerly limit of St. Paul County No. 19; thence northerly, easterly and generally northeasterly along the westerly and northerly limits of said county to the westerly limit of the Municipal District of Bonnyville No. 87; thence northerly, generally northeasterly and generally easterly along the westerly and northerly limits of said municipal district to the east boundary of the Province of Alberta; thence south along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Lethbridge

(Population: 105,999)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Lethbridge; and

  • (b) Lethbridge County.

Medicine Hat

(Population: 109,235)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta lying southerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the east boundary of said province with the northerly limit of Special Area No. 3; thence westerly and generally southerly along the northerly and westerly limits of said special area to the right bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally southwesterly along said bank to the southwesterly limit of Special Area No. 2; thence generally southerly along said limit to the northwesterly limit of Cypress County; thence southerly and westerly along the westerly limit of said county to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Taber; thence generally northwesterly, generally southwesterly and generally southeasterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly limits of said municipal district to the northerly limit of Warner County No. 5; thence generally westerly and generally southerly along the northerly and westerly limits of said county to the south boundary of said province.

Peace River—Westlock

(Population: 110,426)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the north boundary of said province with the easterly limit of Mackenzie County; thence southerly, easterly and southerly along said limit to a point at latitude 58°45′55″N and longitude 114°00′00″W; thence easterly in a straight line to a point on an unnamed trail at latitude 58°45′55″N and longitude 113°43′25″W; thence southerly in a straight line to a point on the right bank of the Peace River at latitude 58°42′00″N and longitude 113°43′25″W; thence generally southerly along said bank to a point at latitude 58°41′21″N and longitude 113°43′36″W; thence westerly in a straight line to a point on the left bank of the Peace River at latitude 58°41′21″N and longitude 113°55′32″W; thence southwesterly along said bank to the easterly limit of Mackenzie County; thence southerly and westerly along easterly and southerly limits of said county to the easterly limit of Northern Sunrise County; thence southerly, westerly and southerly along said limit to the south boundary of Tp 89; thence west along the south boundary of Tp 89 to the east boundary of R 14 W 5; thence south along the east boundary of R 14 W 5 to the northerly boundary of Woodland Cree Indian Reserve No. 228; thence generally southerly along the northerly, easterly and southerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the east boundary of R 14 W 5 (on the most southerly boundary of said Indian reserve); thence south along the east boundary of R 14 W 5 to the south boundary of Tp 83; thence east along the south boundary of Tp 83 to the easterly limit of Northern Sunrise County; thence southerly along said limit to the northerly limit of the Municipal District of Lesser Slave River No. 124; thence easterly, southerly, easterly and generally southerly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipal district to the easterly limit of Westlock County; thence generally southerly, easterly, generally southerly and generally southwesterly along the easterly and southerly limits of said county to the easterly limit of Barrhead County No. 11; thence southerly and generally northwesterly along easterly and southerly limits of said county to the easterly limit of Woodlands County; thence generally southerly, generally westerly and generally northwesterly along easterly and southerly limits of said county to the southerly limit of the Municipal District of Greenview No. 16; thence generally southwesterly along said limit to the west boundary of R 23 W 5; thence north along the west boundary of R 23 W 5 to the north boundary of Tp 64; thence west along the north boundary of Tp 64 to the Sixth Meridian; thence north along said meridian to Highway No. 43; thence generally westerly along said highway to the easterly limit of Grande Prairie County No. 1; thence generally northerly along said limit to the southerly limit of Birch Hills County; thence generally easterly, generally northeasterly and generally southwesterly along the easterly and northerly limits of said county to the west boundary of R 22 W 5; thence north along the west boundary of R 22 W 5 to the southerly limit of Northern Lights County; thence westerly, generally northerly and westerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said county to the west boundary of said province; thence north and east along the west and north boundaries of said province to the point of commencement.

Red Deer—Mountain View

(Population: 108,465)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) Mountain View County; and

  • (b) that part of Red Deer County lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said county with Highway No. 11 (David Thompson Highway); thence generally easterly along said highway and Township Road 384 to the westerly limit of the City of Red Deer; thence southerly along said limit to the right bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally easterly along said bank to Taylor Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive and Ross (50) Street to 20 Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to Highway No. 11 (David Thompson Highway); thence easterly along said highway to the northerly limit of Red Deer County; thence easterly along said limit to the northerly production of Range Road 240; thence generally southerly along said production and Range Road 240 to Township Road 360A; thence southeasterly along said road to Range Road 235A; thence southwesterly along said road to Range Road 240A; thence generally southerly along said road and Range Road 240 to the southerly limit of said county.

Red Deer—Wolf Creek

(Population: 107,985)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) Lacombe County;

  • (b) that part of Red Deer County lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said county with Highway No. 11 (David Thompson Highway); thence generally easterly along said highway and Township Road 384 to the westerly limit of the City of Red Deer; thence southerly along said limit to the right bank of the Red Deer River; thence generally easterly along said bank to Taylor Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive and Ross (50) Street to 20 Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to Highway No. 11 (David Thompson Highway); thence easterly along said highway to the northerly limit of said county;

  • (c) that part of Ponoka County lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southern limit of said county and Range Road 14; thence northerly along said road to Township Road 422; thence easterly along said road to Highway No. 771; thence northerly along said highway to Highway No. 53; thence easterly along said highway to Highway No. 792; thence northerly along said highway to the northerly limit of Ponoka County; and

  • (d) Louis Bull Indian Reserve No. 138B, Ermineskin Indian Reserve No. 138, Samson Indian Reserve No. 137, Samson Indian Reserve No. 137A, Montana Indian Reserve No. 139, the Summer Village of Parkland Beach and the Town of Ponoka.

Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan

(Population: 111,541)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Fort Saskatchewan; and

  • (b) the County of Strathcona.

St. Albert—Edmonton

(Population: 105,162)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of St. Albert; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Edmonton lying westerly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with 97 Street NW (Highway No. 28); thence southerly along said street to Castle Downs Road NW; thence generally westerly and generally southerly along said road to 137 Avenue NW; thence westerly along said avenue to St. Albert Trail NW (Highway No. 2); thence southeasterly along said trail to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly and southwesterly along said railway to Yellowhead Trail NW (Highway No. 16); thence westerly along said trail to the westerly limit of the City of Edmonton.

Sturgeon River

(Population: 105,733)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the northeasterly corner of Sturgeon County; thence generally southwesterly and generally westerly along the easterly and southerly limits of said county to the northerly limit of Parkland County; thence southerly along the easterly limit of said county to the northerly boundary of Stony Plain Indian Reserve No. 135; thence easterly and southerly along the northerly and easterly boundaries of said Indian reserve to the easterly limit of Parkland County; thence southerly and easterly along said limit to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally southwesterly along said bank to the southerly production of Range Road 20; thence northerly along said production, Range Road 20 and its northerly production to Township Road 510; thence westerly along said road to Range Road 20; thence northerly along said road and Range Road 20-Lake Eden Road to the southerly limit of Lac Ste. Anne County; thence westerly along said limit to Highway No. 43; thence northerly and generally northwesterly along said highway to the easterly boundary of Alexis Indian Reserve No. 133; thence northerly and westerly along the easterly and northerly boundaries of said Indian reserve to Highway No. 43; thence generally northwesterly along said highway to Highway No. 764; thence northerly along said highway to the northerly limit of Lac Ste. Anne County; thence generally northeasterly and southeasterly along said limit to the westerly limit of Sturgeon County; thence generally northeasterly and easterly along the westerly and northerly limits of said county to the point of commencement.

Yellowhead

(Population: 107,741)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Province of Alberta described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the west boundary of said province with the north boundary of Tp 64; thence east along the north boundary of Tp 64 to the east boundary of R 24 W 5; thence south along the east boundary of R 24 W 5 to the northerly limit of Yellowhead County; thence generally easterly along said limit to the westerly limit of Lac Ste. Anne County; thence generally northerly, generally easterly and generally southerly along the westerly and northerly limits of said county to Highway No. 764; thence southerly along said highway to Highway No. 43; thence generally southeasterly along said highway to the northerly boundary of Alexis Indian Reserve No. 133; thence easterly and southerly along the northerly and easterly boundaries of said Indian reserve to Highway No. 43; thence generally southeasterly and southerly along said highway to the northerly limit of Parkland County; thence easterly along said limit to Range Road 20-Lake Eden Road; thence southerly along said road and Range Road 20 to Township Road 510; thence easterly along said road to the northerly production of Range Road 20; thence southerly along said production, Range Road 20 and its southerly production to the right bank of the North Saskatchewan River; thence generally southeasterly along said bank to the northerly production of Range Road 10; thence southerly along said production, Range Road 10 and its intermittent productions to Township Road 482; thence generally westerly along said road to Range Road 20; thence southerly along said road to Highway No. 616; thence westerly along said highway to Highway No. 771; thence southerly along said highway to Township Road 474; thence westerly along said road to Range Road 22; thence southerly along said road to Township Road 470; thence generally southeasterly along said road and Highway No. 771 to Highway No. 13; thence easterly along said highway to Range Road 10; thence southerly along said road to Township Road 454; thence easterly along said road to Range Road 280; thence southerly along said road and Highway No. 792 to Highway No. 53; thence westerly along said highway to Highway No. 771; thence southerly along said highway to Township Road 422; thence westerly along said road to Range Road 14; thence southerly along said road to the southerly limit of Ponoka County; thence generally westerly along said limit to the easterly limit of Clearwater County; thence generally southerly, generally westerly, generally southerly, westerly and generally northwesterly along the easterly, southerly and westerly limits of said county to the southerly boundary of Jasper National Park of Canada; thence generally northwesterly and generally southwesterly along said boundary to the west boundary of the Province of Alberta; thence generally northwesterly and northerly along said boundary to the point of commencement.