ARCHIVED — Supplement — August 4, 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEDERAL ELECTORAL BOUNDARIES COMMISSION
FOR THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC

PROPOSAL

Part Ⅰ — Introduction

The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Quebec (the Commission) was established by proclamation, dated February 21, 2012, and published on March 14, 2012, in accordance with the provisions of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, Chapter E-3 (the Act). The Commission consists of:

Chair: Hon. Jules Allard, S.J.C.
Member: Dr. Raymond Hudon, Ph.D.
Member: Mr. J. Michel Doyon, Q.C., Ad.E., Ph.D.

Voting is the defining action by which citizens express their views within a democratic system. In light of apparent lack of interest, shown particularly in declining voter turnout in elections, it is especially important to ensure that the wishes of citizens who vote are properly reflected. The way a territory is divided into electoral districts must be based on respect for citizens’ preferences; for this reason, electoral boundaries are readjusted every 10 years according to the most recent census data.

The readjustment, which is carried out on a province-wide basis, is grounded initially in the Act itself. The legislation defines two main guidelines for the decision making of a provincial electoral boundary commission: first, it should seek the best possible balance in the size of the different electoral districts; and second, it should respect communities of interest so as not to unduly lessen their role.

Section 15 of the Act states the following:

15. (1) In preparing its report, each commission for a province shall, subject to subsection (2), be governed by the following rules:

  • (a) the division of the province into electoral districts and the description of the boundaries thereof shall proceed on the basis that the population of each electoral district in the province as a result thereof shall, as close as reasonably possible, correspond to the electoral quota for the province, that is to say, the quotient obtained by dividing the population of the province as ascertained by the census by the number of members of the House of Commons to be assigned to the province as calculated by the Chief Electoral Officer under subsection 14(1); and

  • (b) the commission shall consider the following in determining reasonable electoral district boundaries:
    • (i) the community of interest or community of identity in or the historical pattern of an electoral district in the province, and
    • (ii) a manageable geographic size for electoral districts in sparsely populated, rural or northern regions of the
      province.

(2) The commission may depart from the application of the rule set out in paragraph (1)(a) in any case where the commission considers it necessary or desirable to depart therefrom

  • (a) in order to respect the community of interest or community of identity in or the historical pattern of an electoral district in the province; or
  • (b) in order to maintain a manageable geographic size for districts in sparsely populated, rural or northern regions of the province,

but, in departing from the application of the rule set out in paragraph (1)(a), the commission shall make every effort to ensure that, except in circumstances viewed by the commission as being extraordinary, the population of each electoral district in the province remains within twenty-five percent more or twenty-five percent less of the electoral quota for the province.

In its work, the Commission is also required to apply the thrust of the official languages policy in an informed manner.

In presenting the outcome of its deliberations, the Commission wishes to assure citizens of its intent to do justice to the exercise of the people’s sovereignty, while maintaining awareness of the important role played by elected officials and the low regard in which they are held in our societies today. We hope that the fruits of our labours will properly reflect those intentions.

First of all, our work is primarily statistical in nature and requires an understanding of the context; this can be obtained by briefly referring to the report produced in 2003 by the Commission of that time (see Table 1). We find that none of the 75 readjusted electoral districts in 2003 had a positive variance equal to or in excess of 10%, the greatest being 9.51%. However, 6 electoral districts had a negative variance equal to or in excess of –10%, the greatest being –20.19%. In addition, 16 electoral districts had a positive or negative variance below 2% of the established quota of 96,500 residents per electoral district. The remaining 53 electoral districts had positive or negative variances of between 2% and 9.99%, and more than two thirds of these variances were positive.

Table 1

2003 breakdown of the 75 electoral districts, by variance 2003 Report

Quota: 96,500

Variance

Number of districts

≥ +10%

between 5% and 9.99%

19

between 2% and 4.99%

17

between 1.99% and –1.99%

16

between –2% and –4.99%

8

between –5% and –9.99%

9

≤ –10%

6

Total

75

Greatest variances: +9.51% –20.19%

This was the starting point for the current Commission’s work. Two changes had arisen since 2003, however. The first was a natural change, revealed by the 2011 Census data. The second change was political in nature; it involved the addition of 3 electoral districts within Quebec’s territory. The redistribution therefore had to be carried out within 78 electoral districts, on the basis of a new quota of 101,321 residents in each. To fully explain the scope of our task, we think it is helpful to describe the two steps we undertook to assess the scope of the Commission’s mandate.

First of all, we were curious to see what our starting point would have been if, without the addition of 3 districts, we divided the demographic data resulting from the 2011 Census, that is, a population of 7,903,001. By dividing that population into 75 electoral districts, we obtained a theoretical quota of 105,373 residents in each existing district before redistribution. By breaking down the measured variances on that basis, we arrived at the result presented in Table 2.

Table 2

2012 breakdown of electoral districts, by variance (before redistribution)

Quota: 105,373 (for 75 electoral districts)

Variance

Number of districts

≥ 25%

2

between 15% and 24.99%

5

between 10% and 14.99%

4

between 2% and 9.99%

19

between 1.99% and –1.99%

14

between –2% and –9.99%

21

between –10% and –14.99%

3

between –15% and –24.99%

5

≤ –25%

2

Total

75

Greatest variances: +36.79% –32.25%

Proceeding in this manner, we found that the maximum variance of 25% allowed by the Act — positive or negative — from the established quota would have been exceeded in 4 districts, and the greatest variances would have been 36.79% and –32.25%. In addition to those 4 cases, 9 districts would have had a positive variance exceeding 10%, while 8 districts would have had a negative variance exceeding –10%. That would have left 54 districts with positive or negative variances under 10%; in 14 of these, the variance would have been under 2%.

Table 3

2012 breakdown of electoral districts, by variance (before redistribution)

Quota: 101,321 (for 75 electoral districts)

Variance

Number of districts

≥ 25%

4

between 15% and 24.99%

7

between 10% and 14.99%

7

between 2% and 9.99%

26

between 1.99% and –1.99%

12

between –2% and –9.99%

12

between –10% and –14.99%

1

between –15% and –24.99%

5

≤ –25%

1

Total

75

Greatest variances: +42.26% –29.54%

However, the addition of 3 electoral districts appreciably changed the overall picture. We first calculated the variances on the basis of the established quota of 101,321 residents per electoral district. We performed this calculation using the map of 75 electoral districts in place before we began our work. Some might say the exercise was artificial because in reality, the 2012 redistribution had to be conducted using an electoral map that now had 78 electoral districts. However, this allowed us to project more specifically the nature and scope of the work to be done. We thus noted that the number of mandatory corrections had increased: 5 districts had variances of over 25%, 4 of them positive; this indicated a problem of under-representation. The measured variances were larger, ranging from –29.54% to +42.26%. We thus found that no fewer than 44 districts had a positive variance over 2% in relation to the established quota based on the 2011 Census. We might have thought it would be easy to redistribute those variances with the addition of 3 districts, but such a conclusion did not take into account the fact that, as the saying goes, the devil is in the details!

Adding an electoral district in a given region creates a domino effect that might entail major or minor changes to the boundaries of a substantial number of other districts. We also had to bear in mind the objective of achieving a demographic balance between all electoral districts. In addition, we tried to respect the “boundaries” of the perceived communities of interest to the best of our knowledge. Accordingly, wherever it seemed reasonably possible to do so, we mapped the limits of the new districts by making them correspond to other existing limits: regional county municipalities (RMCs), municipalities, boroughs, etc. To complement that “strategy,” we selected other objective boundaries — either natural ones such as watercourses, or boundaries based on infrastructure such as railways (sometimes out of use), highways or thoroughfares that seem to structure movement within a given territory. Beyond that initial series of criteria, we paid attention to the presence of linguistic or, in some cases, ethnic communities. Finally, to arrive at the version of our proposal presented in the Schedule and Table 4, we had to make a number of somewhat arbitrary decisions. . . rendered in a controlled manner in discussions among ourselves.

Table 4

Breakdown of the 78 electoral districts, by variance

Quota: 101,321 2012

Variance

≥ 10%

between 5% and 9.99%

between 2% and 4.99%

between –1.99% and 1.99%

Electoral districts

-Gaspésie—
Les Îles

-Rimouski

-Elzéar-Bernier

-Mille-Îles

-Paul-Sauvé

-Petite-Nation

-Pierre-Legardeur

-Saint-Jean

-Shefford

-Sherbrooke

-Beauce

-John-Peters-Humphrey

-La Chute

-Lac-Saint-Jean

-Lotbinière—
Mégantic

-Louis-Fréchette

-Outaouais

-Outremont

-Saint-Lambert

-Soulanges

-Terrebonne

-Trois-Rivières

-Vaudreuil

-Abitibi—
Témiscamingue

-Anne-Hébert

-Bourassa

-Brome—
Missisquoi

-Cap-Rouge

-Charlevoix—
Saguenay

-Châteauguay

-Compton—
Stanstead

-Curé-Labelle

-Denis-Benjamin-
Viger

-Étienne-Parent

-Hautes-
Laurentides—
Pontiac

-Hochelaga

-Laurentides

-Lévis

-Lignery

-Longueuil

-MacDonald-
Langstaff

-Montarville

-Montréal-Est

-Nicolas-Vincent

-Ozias-Leduc

-Paul-Ragueneau

-Plateau—Mile End

-Richmond—
Arthabaska

-Rivière-des-Prairies

-Saint-Hyacinthe—
Bagot

-Saint-Léonard

-Sault-au-Récollet

-Urbain-Brossard

-Verdun

-Wilder-Penfield

Total (78)

2

8

13

32


Variance

between –2%
and –4.99%

between –5%
and –9.99%

≤ –10%

Electoral districts

-Alfred-Dubuc

-Alfred-Pellan

-Aylmer

-Côte-de-Beaupré

-Drummond

-Lachine—LaSalle

-Montcalm

-Papineau

-Québec

-Roger-Lemelin

-Sainte-Rose

-Verchères—
Les Patriotes

-Ville-Marie

-George-
Étienne-Cartier

-Gilles-Villeneuve

-Idola-
Saint-Jean

-Joliette

-Lac-Saint-Louis

-Manicouagan

-Maurice-Richard

-Paul-Comtois

-Shawinigane

-Abitibi—Nunavik

Total (78)

13

9

1

Greatest variances: Rimouski: +10.98 %

Abitibi—Nunavik: –15.64 %

The ideal would be a redistribution based on a perfectly egalitarian distribution of Quebec’s population within 78 electoral districts; in practice, this was an unattainable objective. Nevertheless, we made every effort to achieve the best possible result. Accordingly, we managed to map 32 electoral districts, each with a population that varies less than 2% from the established quota of 101,321 residents. A further 26 districts each have a variance between 2% and 4.99%, positive in 13 cases and negative in 13. Of the remaining 20 electoral districts with a variance of 5% or more, only 3 have a variance equal to or greater than 10%; the greatest positive variance is +10.98% in Rimouski, and the greatest negative variance is –15.64% in Abitibi—Nunavik.

We think that this is a satisfactory result, all things considered. We are aware that some stakeholders in Quebec society might have a somewhat different opinion. Nevertheless, we can say that we spared no effort to ensure an equitable representation of electors throughout the province, while remaining sensitive to geographical and cultural factors and how they fit into the general picture.

The electoral map of Quebec has thus changed substantially, most notably with the addition of 3 electoral districts: 2 in Montréal’s northern rim and 1 in its southern rim. Further, under the 25% rule set out in subsection 15(2) of the Act, we had to reduce the number of electoral districts in Eastern Quebec by 1 and establish another district elsewhere. For that district, the Commission members chose a site on the Island of Montréal.

In our opinion, the proposed changes reflect the new reality of Quebec, with the current trend toward higher-density urban centres instead of suburban sprawl. The City of Montréal is no exception to this pronounced trend, as evidenced by the Metropolitan Land Use and Development Plan for Greater Montréal; this projects that more than 300,000 new households will be established in the area over the next 20 years, containing over half a million people.

These changes led us to seek new names for a large number of electoral districts. Under the circumstances, we felt it appropriate to take account of the new reality, while drawing on the geography and history of the districts concerned.

We also drew on the guidelines of the Geographical Names Board of Canada concerning the selection of names for federal electoral districts:

The name of a federal electoral district should only be kept from one readjustment to another if it is suitable and if the new district falls essentially within the boundaries of the former electoral district. When the boundaries of an electoral district are changed considerably, one must, without question, consider assigning it another name.

The Board also recommends that the names selected be those that “immediately lead one to recall the province” in which the districts are situated, ideally geographical names. However, given the large number of districts to which we had to assign a new name, we considered it appropriate to designate a number of them by the name of a person rather than a geographical name. This avoids any ambiguity. It also gives recognition to certain persons and sites prominent in Quebec’s history and connected with the areas in which the districts are situated.

The Commission decided to keep the existing names of the following 22 districts, with only minor or no changes:

— Abitibi—Témiscamingue  
— Alfred-Pellan  
— Beauce  
— Bourassa  
— Brome—Missisquoi  
— Compton—Stanstead  
— Drummond  
— Hochelaga  
— Joliette  
— Lac-Saint-Louis  
— Manicouagan  
— Montcalm
— Outremont
— Papineau
— Richmond—Arthabaska
— Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot
— Saint-Jean
— Saint-Lambert
— Shefford
— Sherbrooke
— Trois-Rivières
— Verchères—Les Patriotes

For the 56 other districts, however, the Commission has proposed new names, for the reasons explained at the beginning of the description of each of these districts.

The Commission has prepared a proposal dividing the province into 78 electoral districts. They are identified in this report by their name, population and description, illustrated by maps.

Persons wishing to make representations or attend a Commission hearing are directed to the rules of procedure set out below.

Part Ⅱ — Rules of Procedure

The following rules of procedure were adopted by the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission established for Quebec under authority of section 18 of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, Chapter E-3.

  1. The following terms shall be interpreted as follows:
    • (a) “Act”: the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, R.S.C. 1985, Chapter E-3, as amended;
    • (b) “advertisement”: an advertisement or notice published pursuant to subsections 19(2) and (3) of the Act and giving notice of the date, time and place of the Commission’s public sittings;
    • (c) “Chair”: the Chair of the Commission or the Deputy Chair, as the case may be;
    • (d) “Commission”: the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission established for Quebec pursuant to section 3 of the Act and created by proclamation on February 21, 2012;
    • (e) “notice”: the notice in writing that must be addressed to the Commission Secretary by any person interested in making representations within 23 days of the date of publication of the last advertisement, as required by subsection 19(5) of the Act;
    • (f) “person”: any individual or legal entity, whether under public or private law;
    • (g) “representation”: a representation made, pursuant to subsection 19(5) of the Act, by a person with an interest in the geographical boundaries or in the names of one or more electoral districts in Quebec;
    • (h) “Secretary”: the person who acts as Commission Secretary, so named pursuant to subsection 16(2) of the Act; and
    • (i) “sitting”: a public sitting held by the Commission under section 19 of the Act.
  2. For the purpose of calculating the 23-day limit prescribed by subsection 19(5) of the Act, the postmark on a mailed notice and the date of receipt by the Commission appearing on the notice sent by fax or by electronic means will establish the date it was given. Where it is impossible to determine the date it was forwarded, the Commission will decide the admissibility of the notice.
  3. Any person who wishes to make representations at a sitting within the meaning of Rule 1, paragraph (e) must give notice of his or her intentions in accordance with Rule 1, paragraph (b).
  4. The notice must indicate:
    • (a) the name and address of the person who wishes to make representations;
    • (b) the nature of the representations;
    • (c) the nature of the interest in question;
    • (d) the official language in which the person wishes to be heard;
    • (e) the grounds for the representations concerning the boundaries and the name of the electoral district;
      (f) the relevant references and documentation that the person intends to cite or communicate; and
    • (g) the sitting of the Commission at which the person wishes to be heard.
  5. The quorum required for a sitting of the Commission is two members.
  6. Any person who requires special arrangements to be made so that the person can make representations at a sitting must inform the Commission Secretary thereof.
  7. Any person who wishes to make representations at a sitting can be represented by only one representative, unless the Commission decides otherwise.
  8. The Commission shall prepare a schedule for hearing representations, to be provided by the Commission Secretary to the persons who have asked to be heard.
  9. If a sitting cannot be held or the representations cannot be completed within the scheduled time, the Chair may postpone or adjourn that sitting.
  10. The Secretary shall then give notice of the date, time and place of the new sitting or the date of adjournment of the sitting to the interested persons. A formal notice shall be given by means deemed appropriate by the Commission.

Dated at Montréal, this 28th day of June, 2012.

________________________________________
JULES ALLARD, S.J.C
Chair
________________________________________
RAYMOND HUDON, Ph.D.
Member
________________________________________
J. MICHEL DOYON, Q.C., Ad.E., Ph.D.
Member

Warning

To all participants in public sittings:

Any oral or written submission or representation made to the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Quebec is deemed to be a public submission. As such, it is accessible to the general public and may be included in the Commission’s reports, published by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada and posted on the Internet.

Part Ⅲ — Reminder of Mandatory Terms and Conditions

The Act precludes the Commission from hearing, during its public sittings, representations from any person who has not submitted a written notice in accordance with subsection 19(5) of the Act within 23 days after the date of publication of the last advertisement, as specified in subsection 19(2).

The notice must be forwarded no later than August 27, 2012, and addressed to:

Ms. Diane Pellerin
Commission Secretary
Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Quebec
800 De La Gauchetière Street W
Northeast Portal, Suite 7350
Montréal, Quebec
H5A 1L6
Telephone: 514-283-4049
Toll-free telephone: 1-855-726-4111
Fax: 514-875-8702
Toll-free fax: 1-855-726-4112
Email: quebec@rfed-rcf.ca

Notices may also be submitted electronically by completing the required form online. Go to www.redecoupage-federal-redistribution.ca, select the province and then click “Public Hearings.”

Part ⅠV — Dates and Locations of Public Hearings

To give all interested persons the opportunity to make their representations regarding the proposed boundaries and names of the electoral districts, the Commission shall hold public hearings on the following dates and at the following locations:

SAGUENAY, Courthouse, Room 4.02, 227 Racine Street East (Chicoutimi), Wednesday, September 5, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

LÉVIS, Lévis Convention and Exhibition Centre, Executive Boardroom 1, 5750 J.-B.-Michaud Street, Thursday, September 6, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

QUÉBEC, Courthouse, Room 4.11, 300 Jean-Lesage Boulevard, Friday, September 7, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

GASPÉ, Courthouse, Room 001, 11 De la Cathédrale Street, Tuesday, September 11, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

MATANE, Riôtel Matane, Saint-Jérôme Room, 250 Du Phare Avenue East, Wednesday, September 12, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

RIVIÈRE-DU-LOUP, Courthouse, Room 4.10, 33 De la Cour Street, Friday, September 14, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

SHAWINIGAN, Courthouse, Room 2.04, 212 6th Street, Tuesday, September 18, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

THETFORD MINES, Courthouse, Room 1.03, 693 Saint-Alphonse Street North, Wednesday, September 19, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

LAVAL, Courthouse, Room 1.07, 2800 Saint-Martin Boulevard West, Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

SAINT-JÉRÔME, Courthouse, Room B1.02, 25 De Martigny Street West, Thursday, October 18, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

MONTRÉAL, Courthouse, Room 14.09, 1 Notre-Dame Street East, Friday, October 19, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

VALLEYFIELD, Courthouse, Room 6, 74 Académie Street, Tuesday, October 23, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

LONGUEUIL, Courthouse, Room 1.29, 1111 Jacques-Cartier Street East, Wednesday, October 24, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

SAINT-JEAN, Courthouse, Room 1.08, 109 Saint-Charles Street, Thursday, October 25, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

SHERBROOKE, Courthouse, Room 7, 375 King Street West, Friday, October 26, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

GATINEAU, Courthouse, Room 11, 17 Laurier Street (Hull), Wednesday, October 31, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

VAL-D’OR, Courthouse, 900 7th Street, Friday, November 2, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

SEPT-ÎLES, Courthouse, Room 1.01, 425 Laure Boulevard, Tuesday, November 6, 2012, at 9:30 a.m.

Schedule — Maps, Proposed Boundaries and Names of Electoral Districts

This publication contains a provincial map of Quebec, four (4) maps for Southern and Eastern Quebec, individual maps of cities including more than one electoral district, and a map and description of each of the province’s seventy-eight (78) electoral districts.

The sources used in the preparation of the maps in this atlas are from Natural Resources Canada (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing) and Statistics Canada (Geography Division).

The following applies to all the descriptions contained in this publication:

  • (a) for the purposes of descriptions of electoral districts, the term “regional county municipality” means a corporation having jurisdiction over a territory in respect of which letters patent have been issued pursuant to the provisions of Division 1, Chapter 1, Title II of the Land Use Planning and Development Act (c. A-19.1 of the Revised Statutes of Quebec) following the coming into force of section 12.1 (S.Q. 1979, c. 51, s. 251) of the Territorial Division Act (c. D-11 of the Revised Statutes of Quebec);

  • (b) reference to “boulevard”, “road”, “street”, “river”, “highway”, “avenue”, “railway”, “transmission line”, “channel”, “bridge”, “canal”, “crescent”, “basin” or “effluent” signifies their centre line unless otherwise described;

  • (c) all villages, cities, towns and Indian reserves lying within the perimeter of an electoral district are included in it unless otherwise described;

  • (d) wherever a word or expression is used to designate a territorial division, that word or expression designates the territorial division as it existed or was delimited on the first day of March, 2011; and

  • (e) the translation of the terms “street”, “avenue” and “boulevard” follows Treasury Board standards. The translation of all other public thoroughfare designations is based on commonly used terms but has no official recognition.

The population figure of each electoral district is derived from the 2011 decennial census conducted by Statistics Canada.

Abitibi—Nunavik

(Population: 85,475)

(Map 1)

Reason: The name was chosen for the sake of simplicity. The southern part of the electoral district covers part of Abitibi, while Nunavik comprises its northern part. The main city in the electoral district is Val-d’Or. The neighbouring electoral district of Abitibi—Témiscamingue has some large cities, including Amos and Rouyn-Noranda. The word “Abitibi” is already used in the names of two electoral districts on the electoral map established in 2002.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-de-l’Or, including: Lac-Simon Indian Reserve; the Kitcisakik Indian settlement;

  • (b) the Equivalent Territory of Jamésie, including: the Cree village municipalities and the Cree reserved lands of Chisasibi, Eastmain, Mistissini, Nemiscau, Waskaganish, Waswanipi and Wemindji; the Indian settlement of Oujé-Bougoumou; and

  • (c) the Territory of the Kativik Regional Administration excepting that part lying southerly of latitude 56°00′N and easterly of longitude 70°00′W, including the Cree Village Municipality and the Cree Reserved Land of Whapmagoostui; the Nordic village municipalities of Akulivik, Aupaluk, Inukjuak, Ivujivik, Kangiqsualujjuaq, Kangiqsujuaq, Kangirsuk, Kuujjuaq, Kuujjuarapik, Puvirnituq, Quaqtaq, Salluit, Tasiujaq and Umiujaq.

Abitibi—Témiscamingue

(Population: 102,794)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Rouyn-Noranda;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Témiscamingue, including: Timiskaming Indian Reserve No. 19 and Eagle Village First Nation-Kipawa Indian Reserve; the Hunter’s Point and Winneway Indian settlements;

  • (c) the Regional County Municipality of Abitibi-Ouest; and

  • (d) the Regional County Municipality of Abitibi, including the Pikogan Indian Reserve.

Alfred-Dubuc

(Population: 98,193)

(Map 13)

Reason: Julien-Édouard-Alfred Dubuc, a businessman and politician, played an important role in the Saguenay region. Only one of his first names, “Alfred,” has been used for the sake of simplicity.

Consisting of:

  • (a) those parts of the City of Saguenay comprised of the borough of Jonquière and that part of the borough of Chicoutimi lying northerly of the Saguenay River;

  • (b) those parts of the Regional County Municipality of Fjord-du-Saguenay comprised of the unorganized territory of Lac-Ministuk and that part lying northerly of the Saguenay River; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Lac-Saint-Jean-Est comprised of the municipalities of Labrecque, Lamarche and Saint-Nazaire.

Alfred-Pellan

(Population: 98,010)

(Map 8)

Consisting of that part of the City of Laval lying northeasterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the City of Laval with Papineau Avenue (Athanase-David Bridge); thence southeasterly along said avenue to Laurentides Boulevard; thence generally southwesterly and southeasterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 440 (Laval Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 19 (Papineau Highway); thence southeasterly along said highway to the southeasterly limit of the City of Laval.

Anne-Hébert

(Population: 100,590)

(Map 15)

Reason: This electoral district stretches from the westerly limit of the electoral district of Cap-Rouge to the limit of the electoral district of Trois-Rivières. Given that the most populated part of the district lies all along Royal Road, choosing a representative place name appeared to be a delicate matter. The name “Anne-Hébert,” in memory of a famous writer who was born in this electoral district, seemed most appropriate.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Jacques-Cartier comprised of: the municipalities of Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier and Shannon; the cities of Fossambault-sur-le-Lac, Lac-Saint-Joseph and Sainte-Catherine-de-la-Jacques-Cartier;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Portneuf, except for the unorganized territory of Lac-Lapeyrère;

  • (c) that part of the City of Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Highway No. 138; thence southwesterly along said highway to Tessier Road; thence southeasterly along said road to de la Butte Road; thence easterly along said road to du Lac Road; thence generally southeasterly and easterly along said road to Adrienne-Choquette Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Décharge du Lac Saint-Augustin; thence generally southerly along said effluent to the St. Lawrence River; thence following a line southerly to the limit of said city;

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Mékinac consisting of the parish municipalities of Saint-Adelphe and Saint-Séverin;

  • (e) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Chenaux:
    • (i) except for the parish municipalities of Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel and Saint-Narcisse, and

    • (ii) comprised of that part of the Parish Municipality of Saint-Maurice and that part of the Municipality of Champlain lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the southwesterly limit of the Parish Municipality of Saint-Maurice and its intersection with Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to the westerly limit of the Municipality of Champlain; and
  • (f) that part of the City of Trois-Rivières lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing in the St. Lawrence River from a point situated at latitude 46°22′05″N and longitude 72°28′50″W; thence northwesterly to the intersection of Notre-Dame Street East and Sainte-Madeleine Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Saint-Laurent Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Fusey Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Duplessis Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Thibeau Boulevard; thence generally northwesterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence generally northeasterly along said highway to the easternmost limit of said city.

Aylmer

(Population: 98,873)

(Map 7)

Reason: This electoral district consists mainly of the former city of Aylmer and its immediate vicinity.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Collines-de-l’Outaouais comprised of the municipalities of Cantley, Chelsea, Pontiac and La Pêche; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Gatineau lying westerly and southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with the southerly production of Saint-Raymond Boulevard; thence northerly and easterly following said production and said boulevard to the Gatineau Parkway; thence northwesterly following said parkway to the northerly limit of said city.

Beauce

(Population: 103,840)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Beauce-Sartigan and Robert-Cliche;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Le Granit, excepting: the Township Municipality of Stratford; the municipalities of Courcelles, Lac-Drolet, Lambton, Nantes, Milan, Sainte-Cécile-de-Whitton, Saint-Romain, Saint-Sébastien and Stornoway; and

  • (c) the Regional County Municipality of La Nouvelle-Beauce, excepting: the parish municipalities of Sainte-Hénédine and Saint-Lambert-de-Lauzon; the municipalities of Scott, Saint-Bernard and Saint-Isidore.

Bourassa

(Population: 100,286)

(Map 11)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville situated northeast of Papineau Avenue and Highway No. 19 (Papineau Highway); and

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Montréal-Nord.

Brome—Missisquoi

(Population: 99,947)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Brome-Missisquoi;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Haut-Richelieu comprised of: the Parish Municipality of Saint-Sébastien; the municipalities of Noyan, Saint-Georges-de-Clarenceville, Venise-en-Québec, Henryville and Sainte-Brigide-d’Iberville; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Memphrémagog excepting: the City of Stanstead; the village municipalities of Ayers’s Cliff and North Hatley; the municipalities of Hatley, Ogden and Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley; the township municipalities of Hatley and Stanstead.

Cap-Rouge

(Population: 100,845)

(Map 12)

Reason: The name of this electoral district is a reminder of the first attempt to establish a French settlement, at the mouth of the Cap-Rouge River, by Jacques Cartier in 1541.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of L’Ancienne-Lorette; and

  • (b) that part of the cities of Québec and Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of the City of Québec and Highway No. 73 (Henri-IV Highway); thence northerly along said highway to Highway No. 540 (Duplessis Highway); thence westerly and northwesterly along said highway to Sainte-Foy Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Highway No. 73 (Henri-IV Highway); thence generally northwesterly along said highway to the transmission line; thence generally southwesterly along said transmission line to de l’Aéroport Road; thence northwesterly along said road and its production to the southerly limit of Valcartier Garrison; thence northeasterly along said limit to Pie-XI Boulevard North; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to the limit of the City of Québec; thence generally southwesterly and southeasterly along said limit to Highway No. 138; thence southwesterly along said highway to Tessier Road; thence southeasterly along said road to de la Butte Road; thence easterly along said road to du Lac Road; thence southeasterly and easterly along said road to Adrienne-Choquette Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Décharge du Lac Saint-Augustin; thence generally southerly along said effluent to the St. Lawrence River; thence southerly along a line to the limit of said city; thence generally easterly along the limit of said cities to the point of commencement.

Charlevoix—Saguenay

(Population: 100,482)

(Map 13)

Reason: This electoral district includes part of the city of Saguenay as well as the Charlevoix region. The name selected indicates the link between the two areas, primarily a result of the colonization of Saguenay by a number of families originally from La Malbaie.

Consisting of:

  • (a) those parts of the City of Saguenay comprised of the borough of La Baie and that part of the borough of Chicoutimi lying southerly of the Saguenay River;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Fjord-du-Saguenay lying southerly of the Saguenay River, consisting of: the municipalities of Ferland and Boileau, L’Anse-Saint-Jean, Petit-Saguenay, Rivière Éternité and Saint-Félix-d’Otis; the unorganized territory of Lalemant; and

  • (c) the regional county municipalities of Charlevoix-Est and Charlevoix.

Châteauguay

(Population: 101,475)

(Map 3)

Reason: The name of this electoral district refers to the famous Battle of the Châteauguay, in which Salaberry and a small band of Canadian militiamen repulsed the American forces, preventing them from taking Montréal. The War of 1812 was the Americans’ last attempt to invade Canada.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Les Jardins-de-Napierville;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Haut-Saint-Laurent comprised of: the municipalities of Franklin, Howick and Saint-Chrysostome; the Township Municipality of Havelock; the Parish Municipality of Très-Saint-Sacrement;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Beauharnois-Salaberry comprised of the municipalities of Sainte-Martine and Saint-Urbain-Premier; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Roussillon comprised of: the cities of Châteauguay, Léry and Mercier; the Parish Municipality of Saint-Isidore.

Compton—Stanstead

(Population: 102,622)

(Map 14)

Consisting of :

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Coaticook and Le Haut-Saint-François;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Val-Saint-François comprised of the Municipality of Stoke;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Memphrémagog comprised of: the Town of Stanstead; the village municipalities of Ayer’s Cliff and North Hatley; the municipalities of Hatley, Ogden and Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley; the township municipalities of Hatley and Stanstead; and

  • (d) the City of Sherbrooke, excepting:
    • (i) the boroughs of Jacques-Cartier and Mont-Bellevue,

    • (ii) that part of the borough of Fleurimont lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the borough of Fleurimont with Highway No. 610 (Louis-Bilodeau Highway); thence generally southeasterly along said highway to its intersection with King Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to the limit of said borough, and

    • (iii) that part of the borough of Brompton lying southerly of Highway No. 610 (Louis-Bilodeau Highway).

Côte-de-Beaupré

(Population: 96,817)

(Map 12)

Reason: This electoral district is composed primarily of the area between Beauport Bay and the Charlevoix region. As early as 1626, Champlain called the area “Côte des beaux prés” [shoreline of lovely meadows].

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of La-Côte-de-Beaupré and L’Île-d’Orléans;

  • (b) that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of du Lac Boulevard and the easterly limit of said city; thence generally northwesterly and southwesterly along said limit to de la Grande-Ligne Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Jacques-Bédard Street; thence northeasterly along said street to Highway No. 73 (Laurentienne Highway); thence southeasterly along said highway to du Lac Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to the point of commencement;

  • (c) that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said city with the Île-d’Orléans Bridge; thence northwesterly from said bridge to the north shore of the St. Lawrence River; thence southwesterly along said shore to the production of Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence generally northwesterly along said production and said highway to Seigneuriale Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Louis-XIV Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to the westerly limit of the borough of Beauport of said city; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to its intersection with the limit of said city; thence northeasterly and generally southeasterly and southwesterly to the point of commencement; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Jacques-Cartier comprised of: the City of Lac Delage; the Municipality of the United Townships of Stoneham-et-Tewkesbury; the municipalities of Lac-Beauport and Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval; and the unorganized territory of Lac-Croche.

Curé-Labelle

(Population: 99,729)

(Map 3)

Reason: The name of this electoral district refers to the colonizing efforts of Antoine Labelle, a Catholic priest better known as Curé Labelle. He was the principal promoter of construction of the railway line that linked Montréal to Saint-Jérôme, enabling the development of this part of the Laurentides region.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Pays-d’en-Haut comprised of the Parish Municipality of Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Rivière-du-Nord comprised of the City of Saint-Jérôme and the Municipality of Sainte-Sophie; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Thérèse-De Blainville comprised of the City of Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines.

Denis-Benjamin-Viger

(Population: 101,360)

(Map 11)

Reason: A lawyer, journalist and politician, Denis-Benjamin Viger held the Seigneury of Île Bizard and was one of the biggest landowners in the city of Montréal in the early 19th century.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Dollard-Des Ormeaux lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northerly limit of the City of Pointe-Claire and its intersection with des Sources Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to the southwesterly limit of the borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro of the City of Montréal; thence northwesterly along said limit to Millette Street;

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of L’Île-Bizard—Sainte-Geneviève; and

  • (c) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said borough with des Sources Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to Riverdale Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to Riviera Street; thence northwesterly along said street and its production to the northeasterly limit of the borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro.

Drummond

(Population: 98,681)

(Map 3)

Consisting of the Regional County Municipality of Drummond.

Elzéar-Bernier

(Population: 111,239)

(Map 4)

Reason: Born in L’Islet, Joseph-Elzéar Bernier was a famous ship captain and explorer. In 1909, he erected a plaque on Melville Island, asserting Canada’s sovereignty over the Arctic.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Kamouraska, L’Islet and Montmagny;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Rivière-du-Loup, including Cacouna Indian Reserve No. 22 and Whitworth Indian Reserve No. 21; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Témiscouata excepting: the Town of Dégelis; the municipalities of Auclair, Biencourt, Lac-des-Aigles, Lejeune and Saint-Juste-du-Lac; the Parish Municipality of Saint-Michel-du-Squatec.

Étienne-Parent

(Population: 99,927)

(Map 12)

Reason: A native of Beauport, Étienne Parent was editor of the newspaper Le Canadien and, for a time, the intellectual leader of the Patriote Party. Parent served as the first official librarian for the National Assembly.

Consisting of that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said city with the Île-d’Orléans Bridge; thence northwesterly from said bridge to the north shore of the St. Lawrence River; thence southwesterly along said shore to the production of Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence generally northwesterly along said production and said highway to Seigneuriale Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Louis-XIV Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to the northeasterly limit of the borough of Charlesbourg; thence generally northwesterly and southwesterly along said limit to du Lac Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 73 (Laurentienne Highway); thence generally southerly along said highway to Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to Saint-David Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to Royal Road; thence northeasterly and southeasterly along said road to de la Station Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue and du Cheminot Avenue to Sainte-Anne Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to the Beauport River; thence southerly along said river to its mouth; thence generally southeasterly to the southeasterly limit of the City of Québec; thence northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Gaspésie—Les Îles

(Population: 111,761)

(Map 5)

Reason: This electoral district includes the entire Gaspé Peninsula and the Îles-de-la-Madeleine.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Matane, La Haute-Gaspésie, La Côte-de-Gaspé, Rocher-Percé and Bonaventure;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Avignon comprised of: the Town of Carleton-sur-Mer; the municipalities of Maria and Nouvelle; the unorganized territory of Rivière-Nouvelle; including Gesgapegiag Indian Reserve;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Matapédia comprised of: the municipalities of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie and Saint-Vianney; the parish municipalities of Saint-Alexandre-des-Lacs, Saint-Tharcisius and Saint-Damase; the Village of Saint-Noël; the unorganized territories of Ruisseau-des-Mineurs and Lac-Casault; and

  • (d) the Equivalent Territory of Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine comprised of the municipalities of Grosse-Île and Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine.

George-Étienne-Cartier

(Population: 95,523)

(Map 11)

Reason: The name of this electoral district reflects the origin of the name of the municipality of Cartierville, which was established in 1906 and annexed to the city of Montréal 10 years later.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville lying northeasterly of Laurentien Boulevard and southwesterly of Saint-Laurent Boulevard and its northwesterly production to the limit of said city; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Saint-Laurent lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said borough with Sainte-Croix Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to O’Brien Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Henri-Bourassa Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Marcel-Laurin Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to the northwesterly limit of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville.

Gilles-Villeneuve

(Population: 95,553)

(Map 3)

Reason: This electoral district was named in memory of a famous resident of Berthierville who died accidentally in Zolder, Belgium. Gilles Villeneuve is considered one of the top 10 race car drivers in Formula 1 history.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of D’Autray and Maskinongé;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of L’Assomption comprised of the Parish Municipality of Saint-Sulpice;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Joliette comprised of the municipalities of Saint-Paul and Saint-Thomas; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Matawinie comprised of the Municipality of Saint-Félix-de-Valois.

Hautes-Laurentides—Pontiac

(Population: 100,090)

(Map 2)

Reason: This name was chosen to reflect the new reality of this electoral district: its northern part covers Hautes-Laurentides and its southern part covers Pontiac.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Antoine-Labelle, Papineau and Pontiac;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-de-la-Gatineau, including Rapid Lake Indian Reserve and Kitigan Zibi Indian Reserve; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Laurentides consisting of: the municipalities of Labelle, La Conception and La Minerve; the Parish Municipality of Brébeuf; the Township Municipality of Amherst.

Hochelaga

(Population: 101,723)

(Map 11)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Mercier—Hochelaga-Maisonneuve lying southwesterly and northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of the City of Montréal with the production of de Cadillac Street; thence northwesterly along said production to Notre-Dame Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Haig Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Sherbrooke Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Highway No. 25 (Trans-Canada Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the borough of Mercier—Hochelaga-Maisonneuve; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Ville-Marie lying westerly and northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the limit of the City of Montréal with the northerly limit of the borough of Ville-Marie in the St. Lawrence River (north of Sainte-Hélène Island); thence generally southwesterly along said river (skirting northerly and westerly around Sainte-Hélène Island) to the Jacques-Cartier Bridge; thence northwesterly along said bridge to Dorion Street; thence northwesterly along said street to the westerly limit of the borough of Ville-Marie.

Idola-Saint-Jean

(Population: 95,184)

(Map 11)

Reason: Idola Saint-Jean, a Montréal-born journalist and suffragette, was one of the pillars of the feminist movement that led to recognition of women’s right to vote in the early 1940s. A park in Montréal bears her name.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the part of the borough of Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said borough with Bourbonnière Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Rosemont Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to 19th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Bellechasse Street; thence northeasterly along said street to 20th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Beaubien Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to 19th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to the northwesterly limit of the borough of Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

John-Peters-Humphrey

(Population: 104,628)

(Map 11)

Reason: John Peters Humphrey was the first Director of the United Nations Division of Human Rights and the principal drafter of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. He was a founding member of the Canadian Society of Amnesty International and the Canadian Human Rights Foundation, now known as Equitas. A law professor at McGill, he was named to the Academy of Great Montrealers.

Consisting of a part of the cities of Côte-Saint-Luc, Dorval and Montréal, and of the cities of Hampstead and Mont-Royal, described as follows: commencing at the intersection of des Sources Boulevard and Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence generally easterly along said highway to its intersection with the Canadian National Railway; thence northeasterly along said railway to Sainte-Croix Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to its production on Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to the production of Wiseman Avenue; thence southeasterly along said production and said avenue to Stuart Avenue; thence southerly and southeasterly along said avenue to the production of said avenue and the northwesterly limit of the borough of Outremont of the City of Montréal; thence southwesterly along said limit to the southwesterly limit of the City of Mont-Royal; thence northwesterly along said limit to its intersection with the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southwesterly along said railway to Côte-des-Neiges Road; thence southeasterly along said road to de Courtrai Avenue; thence southwesterly along said avenue to Victoria Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to Queen-Mary Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Cedar Crescent Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Kingston Road; thence southwesterly along a line to the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the City of Westmount with Upper Belmont Avenue; thence generally southerly, southeasterly, southwesterly and southeasterly along said limit to Côte-Saint-Luc Road; thence generally southwesterly along said road to its intersection with the southwesterly limit of the City of Montréal-Ouest; thence southeasterly along said limit to its intersection with the Canadian National Railway; thence southerly along said railway to its intersection with Highway No. 20 (du Souvenir Highway); thence generally westerly along said highway to 55th Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to its intersection with the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to the westerly limit of the City of Dorval; thence generally northerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Joliette

(Population: 94,836)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Matawinie, excepting the Municipality of Saint-Félix-de-Valois, including Communauté Atikamekw de Manawan Indian Reserve; and

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Joliette, excepting the municipalities of Crabtree, Saint-Paul and Saint-Thomas.

La Chute

(Population: 105,429)

(Map 3)

Reason: The name “La Chute” has its origin in the 17th century, referring to a waterfall (chute) on the North River in the former Seigneury of Argenteuil. In the late 18th century, the population consisted mainly of Loyalists who had fled the American Revolution, and the area was known as “The Chute Settlement.” The name gradually changed to “La Chute,” then “Lachute” (one word) in the 19th century.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Mirabel;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Argenteuil;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Deux-Montagnes comprised of: the municipalities of Oka, Pointe-Calumet, Saint-Joseph-du-Lac and Saint-Placide; including the Indian settlement of Kanesatake; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Rivière-du-Nord comprised of the Municipality of Saint-Colomban.

Lachine—LaSalle

(Population: 97,979)

(Map 11)

Reason: The name of this electoral district derives from the two City of Montréal boroughs that it covers.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 20 with 55th Avenue; thence generally easterly along said highway to the southerly limit of the City of Montréal-Ouest; thence northeasterly along said limit to the southwesterly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest; thence southeasterly and northeasterly along said limit to Irwin Street; thence generally southerly along said street to Irwin Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to its intersection with the northeasterly limit of the borough of LaSalle; thence southwesterly along said limit to the intersection of the abandoned Canadian Pacific Railway with the southwesterly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest; thence generally southwesterly along said railway to Shevchenko Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard, Bishop-Power Boulevard and its production to the St. Lawrence River (Lachine Rapids); thence southwesterly along a line parallel with the north shore of said river and then southerly to the limit of said borough; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the easterly limit of the borough of Lachine; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the easterly limit of the City of Dorval; thence northerly along said limit to its intersection with the Canadian National Railway; thence easterly along said railway to 55th Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Lac-Saint-Jean

(Population: 105,783)

(Map 1)

Reason: This name refers to a major lake of the same name, one of the largest in Quebec, around which several population centres have gradually grown up.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Domaine-du-Roy, including Mashteuiatsh Indian Reserve;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Maria-Chapdelaine; and

  • (c) the Regional County Municipality of Lac-Saint-Jean-Est, excepting the municipalities of Labrecque, Lamarche and Saint-Nazaire.

Lac-Saint-Louis

(Population: 96,076)

(Map 11)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the cities of Baie-D’Urfé, Beaconsfield, Kirkland, L’Île-Dorval, Pointe-Claire and Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue;

  • (b) the Village Municipality of Senneville; and

  • (c) that part of the City of Dorval lying southerly of the Canadian National Railway.

Laurentides

(Population: 100,811)

(Map 3)

Reason: This electoral district mostly covers the area generally referred to as the Laurentides.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Les Laurentides, excepting the municipalities of Labelle, La Conception and La Minerve; the Parish Municipality of Brébeuf; the Township Municipality of Amherst; including Doncaster Indian Reserve No. 17;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Les Pays-d’en-Haut, excepting the Parish Municipality of Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Rivière-du-Nord comprised of: the City of Prévost; the Municipality of Saint-Hippolyte; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Montcalm comprised of the Municipality of Saint-Calixte.

Lévis

(Population: 100,358)

(Map 9)

Reason: A large part of the city of Lévis falls within this electoral district.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Nouvelle-Beauce comprised of: the parish municipalities of Sainte-Hénédine and Saint-Lambert-de-Lauzon; the municipalities of Saint-Bernard, Saint-Isidore and Scott; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Lévis lying westerly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with the easterly limit of the borough of Les Chutes-de-la-Chaudière-Est; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to a point situated at latitude 46°46′20N and longitude 71°12′30W; thence northwesterly along the production of the northeasterly limit of said borough to the northwesterly limit of said city.

Lignery

(Population: 99,811)

(Map 3)

Reason: The name of this electoral district refers to Constant Le Marchand de Lignery, a military officer who arrived in Canada in 1687 and after whom the city of Saint-Constant is named. It refers as well to Jacques Le Marchand de Lignery, pastor of the parish of Laprairie from 1731 to 1775. Saint-Constant and Laprairie are the main urban centres in this electoral district.

Consisting of that part of the Regional County Municipality of Roussillon comprised of: the cities of Candiac, Delson, La Prairie, Sainte-Catherine and Saint-Constant; the municipalities of Saint-Mathieu and Saint-Philippe; including Kahnawake Indian Reserve No. 14.

Longueuil

(Population: 101,315)

(Map 10)

Reason: This electoral district mostly covers the city of Longueuil.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Longueuil lying generally northerly and northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with the northwesterly production of Châteauguay Street; thence southeasterly along said production and said street to Perrault Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Sainte-Foy Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Curé-Poirier Boulevard West; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to de Chambly Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Sir-Wilfrid-Laurier Boulevard; thence easterly along said boulevard to the southeasterly limit of said city;

  • (b) that part of the City of Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville lying northerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northwesterly limit of said city and its intersection with Sir-Wilfrid-Laurier Boulevard; thence easterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 30 (de l’Acier Highway); thence northerly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of said city; and

  • (c) that part of the City of Boucherville lying westerly and southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the southeasterly limit of said city and its intersection with Highway No. 30 (de l’Acier Highway); thence northerly along said highway to Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to De Montarville Boulevard; thence generally northwesterly along said boulevard and its northwesterly production to the St. Lawrence River; thence generally northerly to the northwesterly limit of said city; including the Boucherville Islands.

Lotbinière—Mégantic

(Population: 105,323)

(Map 4)

Reason: This electoral district includes the northern part of the county of Lotbinière and a large part of the former electoral district of Mégantic—L’Érable.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Les Appalaches, L’Érable and Lotbinière; and

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Granit comprised of: the Township Municipality of Stratford; the municipalities of Courcelles, Lac-Drolet, Lambton, Nantes, Milan, Sainte-Cécile-de-Whitton, Saint-Romain, Saint-Sébastien and Stornoway.

Louis-Fréchette

(Population: 105,539)

(Map 9)

Reason: Louis-Honoré Fréchette was a journalist, writer, lawyer and politician born in Lévis. He was the first Canadian to receive the Montyon Prize, one of the most prestigious honours awarded by the Académie française, for his collection of poems entitled Les Fleurs boréales — Les Oiseaux de neige.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the regional county municipalities of Bellechasse and Les Etchemins; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Lévis lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said city and the southwesterly limit of the borough of Desjardins of said city; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to a point situated at latitude 46°46′20N and longitude 71°12′30W; thence northwesterly along the production of the southwesterly limit of said borough to the northwesterly limit of said city.

MacDonald-Langstaff

(Population: 101,155)

(Map 11)

Reason: Annie MacDonald Langstaff was the first woman to earn a law degree in Quebec, in 1914. After she was refused admission to the Bar, she waged a lengthy battle for the right of women to enter the legal profession. Women were finally admitted to the Bar for the first time in 1942.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville lying southwesterly of Laurentien Boulevard;

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Saint-Laurent lying southwesterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said borough with Marcel-Laurin Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to Henri-Bourassa Boulevard West; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to O’Brien Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue and Sainte-Croix Avenue to the Canadian National Railway; thence southerly along said railway to Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence generally southwesterly along said highway to the limit of said borough;

  • (c) that part of the City of Dorval lying northwesterly of Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway);

  • (d) that part of the City of Dollard-Des Ormeaux lying northeasterly of des Sources Boulevard; and

  • (e) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said borough with des Sources Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said limit to Milette Street; thence northwesterly along des Sources Boulevard to Riverdale Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to Riviera Street; thence northwesterly along said street and its production to the northeasterly limit of the borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro.

Manicouagan

(Population: 94,766)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Territory of the Kativik Regional Administration lying southerly of latitude 56°00′N and easterly of longitude 70°00′W, including the Naskapi Village Municipality of Kawawachikamach;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Caniapiscau, including: Lac John Indian Reserve and Matimekosh Indian Reserve No. 3; the Naskapi Reserved Lands of Kawawachikamach;

  • (c) the Regional County Municipality of Sept-Rivières, including: Malioténam Indian Reserve No. 27A and Uashat Indian Reserve No. 27;

  • (d) the Regional County Municipality of Minganie, including: Mingan Indian Reserve and Natashquan Indian Reserve No. 1;

  • (e) the Regional County Municipality of Le Golfe-du-Saint-Laurent, including: La Romaine Indian Reserve No. 2 and the Pakuashipi Indian settlement;

  • (f) the Regional County Municipality of La Haute-Côte-Nord, including Essipit Indian Reserve; and

  • (g) the Regional County Municipality of Manicouagan, including Betsiamites Indian Reserve.

Maurice-Richard

(Population: 95,322)

(Map 11)

Reason: Considered the best hockey player born in Quebec, Maurice Richard lived in Ahuntsic, in the heart of this electoral district.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville described as follows:

    • (i) lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said borough with Highway No. 19 (Papineau Highway); thence generally southeasterly along said highway to Papineau Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to its intersection with said borough, and

    • (ii) lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the City of Montréal with the northwesterly production of Saint-Laurent Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said production and said boulevard to the intersection of the southeasterly production of said boulevard with the southeasterly limit of said borough;

  • (b) that part of the borough of Villeray—Saint-Michel—Parc-Extension described as follows:
    • (i) lying northeasterly and northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the limit of said borough with the production of Saint-Laurent Boulevard; thence southeasterly along the production of said boulevard to Saint-Laurent Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to de Liège Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Foucher Street; thence southeasterly along said street to de Liège Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Christophe-Colomb Avenue; thence generally northerly along said avenue to the limit of said borough, and

    • (ii) lying northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said borough and Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to the northeasterly limit of said borough; and

  • (c) that part of the borough of Saint-Léonard lying northwesterly and southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the limit of said borough with Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to Viau Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to the production of said boulevard and the limit of said borough.

Mille-Îles

(Population: 108,875)

(Map 3)

Reason: The name of this electoral district derives from the fact that its southern boundary borders the Mille-Îles River.

Consisting of that part of the Regional County Municipality of Thérèse-De Blainville comprised of: the cities of Blainville, Lorraine, Bois-des-Filion, Sainte-Thérèse, and that part of the City of Rosemère lying northeasterly of the Agence métropolitaine de transport railway.

Montarville

(Population: 101,727)

(Map 10)

Reason: This name reflects the fact that much of the electoral district was formerly part of the Seigneury of Montarville.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Saint-Basile-le-Grand and the Municipality of McMasterville;

  • (b) that part of the City of Beloeil and the Municipality of Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of the Municipality of McMasterville with Bernard-Pilon Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the Municipality of Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil;

  • (c) that part of the City of Sainte-Julie lying southerly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway);

  • (d) that part of the City of Boucherville and the City of Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville lying easterly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of the City of Boucherville with Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to Highway No. 30 (de l’Acier Highway); thence southerly along said highway to Sir-Wilfrid-Laurier Boulevard; thence westerly along said boulevard to its intersection with the northwesterly limit of the City of Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville;

  • (e) that part of the City of Longueuil comprised of that part of the borough of Saint-Hubert lying southerly and northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of the City of Longueuil with Sir-Wilfrid-Laurier Boulevard; thence westerly along said boulevard to the Canadian National Railway; thence southeasterly along said railway to the northeasterly production of the northwesterly limit of the borough of Greenfield Park; thence southwesterly along said production to the limit of said borough; thence southeasterly along said limit to its intersection with the northwesterly production of Maricourt Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard and its production to the southeasterly limit of the City of Longueuil; and

  • (f) that part of the City of Carignan lying northerly and northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Cousineau Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to de Chambly Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the Acadie River; thence northeasterly along said river to the southwesterly limit of the City of Saint-Basile-le-Grand.

Montcalm

(Population: 97,471)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Montcalm, excepting the Municipality of Saint-Calixte;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Joliette comprised of the Municipality of Crabtree;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of L’Assomption comprised of: the City of L’Épiphanie; the Parish Municipality of L’Épiphanie; and

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Moulins comprised of the City of Mascouche.

Montréal-Est

(Population: 99,928)

(Map 11)

Reason: A major part of this electoral district covers the city of Montréal-Est.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Montréal-Est;

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Anjou;

  • (c) that part of the City of Montréal consisting of that part of the borough of Rivière-des-Prairies—Pointe-aux-Trembles lying southeasterly of Henri-Bourassa Boulevard East and southwesterly of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Boulevard and its southeasterly production to the southeasterly limit of said city; and

  • (d) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Mercier—Hochelaga-Maisonneuve lying northeasterly and southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of the City of Montréal with the southeasterly production of De Cadillac Street; thence northwesterly along said production to Notre-Dame Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Haig Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Sherbrooke Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Highway No. 25 (Trans-Canada Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the borough of Mercier—Hochelaga-Maisonneuve.

Nicolas-Vincent

(Population: 101,492)

(Map 12)

Reason: Nicolas Vincent was born in Wendake (Huron Village) in 1769. He was one of the greatest representatives of the Huron Nation, if not the greatest, and was one of its last hereditary chiefs.

Consisting of:

  • (a) Wendake Indian Reserve; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 73 (Laurentienne Highway) and Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence southwesterly along Highway No. 40 to the production of the easterly limit of the City of L’Ancienne Lorette; thence southwesterly along said production to Highway No. 573 (Henri-IV Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to the transmission line; thence southwesterly along said transmission line to de l’Aéroport Road; thence northwesterly along said road and its production to the southerly limit of Valcartier Garrison; thence northeasterly along said limit to Pie-XI Boulevard North; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to the northeasterly limit of the City of Québec; thence generally northeasterly, northwesterly and southeasterly to de la Grande-Ligne Road; then southeasterly along said road to Jacques-Bédard Street; thence northeasterly along said street to Highway No. 73 (Laurentienne Highway); thence generally southeasterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Outaouais

(Population: 103,759)

(Map 7)

Reason: The name of this electoral district derives from its proximity to the Outaouais (Ottawa) River.

Consisting of that part of the City of Gatineau described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with the southerly production of Saint-Raymond Boulevard; thence northerly and easterly along said production and said boulevard to the Gatineau Parkway; thence northwesterly along said parkway to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally northeasterly along the northerly limit of said city to the Gatineau River (Alonzo Bridge); thence northeasterly and southeasterly along du Pont Avenue and La Vérendrye Boulevard West to Highway No. 50 (de l’Outaouais Highway); thence northerly and easterly along said highway to Montée Paiement; thence southerly along Montée Paiement and its production generally southwesterly to the southerly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly along the limit of said city to the point of commencement.

Outremont

(Population: 103,666)

(Map 11)

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the limit of the City of Westmount with De Maisonneuve Boulevard West; thence generally northwesterly and southwesterly along the northeasterly and northwesterly limits of said city to Kingston Road; thence northwesterly along a line to the intersection of Cedar Crescent Street with Kingston Road; thence northwesterly along said street to Queen-Mary Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Victoria Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to de Courtrai Avenue; thence northeasterly along said avenue to de la Côte-des-Neiges Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence northeasterly along said railway to the southwesterly limit of the City of Mont-Royal; thence southeasterly and northeasterly along the limit of said city and its northeasterly production to the northwesterly production of Hutchison Street; thence southeasterly along said production, said street and its southeasterly production to de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Mont-Royal Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to du Parc Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to des Pins Avenue West; thence southwesterly along said avenue to University Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Sherbrooke Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to McGill College Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to De Maisonneuve Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to the point of commencement.

Ozias-Leduc

(Population: 103,210)

(Map 6)

Reason: A native of Mont Saint-Hilaire, Ozias Leduc was one of Quebec’s most famous painters.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Rouville comprised of: the cities of Marieville and Richelieu; the Municipality of Saint-Mathias-sur-Richelieu; and

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-du-Richelieu comprised of:
    • (i) the cities of Chambly and Otterburn Park; the Municipality of Saint-Jean-Baptiste,

    • (ii) that part of the City of Carignan lying southerly and southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Cousineau Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to de Chambly Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the Acadie River; thence generally northeasterly along said river to the southeasterly limit of the City of Saint-Basile-le-Grand, and

    • (iii) those parts of the City of Beloeil, the City of Mont-Saint-Hilaire and the Municipality of Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil lying southerly and northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of the City of Mont-Saint-Hilaire with Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to Bernard-Pilon Street; thence generally southeasterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of the City of Beloeil.

Papineau

(Population: 97,246)

(Map 11)

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway) with the northwesterly production of Wiseman Avenue; thence northeasterly along said highway to the northwesterly production of Saint-Laurent Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said production and said boulevard to de Liège Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Foucher Street; thence southeasterly along said street to de Liège Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Christophe-Colomb Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to the northeasterly limit of the borough of Villeray—Saint-Michel—Parc-Extension; thence southeasterly along said limit to 24th Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to Bélanger Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Papineau Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Jean-Talon Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to Jean-Talon Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the intersection of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the limit of the borough of Villeray—Saint-Michel—Parc-Extension; thence generally southeasterly and southwesterly along the limit of said borough to the southeasterly production of Stuart Avenue; thence northwesterly along said production to Stuart Avenue; thence northwesterly and northeasterly along said avenue to Wiseman Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue and its northwesterly production to the point of commencement.

Paul-Comtois

(Population: 96,103)

(Map 3)

Reason: Born in Saint-Thomas-de-Pierreville, Paul Comtois was Member of Parliament for Nicolet—Yamaska, a federal government minister and later Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec. He died in the fire that destroyed the lieutenant-governor’s official residence in the Parc du Bois-de-Coulonge in 1966.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Pierre-De Saurel;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Nicolet-Yamaska, excepting that part of the municipalities of Sainte-Eulalie and Saint-Léonard-d’Aston lying southeasterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); including Odanak Indian Reserve No. 12;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Arthabaska consisting of: the City of Daveluyville; the Township Municipality of Maddington; that part of the municipalities of Sainte-Anne-du-Sault and Saint-Louis-de-Blandford lying northwesterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); and

    (d) the Regional County Municipality of Bécancour, excepting that part of the Municipality of Manseau lying southeasterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); including Wôlinak Indian Reserve No. 11.

Paul-Ragueneau

(Population: 103,053)

(Map 8)

Reason: The name of this electoral district recalls the fact that Île Jésus was granted to the Jesuits by the Company of One Hundred Associates. Paul Ragueneau was Superior of the Jesuits of Canada from 1650 to 1653.

Consisting of that part of the City of Laval lying southwesterly and southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of the City of Laval with the southeasterly production of 83rd Avenue; thence northwesterly along said production, 83rd Avenue and Curé-Labelle Boulevard to Saint-Martin Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 13 (Chomedey Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the City of Laval.

Paul-Sauvé

(Population: 108,129)

(Map 3)

Reason: A premier of Quebec, Paul Sauvé was born in Saint-Benoît, which became Sainte-Scholastique after the 1871 merger of eight municipalities in the Mirabel area. He died in Saint-Eustache in 1960.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Thérèse-De Blainville comprised of: the City of Boisbriand; that part of the City of Rosemère lying southwesterly of the Agence métropolitaine de transport railway; and

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Deux-Montagnes comprised of the cities of Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache and Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac.

Petite-Nation

(Population: 109,110)

(Map 7)

Reason: Petite-Nation was the name of the seigneury acquired by Joseph Papineau in 1803 and sold to his son, Louis-Joseph Papineau, in 1817.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Collines-de-l’Outaouais comprised of the municipalities of L’Ange-Gardien, Notre-Dame-de-la-Salette and Val-des-Monts; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Gatineau lying easterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with the generally southwesterly production of Montée Paiement; thence generally northeasterly along said production to Montée Paiement; thence northerly along Montée Paiement to Highway No. 50 (de l’Outaouais Highway); thence westerly and southerly along said highway to La Vérendrye Boulevard West; thence northwesterly and southwesterly along said boulevard to du Pont Avenue; thence southwesterly along said avenue to the northerly limit of said city; including Kettle Island.

Pierre-Legardeur

(Population: 107,918)

(Map 3)

Reason: Pierre Legardeur de Repentigny, Coseigneur of Repentigny, acquired the Seigneury of Lachenaye in 1715.

Consisting of that part of the Regional County Municipality of L’Assomption comprised of the cities of Charlemagne, L’Assomption and Repentigny.

Plateau—Mile End

(Population: 100,479)

(Map 11)

Reason: This electoral district includes the Plateau and Mile End districts of Montréal.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Plateau-Mont-Royal.

Québec

(Population: 97,571)

(Map 12)

Reason: This electoral district covers a large part of Québec’s Upper Town, including Old Québec.

Consisting of that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of the borough of La Cité-Limoilou with the St. Lawrence River; thence northwesterly along said limit to the mouth of the Saint-Charles River; thence westerly along said river to Jean-Lesage Boulevard; thence southerly along said boulevard to Saint-Paul Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Charest Boulevard East; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Charest Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to de l’Aqueduc Street; thence northwesterly from said street to Saint-Bernard Street; thence southwesterly from said street to Marie-de-l’Incarnation Street; thence northwesterly along said street to the Saint-Charles River; thence generally southwesterly from said river to Wilfrid-Hamel Boulevard; thence westerly along said boulevard to Highway No. 73 (Henri-IV Highway); thence generally southeasterly along said highway to Sainte-Foy Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Highway No. 540 (Duplessis Highway); thence southeasterly and easterly along said highway to Highway No. 73 (Henri-IV Highway); thence southerly along said highway to the southerly limit of said city; thence northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Richmond—Arthabaska

(Population: 101,573)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of Les Sources;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Val-Saint-François comprised of: the parish municipalities of Saint-Denis-de-Brompton and Saint-François-Xavier-de-Brompton; the township municipalities of Cleveland and Melbourne; the Village Municipality of Kingsbury; the municipalities of Saint-Claude, Ulverton and Val-Joli; the towns of Richmond and Windsor;

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Nicolet-Yamaska comprised of that part of the municipalities of Sainte-Eulalie and Saint-Léonard-d’Aston lying southeasterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway);

  • (d) the Regional County Municipality of Arthabaska, excepting: the City of Daveluyville; the Township Municipality of Maddington; that part of the municipalities of Sainte-Anne-du-Sault and Saint-Louis-de-Blandford lying northwesterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); and

  • (e) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Bécancour comprised of that part of the Municipality of Manseau lying southeasterly of Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway).

Rimouski

(Population: 112,450)

(Map 5)

Reason: This electoral district derives its name from its largest city.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Témiscouata comprised of: the Town of Dégelis; the municipalities of Auclair, Biencourt, Lac-des-Aigles, Lejeune and Saint-Juste-du-Lac; the Parish Municipality of Saint-Michel-du-Squatec;

  • (b) the regional county municipalities of Les Basques, Rimouski-Neigette and La Mitis;

  • (c) the Regional County Municipality of La Matapédia, excepting: the municipalities of Sainte-Marguerite-Marie and Saint-Vianney; the parish municipalities of Saint-Alexandre-des-Lacs, Saint-Tharcisius and Saint-Damase; the Village of Saint-Noël; the unorganized territories of Ruisseau-des-Mineurs and Lac-Casault; and

  • (d) the Regional County Municipality of Avignon, excepting: the unorganized territory of Rivière-Nouvelle; the municipalities of Maria and Nouvelle; the Town of Carleton-sur-Mer; Gesgapegiag Indian Reserve; including Listuguj Indian Reserve No. 1.

Rivière-des-Prairies

(Population: 99,623)

(Map 11)

Reason: The name of this electoral district derives from the fact that it borders the des Prairies River.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Rivière-des-Prairies—Pointe-aux-Trembles, excepting that part lying southeasterly of Henri-Bourassa Boulevard East and southwesterly of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Boulevard and its southeasterly production to the limit of said city.

Roger-Lemelin

(Population: 99,133)

(Map 12)

Reason: A best-selling novelist in Quebec, Roger Lemelin wrote the famous novel Les Plouffe. It was adapted for television under the title La Famille Plouffe (The Plouffe Family) and was broadcast live starting in 1953, becoming Quebec’s first hit television program.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Parish Municipality of Notre-Dame-des-Anges; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Québec described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of the borough of La Cité-Limoilou with the St. Lawrence River; thence northwesterly along said limit to the mouth of the Saint-Charles River; thence westerly from said river to Jean-Lesage Boulevard; thence southerly along said boulevard to Saint-Paul Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Charest Boulevard East; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Charest Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to de l’Aqueduc Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Saint-Bernard Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Marie-de-l’Incarnation Street; thence northwesterly along said street to the Saint-Charles River; thence generally southwesterly along said river to Wilfrid-Hamel Boulevard; thence westerly along said boulevard to Highway No. 73 (Henri-IV Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to its intersection with the southeasterly limit of the City of L’Ancienne-Lorette; thence northeasterly along the projection of said limit to Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to Saint-David Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to Royal Road; thence northeasterly and southeasterly along said road to de la Station Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue and du Cheminot Avenue to Sainte-Anne Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to the Beauport River; thence southerly along said river to its mouth; thence southeasterly along a line to the southeasterly limit of the City of Québec; thence southwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Sainte-Rose

(Population: 99,152)

(Map 8)

Reason: The name of this electoral district derives from the fact that the district covers most of the former city of Sainte-Rose.

Consisting of that part of the City of Laval described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the City of Laval with Papineau Avenue (Athanase-David Bridge); thence southeasterly along said avenue to Laurentides Boulevard; thence generally southwesterly and southeasterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 440 (Laval Highway); thence southwesterly along said highway to Curé-Labelle Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to Saint-Martin Boulevard West; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Highway No. 13 (Chomedey Highway); thence northwesterly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the City of Laval; thence generally northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot

(Population: 99,629)

(Map 3)

Consisting of the regional county municipalities of Acton and Les Maskoutains.

Saint-Jean

(Population: 106,913)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Haut-Richelieu comprised of: the City of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu; the Parish Municipality of Sainte-Anne-de-Sabrevois; the municipalities of Lacolle, Mont-Saint-Grégoire, Saint-Alexandre, Saint-Blaise-sur-Richelieu, Saint-Paul-de-l’Île-aux-Noix and Saint-Valentin.

Saint-Lambert

(Population: 103,567)

(Map 10)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Saint-Lambert; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Longueuil described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with the production of Châteauguay Street; thence southeasterly along said production and said street to Perrault Street; thence southwesterly along said street to Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Sainte-Foy Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Curé-Poirier Boulevard West; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to de Chambly Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Sir-Wilfrid-Laurier Boulevard; thence westerly along said boulevard to the Canadian National Railway; thence southeasterly along said railway to the production of the northwesterly limit of the borough of Greenfield Park; thence southwesterly along said production and said limit to Grande-Allée Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to Adam Street and its intersection with the southwesterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly along the limit of said city to the intersection of said city with the City of Saint-Lambert; thence generally westerly and northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of the City of Saint-Lambert to the intersection of said city with the City of Longueuil; thence generally northerly along the limit of the City of Longueuil to the point of commencement.

Saint-Léonard

(Population: 99,670)

(Map 11)

Reason: This electoral district is composed primarily of the City of Montréal borough of Saint-Léonard.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Saint-Léonard, excepting that part lying northwesterly of Highway No. 40 (Métropolitaine Highway) and southwesterly of Viau Boulevard and its northwesterly production to the northwesterly limit of said borough; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of the borough of Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, excepting that part lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said borough with Bourbonnière Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Rosemont Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to 19th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Bellechasse Street; thence northeasterly along said street to 20th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Beaubien Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to 19th Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to the northwesterly limit of the borough of Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

Sault-au-Récollet

(Population: 101,338)

(Map 8)

Reason: The name of this electoral district refers to the place where Father Nicolas Viel, a Recollect missionary, was murdered by Indians and his body thrown into the water. An Indian by the name of Ahuntsic, who witnessed the murder, suffered the same fate.

Consisting of that part of the City of Laval described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 19 (Papineau Highway) with Highway No. 440 (Laval Highway); thence southeasterly along Highway No. 19 (Papineau Highway) to the southeasterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly to the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said city with the southeasterly production of 83rd Avenue; thence northwesterly along said production, 83rd Avenue and Curé-Labelle Boulevard to Highway No. 440 (Laval Highway); thence northeasterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Shawinigane

(Population: 95,698)

(Map 15)

Reason: This name reflects the designation of the land traditionally occupied by Aboriginal peoples. The spelling “Shawinigane” was frequently used in 19th-century writings by Francophones such as Arthur Buies and Stanislas Drapeau to refer to the municipality of Shawinigan.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Shawinigan;

  • (b) the City of La Tuque;

  • (c) Communauté de Wemotaci Indian Reserve, Coucoucache Indian Reserve No. 24A and Obedjiwan Indian Reserve No. 28;

  • (d) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Portneuf comprised of the Municipality of Lac-Lapeyrère;

  • (e) the Regional County Municipality of Mékinac, excepting the parish municipalities of Saint-Adelphe and Saint-Séverin;

  • (f) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Les Chenaux comprised of: the parish municipalities of Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel and Saint-Narcisse; that part of the Parish Municipality of Champlain lying northwesterly of Highway No. 40 westbound (Félix-Leclerc Highway); that part of the Parish Municipality of Saint-Maurice lying northwesterly of Highway No. 40 westbound (Félix-Leclerc Highway); and

  • (g) that part of the City of Trois-Rivières lying northwesterly of Highway No. 40 (Félix-Leclerc Highway) and northeasterly of Thibeau Boulevard.

Shefford

(Population: 107,538)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Regional County Municipality of La Haute-Yamaska;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Rouville, excepting: the cities of Richelieu and Marieville; the Municipality of Saint-Mathias-sur-Richelieu; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Val-Saint-François comprised of: the City of Valcourt; the Village Municipality of Lawrenceville; the Township Municipality of Valcourt; the municipalities of Bonsecours, Maricourt, Racine and Sainte-Anne-de-la-Rochelle.

Sherbrooke

(Population: 107,312)

(Map 14)

Consisting of that part of the City of Sherbrooke comprised of:

  • (a) the boroughs of Jacques-Cartier and Mont-Bellevue;

  • (b) that part of the borough of Brompton lying southerly of Highway No. 610 (Louis-Bilodeau Highway); and

  • (c) that part of the borough of Fleurimont lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said borough with Highway No. 610 (Louis-Bilodeau Highway); thence generally southeasterly along said highway to its intersection with King Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to the easterly limit of said borough.

Soulanges

(Population: 105,149)

(Map 3)

Reason: This electoral district covers the southern part of what was formerly the electoral district of Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Vaudreuil-Soulanges comprised of: the City of Coteau-du-Lac; the Village Municipality of Pointe-des-Cascades; the municipalities of Les Cèdres, Les Coteaux, Rivière-Beaudette, Saint-Clet, Sainte-Justine-de-Newton, Sainte-Marthe, Saint-Polycarpe, Saint-Télesphore, Saint-Zotique and Très-Saint-Rédempteur;

  • (b) the Regional County Municipality of Beauharnois-Salaberry, excepting the municipalities of Sainte-Martine and Saint-Urbain-Premier; and

  • (c) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Le Haut-Saint-Laurent comprised of: the City of Huntingdon; the municipalities of Elgin, Ormstown, Sainte-Barbe and Hinchinbrooke; the township municipalities of Dundee and Godmanchester; the Parish Municipality of Saint-Anicet; including Akwesasne Indian Reserve No. 15.

Terrebonne

(Population: 106,322)

(Map 3)

Reason: This electoral district derives its name from the city of Terrebonne, which comprises it.

Consisting of the City of Terrebonne.

Trois-Rivières

(Population: 106,282)

(Map 15)

Consisting of that part of the City of Trois-Rivières lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Thibeau Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard to Duplessis Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Fusey Street; thence northeasterly along said street to Saint-Laurent Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Sainte-Madeleine Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to Notre-Dame Street East; thence southeasterly in the St. Lawrence River to a point at latitude 46°22′05″N and longitude 72°28′50″W.

Urbain-Brossard

(Population: 102,245)

(Map 10)

Reason: A master mason who arrived in Ville-Marie in 1653, Urbain Brossard constructed many buildings in the Montréal area.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Brossard; and

  • (b) that part of the City of Longueuil lying southwesterly and southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of the City of Brossard with Grande-Allée Boulevard; thence northwesterly along said boulevard to its intersection with the northwesterly limit of the borough of Greenfield Park; thence northeasterly and southeasterly along said limit to the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said borough with the northwesterly production of Maricourt Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said production to Maricourt Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard and its production to the southeasterly limit of said city.

Vaudreuil

(Population: 104,486)

(Map 3)

Reason: This electoral district covers the northern part of what was formerly the electoral district of Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Consisting of that part of the Regional County Municipality of Vaudreuil-Soulanges comprised of: the cities of Hudson, L’Île-Cadieux, L’Île-Perrot, Notre-Dame-de-l’Île-Perrot, Pincourt, Saint-Lazare and Vaudreuil-Dorion; the municipalities of Rigaud and Terrasse-Vaudreuil; the village municipalities of Vaudreuil-sur-le-Lac and Pointe-Fortune.

Verchères—Les Patriotes

(Population: 98,401)

(Map 10)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-du-Richelieu lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of the City of Mont-Saint-Hilaire with the limit of the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-du-Richelieu; thence northwesterly along the limit of said city to the intersection of the easterly limit of the City of Mont-Saint-Hilaire with Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to the northwesterly limit of the Municipality of Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil;

  • (b) that part of the Regional County Municipality of Marguerite-D’Youville lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of the City of Sainte-Julie with Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to the westerly limit of said city; and

  • (c) that part of the City of Boucherville lying northeasterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Highway No. 20 (Jean-Lesage Highway); thence westerly along said highway to De Montarville Boulevard; thence generally northwesterly along said boulevard and its northwesterly production to the St. Lawrence River; thence generally northerly to the northwesterly limit of said city; excluding the Boucherville Islands.

Verdun

(Population: 99,738)

(Map 11)

Reason: This electoral district is composed primarily of the City of Montréal borough of Verdun.

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Verdun lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the west shore of the St. Lawrence River (west of Île des Sœurs) with the southwesterly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest; thence generally southerly along said shore to the easterly production of de l’Église Street; thence westerly along said production to Gaétan-Laberge Boulevard; thence northeasterly and northerly along said boulevard to Hickson Street; thence westerly along said street to Bannantyne Street; thence northerly along said street to the southerly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest;

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of LaSalle lying easterly, northeasterly and southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said borough with the abandoned Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southwesterly along said abandoned railway to Shevchenko Boulevard; thence southeasterly along said boulevard, Bishop-Power Boulevard and its production to the St. Lawrence River (Lachine Rapids); thence southwesterly and then southerly along a line parallel to the north shore of said river to the limit of said borough; including Île aux Chèvres Island, Île aux Hérons Island, Île au Diable Island, Île Rock Island and Les Sept Sœurs Islets; and

  • (c) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the production of Irwin Street and the central part of the Lachine Canal; thence northeasterly along said canal to its intersection with Highway No. 15 (Décarie Highway); thence generally easterly along said highway to the westerly limit of the borough of Verdun.

Ville-Marie

(Population: 97,260)

(Map 11)

Reason: This electoral district primarily covers the City of Montréal borough of Ville-Marie.

Consisting of that part of the City of Montréal described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 720 (Ville-Marie Highway) with Highway No. 15 (Décarie Highway); thence generally northeasterly along Highway No. 720 (Ville-Marie Highway) to the southeasterly limit of the City of Westmount; thence generally northeasterly and northwesterly along the southeasterly and northeasterly limits of the City of Westmount to De Maisonneuve Boulevard West; thence northeasterly along said boulevard to McGill College Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Sherbrooke Street West; thence northeasterly along said street and Sherbrooke Street East to Dorion Street; thence southeasterly along said street and the Jacques-Cartier Bridge to the St. Lawrence River (west of Sainte-Hélène Island); thence generally northeasterly along said river (skirting westerly and northerly around said island) to the intersection of the easterly limit of the City of Montréal with the northerly limit of the borough of Ville-Marie; thence generally southerly along said limit to the southerly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest; thence southwesterly and northwesterly along said limit to the west shore of the St. Lawrence River (west of Île des Sœurs); thence generally southerly along said shore to the easterly production of de l’Église Street; thence westerly along said production to Gaétan-Laberge Boulevard; thence northeasterly and northerly along said boulevard to Hickson Street; thence westerly along said street to Bannantyne Street; thence northerly along said street to the southerly limit of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest; thence generally westerly along said limit to Highway No. 15; thence westerly and northwesterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Wilder-Penfield

(Population: 99,635)

(Map 11)

Reason: A Montréal neurosurgeon who died in 1976, Dr. Wilder Penfield became famous for developing a medical treatment for epilepsy and for making discoveries related to the biology of memory.

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Westmount;

  • (b) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-de-Grâce lying southeasterly of de la Côte-Saint-Luc Road;

  • (c) that part of the City of Montréal comprised of that part of the borough of Le Sud-Ouest lying northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said borough with Highway No. 720 (Ville-Marie Highway); thence southwesterly along said highway to Highway No. 15 (Décarie Highway); thence southeasterly along said highway to the Lachine Canal; thence southwesterly along said canal to the limit of said borough;

  • (d) the City of Montréal-Ouest;

  • (e) that part of the City of Montréal consisting of that part of the borough of Lachine lying easterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of the City of Montréal-Ouest with Highway No. 20; thence southwesterly along said highway to the Canadian National Railway; thence northerly along said railway to the southwesterly limit of said city; and

  • (f) that part of the City of Côte-Saint-Luc lying southeasterly of Côte-Saint-Luc Road.