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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 16773

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance alkanediol, reaction products with phosphorus oxide (P2O5), polyfluoro-1-alkanol, -ammonium salts under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance alkanediol, reaction products with phosphorus oxide (P2O5), polyfluoro-1-alkanol, -ammonium salts, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in Canada, in any quantity,
    • (a) in aerosol or spray-applied household products other than paints and coatings applied by spray; or

    • (b) in any other household products at a concentration of more than 1% by weight, other than in paints, coatings, floor waxes and floor finishes.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister, at least 90 days before the commencement of each proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the proposed significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the information specified in Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (c) the information specified in items 8 and 10 of Schedule 5 to those Regulations;

    • (d) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (e) the identification of the other government agencies, either outside or within Canada, that the person has notified of the proposed significant new activity in relation to the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and the risk management actions imposed by those agencies;

    • (f) if known, the three sites in Canada where the greatest quantity of the substance, in relation to the significant new activity, is anticipated to be used or processed and the estimated quantity by site;

    • (g) for a new activity described in paragraph 1(a):
      • (i) the identification of the equipment that may be used or that is recommended by the product manufacturer to apply the product, such as a low pressure hand-held pump spray, an aerosolizing applicator with propellant, or a pneumatic sprayer using a compressor,

      • (ii) the information describing the equipment and its operation, including its normal operating pressure,

      • (iii) the information describing the size and shape of the nozzle of the equipment which controls the spread of the jet,

      • (iv) the information regarding the particle size distribution of the applied spray produced by the equipment characterized by mean mass median aerodynamic diameter, and

      • (v) any information regarding safety labelling for the product containing the substance, such as recommended ventilation and personal protective equipment for users;
  3. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the
Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 16877

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 389623-07-8, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped, a significant new activity is any use where the substance is engineered to contain particles of particle size ranging from 1 to 100 nanometres in one or more dimensions, in a quantity that exceeds 10 kg per calendar year.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of each proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the information specified in Schedule 5 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (c) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (d) if known, the three sites in Canada where the greatest quantity of the substance, in relation to the significant new activity, is anticipated to be used or processed and the estimated quantity by site;

    • (e) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the substance;

    • (f) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the substance;

    • (g) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (h) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (i) the analytical information to determine the leachability potential of the substance and its precursors from any final product resulting from the new activity;

    • (j) the test data and a test report on the water solubility of the substance involved in the significant new activity conducted in accordance with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Series on Testing and Assessment, Number 29, Guidance Document on Transformation/Dissolution of Metals and Metal Compounds in Aqueous Media, that is current at the time the test is developed;

    • (k) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the use of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and, if any, the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the agency; and

      (l) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  3. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the
Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 16878

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance rutile, tin zinc, calcium-doped, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 389623-01-2, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance rutile, tin zinc, calcium-doped, a significant new activity is any use where the substance is engineered to contain particles of particle size ranging from 1 to 100 nanometres in one or more dimensions, in a quantity that exceeds 10 kg per calendar year.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of each proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the information specified in Schedule 5 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (c) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (d) if known, the three sites in Canada where the greatest quantity of the substance, in relation to the significant new activity, is anticipated to be used or processed and the estimated quantity by site;

    • (e) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the substance;

    • (f) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the substance;

    • (g) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (h) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (i) the analytical information to determine the leachability potential of the substance and its precursors from any final product resulting from the new activity;

    • (j) the test data and a test report on the water solubility of the substance involved in the significant new activity conducted in accordance with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Series on Testing and Assessment, Number 29, Guidance Document on Transformation/Dissolution of Metals and Metal Compounds in Aqueous Media, that is current at the time the test is developed;

    • (k) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the use of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and, if any, the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the agency; and

    • (l) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  3. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the
Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 16879

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance rutile, tin zinc, potassium-doped, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 207691-99-4, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance rutile, tin zinc, potassium-doped, a significant new activity is any use where the substance is engineered to contain particles of particle size ranging from 1 to 100 nanometres in one or more dimensions, in a quantity that exceeds 10 kg per calendar year.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of each proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the information specified in Schedule 5 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (c) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (d) if known, the three sites in Canada where the greatest quantity of the substance, in relation to the significant new activity, is anticipated to be used or processed and the estimated quantity by site;

    • (e) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the substance;

    • (f) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the substance;

    • (g) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (h) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under paragraph (b);

    • (i) the analytical information to determine the leachability potential of the substance and its precursors from any final product resulting from the new activity;

    • (j) the test data and a test report on the water solubility of the substance involved in the significant new activity conducted in accordance with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Series on Testing and Assessment, Number 29, Guidance Document on Transformation/Dissolution of Metals and Metal Compounds in Aqueous Media, that is current at the time the test is developed;

    • (k) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the use of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and, if any, the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the agency; and

    • (l) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  3. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the
Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) and subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Government of Canada published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, on June 17, 2006, a Notice of Action Plan for the Assessment and Management of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and their Precursors, a key element of which is to pursue further assessment of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and precursor substances already in Canadian commerce in order to guide further risk management actions, as needed;

Whereas the 14 PFCA precursors set out in Annex 1 to this Notice are substances on the Domestic Substances List that were identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the ecological Screening Assessment of long-chain PFCAs that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors, conducted pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, is annexed hereby;

Whereas a human health Screening Assessment will be conducted on long-chain PFCAs that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors, at a later date; and

Whereas it is concluded that long-chain PFCAs that contain from 9 to 20 carbon atoms, their salts and their precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that perfluorocarboxylic acids that have the molecular formula CnF2n+1CO2H in which 8≤n≤20 and their salts be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is hereby also given that Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that compounds that consist of a perfluorinated alkyl group that has the molecular formula CnF2n+1 in which 8≤n≤20 and that is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health are releasing a proposed risk management approach document for the substances on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca) to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the Ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substances.

Public comment period on the proposed risk management approach document

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment
LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

Precursors to Long-chain PFCAs Identified Under Subsection 73(1)
of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS Registry Number(see footnote 1)

Substance DSL(see footnote 2) name

678-39-7

1-Decanol, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluoro-

65530-63-4

Ethanol, 2,2′ -iminobis-, compd. with α-fluoro-ω[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene) (2:1)

65530-66-7

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]-

65530-71-4

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-, monoammonium salt

65530-72-5

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-, diammonium salt

65530-74-7

Ethanol, 2,2′-iminobis-, compd. with α-fluoro-ω[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene) (1:1)

65605-58-5

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, dodecyl ester, polymer with α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene)

65605-70-1

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]-

65636-35-3

Ethanaminium, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo2-propenyl)oxy]-, methyl sulfate, polymer with 2-ethylhexyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene), 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and N-(hydroxymethyl)-2-propenamide

68239-43-0

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-ethylhexyl ester, polymer with α-fluoro-ω-[2-[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl)oxy]ethyl]poly(difluoromethylene), 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and N-(hydroxymethyl)-2-propenamide

68391-08-2

Alcohols, C8-14, γ-ω-perfluoro

68412-68-0

Phosphonic acid, perfluoro-C6-12-alkyl derivs.

110053-43-5

Imidodicarbonic diamide, N,N′,2-tris(6-isocyanatohexyl)-, reaction products with 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol and α-fluoro-ω-(2-hydroxyethyl)poly(difluoromethylene)

115592-83-1

2-Propenoic acid, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,12-heneicosafluorododecyl ester, polymer with 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluorodecyl 2-propenoate, hexadecyl 2-propenoate, N-(hydroxymethyl)2-propenamide, octadecyl 2-propenoate, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,13,13,14,14,14-pentacosafluorotetradecyl 2-propenoate and 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluorooctyl 2-propenoate

ANNEX 2

Summary of the Ecological Screening Assessment Report
on Long-chain Perfluorocarboxylic Acids (PFCAs)
That Contain From 9 to 20 Carbon Atoms,
Their Salts and Their Precursors

Under sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act,1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health conducted an ecological screening assessment of long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), their salts and their precursors. In this assessment, the long-chain (C9-C20) perfluorocarboxylic acids will be referred to as long-chain PFCAs. Although the long-chain PFCAs themselves are not on Canada’s Domestic Substances List (DSL), some precursors to long-chain PFCAs, which are present on the DSL, were categorized under section 73 of CEPA 1999. Assessment was undertaken in response to empirical evidence that demonstrated that some PFCAs are bioaccumulative, persistent, subject to long-range transport (via precursors), widespread and showing a trend toward increasing concentrations in Arctic wildlife.

This ecological assessment focuses on the PFCAs with carbon chain lengths from 9 to 20, inclusive, their salts and their precursors. Precursors, i.e. substances that could transform or degrade to long-chain PFCAs, were considered on the basis of their contribution to the total presence of long-chain PFCAs in the environment. This assessment defines precursors as any substance where the perfluorinated alkyl moiety has the formula CnF2n+1 (where 8≤n≤20) and is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom.

The presence of long-chain PFCAs, their salts and their precursors results from anthropogenic activity. In 2000 and 2004, industry surveys by Environment Canada under the authority of section 71 of CEPA 1999 found that long-chain PFCAs were not reported to be manufactured or imported into Canada. However, in both surveys, several precursors to the long-chain PFCAs were reported to be imported into Canada.

In standard toxicity studies with aquatic organisms, long-chain PFCAs were of low to moderate toxicity, with acute toxicity values ranging from 8.8 to 285 mg/L. There are two studies on the toxicity of long-chain PFCAs in terrestrial species. In one study, no adverse effects were observed up to 1.0 mg/kg body weight for male chickens dosed three times per week for three weeks with a C10 PFCA. In another study, exposure of C9 PFCA to a soil-dwelling nematode resulted in acute lethality at 306 mg/L and multi-generation effects (decreased fecundity) at 0.000464 mg/L.

There are other studies showing the potential for long-chain PFCAs to cause other types of effects. C9 and C10 PFCAs have been shown to affect the multi-xenobiotic resistance mechanism in marine mussels at concentrations ranging from 2.23 to 3.65 mg/L. C9 to C12 PFCAs induced vitellogenesis in rainbow trout exposed for 14 days at 2.56 × 10-5 to 2 mg/g diet. C9 PFCA may cause oxidative stress in the common cormorant. C9 to C11 PFCAs activated the mammalian peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα) in the livers of Baikal seals; PPARα plays a critical physiological role as a lipid sensor and a regulator of lipid metabolism. C9 to C10 PFCAs are also chemical sensitizers for the marine mussel Mytilus californianus, allowing normally excluded toxic substances to accumulate in the marine mussel. C12 and C14 PFCAs increased the mitochondrial membrane potential in the freshwater alga Scenedesmus obliquus, indicating damage to the mitochondrial function.

There are no experimental persistence data, under environmentally relevant conditions, available for the long-chain PFCAs. However, the carbon-fluorine bond is one of the strongest in nature, making the structure extremely stable and resistant to degradation. The perfluorinated chain provides exceptional resistance to thermal and chemical attack. Thus, due to the strength of the carbon-fluorine bond, it is expected that long-chain PFCAs would be persistent. Furthermore, long-chain PFCAs have been detected in remote areas (e.g. the Canadian Arctic). While mechanisms of transport are not fully understood, certain precursors may undergo long-range transport to remote areas, where subsequent degradation can result in the formation of long-chain PFCAs.

Empirical bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of >5 000 have been reported for C11, C12 and C14 PFCAs. Furthermore, empirical food-web data also indicate that there is a significant potential for biomagnification and/or trophic magnification in both water-breathing and air-breathing organisms for C9 to C14 PFCAs. There are no experimental or predicted bioaccumulation data available for long-chain PFCAs greater than C14; nevertheless, there is the potential that these longer chains could bioaccumulate or biomagnify in marine and/or terrestrial species based on chemical conformations. However, the numeric criteria for bioaccumulation, outlined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations, are based on bioaccumulation data for freshwater aquatic species (fish) only, and for substances that preferentially partition to lipids. As a result, the criteria may not completely reflect the bioaccumulation potential for the long-chain PFCAs that preferentially partition to the liver, blood and kidneys in terrestrial and marine mammals. Therefore, most long-chain PFCAs, their salts and their precursors do not meet the numeric criteria for bioaccumulation as outlined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

C9 to C15 PFCAs were measured in the liver of seals, foxes, fish, polar bears, Greenland sharks, narwhals, beluga whales and birds either in the Canadian Arctic or the Great Lakes region. Concentrations ranged from below detection levels to 180 ng/g liver wet weight, with concentrations greatest for polar bears, followed by Greenland sharks, narwhals and beluga whales. Worldwide, C9 to C15 PFCAs have been reported in ringed, fur and harbour seals, dolphins (i.e. white-sided, bottlenose, white-beaked, humpback), finless porpoises, glaucous gulls, sperm whales, beavers, tigers, wild rats and several species of birds. Concentrations ranged from below detection levels to 480 ng/g wet weight, with concentrations highest in the white-beaked dolphin.

From 1980 to 2000, levels of long-chain PFCAs in ringed seal livers from Greenland increased 3.3% and 6.8% per year for C10 and C11 PFCAs, respectively. From 1992 to 2005, the mean concentrations of C9 and C10 PFCAs in the livers of Baikal seals were 1.2 to 1.7 times higher. From 1972 to 2002, mean doubling times for concentrations in the livers of Arctic polar bears ranged from 5.8 to 9.1 years for C9 to C11 PFCAs. From 1993 to 2004, concentrations in the liver samples of ringed seal increased, with a doubling time of 4 to 10 years for C9 to C12 PFCAs. In liver samples of northern fulmar, C9 to C15 PFCA levels increased from 1987 to 1993 and remained steady from 1993 to 2003. Thick-billed murre liver samples showed an increase in C9 to C15 PFCA concentrations from 1975 to 2004. Concentrations of C9 to C13 PFCAs increased significantly in whole eggs of herring gulls in Norway from 1983 to 1993. Male beluga whales from Nunavut showed an annual liver increase of 1.8 ng/g-ww for C9 to C12 PFCAs from 1980 to 2010.

The assessment is based on a weight-of-evidence approach regarding persistence, bioaccumulation, the widespread occurrence, temporal trends in some species (i.e. Canadian Arctic birds, terrestrial and marine mammals), long-range transport and concentrations of long-chain PFCAs in the environment and biota (including remote areas of Canada).

Based on the available information, it is concluded that long-chain PFCAs, their salts and their precursors are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. In addition, it is concluded that long-chain PFCAs and their salts are extremely persistent and meet the criteria for persistence as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Long-chain PFCAs do not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Nevertheless, the weight of evidence is sufficient to conclude that long-chain PFCAs and their salts accumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals.

Conclusion

It is concluded that long-chain PFCAs, their salts and their precursors meet one or more of the criteria in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report as well as the proposed risk management approach document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), its salts and its precursors (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) and subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Government of Canada published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, on June 17, 2006, the Notice of Action Plan for the Assessment and Management of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and their Precursors, a key element of which is to pursue further assessment of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and precursor substances already in Canadian commerce in order to guide further risk management actions, as needed;

Whereas the Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) salt and four PFOA precursors identified in Annex 1 to this Notice are substances on the Domestic Substances List that were identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on PFOA, its salts and its precursors pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby; and

Whereas it is concluded that PFOA, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that Perfluorooctanoic acid, which has the molecular formula C7F15CO2H, and its salts be added to Schedule 1 to the Act, and

Notice is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that compounds that consist of a perfluorinated alkyl group that has the molecular formula CnF2n+1 in which n = 7 or 8 and that is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health are releasing a proposed risk management approach document for these substances on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca) to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the Ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substances.

Public comment period on the proposed risk management approach document

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

PFOA Salt and Precursors Identified Under Subsection 73(1)
of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS Registry Number (see footnote 3)

Substance DSL (see footnote 4) name

PFOA salt

3825-26-1

Octanoic acid, pentadecafluoro-, ammonium salt

PFOA precursors

678-39-7

1-Decanol, 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluoro

53515-73-4

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-pentadecafluorooctyl ester, polymer with 2-propenoic acid

65530-61-2

Poly(difluoromethylene), α-fluoro-ω-[2-(phosphonooxy)ethyl]-

70969-47-0

Thiols, C8-20, γ-ω-perfluoro, telomers with acrylamide

ANNEX 2

Summary of the Screening Assessment of Perfluorooctanoic
Acid (PFOA), its Salts and its Precursors

Under sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 335-67-1, its salts and its precursors. The ammonium salt of PFOA and some precursors to PFOA, present on Canada’s Domestic Substances List (DSL), were categorized under section 73 of CEPA 1999. While PFOA itself is not on the DSL, PFOA can be formed in the environment through transformation or degradation from a variety of other perfluorinated chemicals. PFOA was identified for assessment based on its persistent nature, widespread occurrence in biota, presence in the Canadian Arctic due to long-range transport, and international interest in emerging science indicating a potential concern for the environment and human health from PFOA and its salts. In addition, precursors to PFOA were considered in this assessment on the basis of their contribution to the total presence of PFOA and its salts in the environment.

The substance PFOA is an anthropogenic substance belonging to a class of chemicals known as perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFCAs, in turn, belong to the broader class of chemicals known as perfluoroalkyls (PFAs). In this assessment, the term “PFOA” may refer to the acid, its conjugate base or its principal salt forms. Historical uses of PFOA include applications in industrial processes and in commercial and consumer products. PFOA and its salts are used as polymerization aids in the production of fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. PFOA itself is not manufactured in Canada; however, quantities of the ammonium salt are imported.

Environment

The substance PFOA may be found in the environment due to releases from fluoropolymer manufacturing or processing facilities, effluent releases from wastewater treatment plants, landfill leachates and degradation or transformation of PFOA precursors. This assessment defines precursors as substances where the perfluorinated alkyl moiety has the formula CnF2n+1 (where n = 7 or 8) and is directly bonded to any chemical moiety other than a fluorine, chlorine or bromine atom. Such precursors may include parent compounds, chemical products containing PFOA (either as part of formulations or as unintended residuals) and substances transforming to intermediates that ultimately degrade to PFOA. Potential precursors also include related fluorochemicals (e.g. fluorotelomer alcohols [FTOHs], fluorotelomer iodides and fluorotelomer olefins), some of which are currently found in commercial products, are detectable in the atmosphere and can degrade or transform to PFOA through biotic or abiotic pathways.

Once in the environment, PFOA is extremely persistent and not known to undergo significant further abiotic or biotic degradation under relevant environmental conditions. PFOA is highly soluble in water and typically present as an anion (conjugate base) in solution. PFOA has low vapour pressure; therefore, the aquatic environment is expected to be its primary sink, with some additional partitioning to sediment. The presence of PFOA in the Canadian Arctic is likely attributable to the long-range transport of PFOA (e.g. via ocean currents) and/or of volatile precursors to PFOA (e.g. via atmospheric transport).

The substance PFOA has been detected at trace levels in the northern hemisphere. In North America, higher levels were measured in surface waters in the vicinity of U.S. fluoropolymer manufacturing facilities (<0.025–1 900 µg/L) and in groundwater near U.S. military bases (not detected [ND] to 6 570 µg/L). PFOA was detected in effluent from Canadian wastewater treatment facilities at concentrations ranging from 0.007 to 0.055 µg/L. PFOA was also detected in the influent at U.S. wastewater treatment facilities at concentrations ranging from 0.0074–0.089 µg/L.

Trace levels of PFOA have been measured in Canadian freshwater (ND–11.3 µg/L) and freshwater sediments (0.3–7.5 µg/kg). PFOA has also been detected in a variety of Canadian biota (ND–90 µg/kg wet weight [kg-ww] tissue) in southern Ontario and the Canadian Arctic. The highest concentration of PFOA in Canadian organisms was found in the benthic invertebrate Diporeia hoyi at 90 µg/kg-ww, followed by turbot liver at 26.5 µg/kg-ww, polar bear liver at 13 µg/kg-ww, caribou liver at 12.2 µg/kg-ww, ringed seal liver at 8.7 µg/kg-ww and walrus liver at 5.8 µg/kg-ww. Following an accidental release of fire-fighting foam in Etobicoke Creek (Ontario), PFOA was measured in common shiner liver at a maximum concentration of 91 µg/kg-ww. However, current PFOA concentrations in Canadian biota (tissue specific and whole body) are below the highest concentration found in U.S. biota (up to 1 934.5 µg/kg-ww in gar liver).

Temporal or spatial trends in PFOA concentrations in guillemot eggs, lake trout, thick-billed murres, northern fulmars or ringed seals could not be determined. However, temporal trends were found for PFOA concentrations in polar bears (1972–2002 and 1984–2006) and sea otters (1992–2002). PFOA doubling time in liver tissue was calculated to be 7.3 ± 2.8 years in the polar bears of Baffin Island and 13.9 ± 14.2 years in the polar bears of Barrow, Alaska. The polar bears of central East Greenland showed an annual increase of 2.3% in PFOA concentrations. Concentrations of PFOA also increased significantly over a 10-year period for adult female sea otters.

Unlike other organic pollutants that are persistent and found in biota, PFOA is present mainly in its ionic form in environmental media. Due to the perfluorination, the perfluorinated chains are both oleophobic and hydrophobic. PFOA primarily binds to albumin proteins in the blood of biota and, as a result, is present in blood and highly perfused tissues such as liver and kidney, rather than lipid tissue. The numeric criteria for bioaccumulation, outlined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999, are based on bioaccumulation data for freshwater aquatic species (fish) only and for substances that preferentially partition to lipids. As a result, the criteria may not completely reflect the bioaccumulation potential of PFOA that is preferentially partitioning in the proteins of liver, blood and kidney in terrestrial and marine mammals. There is experimental evidence indicating that PFOA is not highly bioaccumulative in fish. Reported laboratory bioconcentration factors for fish species (primarily rainbow trout) ranged from 3.1–27. In the pelagic aquatic food web of Lake Ontario, two studies indicate that PFOA concentrations do not biomagnify with increasing trophic levels. However, these results should not be extrapolated to non-aquatic species, since gills provide an additional mode of elimination for PFOA that air-breathing organisms, such as terrestrial and marine mammals, do not possess. Field studies indicating biomagnification factors greater than 1 for Arctic and other mammals (such as narwhal, beluga, polar bear, walrus, bottlenose dolphins, and harbour seals) suggest that PFOA may bioaccumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals. Reported field biomagnification factors for terrestrial and marine mammals ranged from 0.03–31. Polar bears, as the apex predator in the Arctic marine food web, have been shown to be the most contaminated with PFOA relative to other Arctic terrestrial organisms.

In traditional toxicity studies, PFOA exhibits moderate to low acute toxicities in pelagic organisms, including fish (70– 2 470 mg/L). PFOA exhibits low chronic toxicities in benthic organisms (>100 mg/L). There is one study on the toxicity of PFOA and its salts in avian wildlife. In this study, PFOA was found to have no effect on embryonic pipping success for White Leghorn chickens at concentrations up to 10 µg/g of embryos. However, PFOA accumulated in the liver of these embryos to concentrations 2.9–4.5 times greater than the initial whole-egg concentration.

There are studies showing the potential for PFOA to affect endocrine function where visible effects may not be apparent until the organisms reach adulthood. In female and male rare minnows, 3–30 mg/L PFOA elicited inhibition of the thyroid hormone biosynthesis genes, induced vitellogenin expression in males, developed oocytes in the testes of male fish and caused ovary degeneration in females.

There are other studies showing hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and chemosensitivity. For example, a PFOA concentration of 20 mg/L increased the chemosensitivity in marine mussels. PFOA at 25.9 mg/L activated the mammalian peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα) in the livers of Baikal seals — PPARα plays a critical physiological role as a lipid sensor and a regulator of lipid metabolism. Field data also reveal that there may be increases in indicators of inflammation and immunity in bottlenose dolphins related to PFOA concentrations, suggesting possible autoimmune effects. Another field study has also suggested that low levels of PFOA may alter biomarkers of health in loggerhead sea turtles. In two-year carcinogenicity bioassays in rats, males that were administered a high dose of PFOA ammonium salt (APFO) in their diet had significantly higher incidences of adenomas of the liver hepatocytes, Leydig cells in the testes and pancreatic acinar cells. Liver tumours in male rats may be induced via liver toxicity resulting from PFOA-induced peroxisome proliferation, and additional pathways secondary to peroxisome proliferation may be involved in the generation of tumours at other sites. There is some evidence to suggest that PFOA may be capable of causing indirect oxidative DNA damage.

Human health

In humans, PFOA is well absorbed by all routes of exposure; it has not been demonstrated to be metabolized and has a relatively long half-life. Salts of PFOA are expected to dissociate in biological media to produce the perfluorooctanoate (PFO) moiety, and are therefore considered toxicologically equivalent to PFOA. Low concentrations of PFOA have been identified in blood samples from non-occupationally exposed Canadians, including newborns, indicating environmental exposure to PFOA and/or compounds that can degrade to PFOA. The available data indicate that Canadians are exposed to PFOA and its precursors in the environment, including via air, drinking water and food; and from the use of consumer products, such as new non-stick cookware and perfluorinated compound (PFC)-treated apparel and household materials such as carpets and upholstery. Canadians are also potentially exposed to PFOA in utero and through lactational transfer. The relative contributions of PFOA and its salts and precursors to total PFOA exposure were not characterized; rather, the focus was on aggregate exposure to the moiety of toxicological concern, PFOA.

Epidemiological studies have not identified a causal relationship between PFOA exposure and adverse health effects in humans. Toxicity studies in laboratory animals were used to determine the critical effects and associated serum levels of PFOA. Following oral dosing of PFOA ammonium salt (APFO), increased liver weight in mice and altered lipid parameters in rats were observed in short-term (14-day) toxicity studies; increased liver weight was noted in a 26-week toxicity study in monkeys; and increased liver weight in dams, alterations in fetal ossification and early puberty in male pups were found in a developmental toxicity study in mice.

In two-year carcinogenicity bioassays in rats, males that were administered a high dose of APFO in their diet had significantly higher incidences of adenomas of the liver hepatocytes, Leydig cells in the testes and pancreatic acinar cells. No evidence of carcinogenic activity was seen in the female rats. Liver tumours in male rats may be induced via liver toxicity resulting from PFOA-induced peroxisome proliferation, and additional pathways secondary to peroxisome proliferation may be involved in the generation of tumours at other sites. As primates are much less susceptible than rodents to peroxisome proliferation, the PFOA-induced tumours in male rats are considered to have little or no relevance for humans. Although blood levels of PFOA were not determined in the chronic studies, the oral dose of APFO was several times higher than those in the critical short-term and subchronic studies. Although there is some evidence to suggest that PFOA may be capable of causing indirect oxidative DNA damage, the genotoxicity database indicates that PFOA is not mutagenic. Thus, as the tumours observed in male rats are not considered to have resulted from direct interaction with genetic material, a threshold approach is used to assess risk to human health.

The assessment of PFOA is based on a comparison of the margin between the levels of PFOA in the blood (serum or plasma) of humans and serum levels that are associated with the development of adverse effects in laboratory animals. This approach aggregates exposure to PFOA from all sources, including those resulting from releases from fluoropolymer manufacturing or processing facilities, effluent releases from sewage treatment plants, landfill effluents, or degradation/transformation of PFOA precursors.

Comparison of the PFOA serum levels associated with adverse effects in laboratory animals (13–77 µg/mL) with the serum or plasma levels found in non-occupationally exposed adults, infants, and children (0.00162–0.0195 µg/mL) results in margins of exposure greater than 660. These margins are considered to be adequately protective to account for uncertainties in the hazard and exposure databases.

The ecological assessment is based on a weight-of-evidence approach regarding persistence, bioaccumulation, temporal trends in some species (e.g. the polar bear), long-range transport and the widespread occurrence and concentrations of PFOA in the environment and biota (including remote areas of Canada). Based on the available information, it is concluded that PFOA, its salts and its precursors are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. In addition, it is concluded that PFOA and its salts meet the criteria for persistence as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. PFOA and its salts do not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Nevertheless, the weight of evidence is sufficient to conclude that PFOA and its salts accumulate and biomagnify in terrestrial and marine mammals.

Based on the available information on the potential to cause harm to human health and the resulting margins of exposure, it is concluded that PFOA and its salts are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health. Precursors of PFOA were not individually assessed, but were considered in terms of their contribution to total PFOA exposure because they can degrade to PFOA in the environment.

Conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is concluded that PFOA, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report as well as the proposed risk management approach document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

CANADA—COLOMBIA TAX CONVENTION ACT, 2010

Coming into force of a tax treaty

Notice is hereby given that the Tax Convention between Canada and the Republic of Colombia and its Protocol, which were signed on November 21, 2008, and are set out, respectively, in Schedules 1 and 2 to the Canada—Colombia Tax Convention Act, 2010, entered into force on June 12, 2012.

JAMES M. FLAHERTY
Minister of Finance

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

(see footnote *)Chaput, Mary

2012-978

Deputy Minister of Veterans Affairs

 

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

2012-1011

Administrators

 

Wells, The Hon. Clyde K.

 

July 31 to August 2, 2012

 

Welsh, The Hon. B. Gail

 

August 3, 2012

 

Saunders, The Hon. Jamie W. S.

2012-1004

Government of Nova Scotia

 

Administrator

 

July 27, 2012

 

Sled, Joanne

2012-1013

Government of Canada

 

Commissioner to administer oaths

 

August 17, 2012

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-007-12 — Consultation on a policy, technical and licensing framework for use of the Public Safety Broadband spectrum in the bands 758-763 MHz and 788-793 MHz (D block) and 763-768 MHz and 793-798 MHz (PSBB block)

The purpose of this notice is to announce a public consultation on the designation of use for the 758-763 MHz and 788-793 MHz bands (700 MHz band upper D block, hereinafter referred to as the D block). It is proposed that the D block be designated for public safety broadband use.

Industry Canada is also consulting on some preliminary technical and licensing issues for the bands 763-768 MHz and 793-798 MHz (Public Safety Broadband or PSBB block), which has already been designated for public safety broadband use. If the D block is designated for public safety broadband use, the technical and licensing framework will apply to it as well.

A follow-up consultation will later be initiated to establish the details of the technical and licensing framework for all 700 MHz spectrum that is designated for public safety broadband use.

Commercial operators, public safety entities, equipment manufacturers, members of the public and other stakeholders are encouraged to read this document and to submit a reply to questions of interest to them.

Submitting comments

Respondents are requested to provide their comments in electronic format (WordPerfect, Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the following email address: Spectrum.Engineering@ic.gc.ca. In addition, respondents are asked to specify question numbers for ease of referencing.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Manager, Mobile Systems, Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch, Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SMSE-007-12). To ensure consideration, parties should submit their comments no later than October 24, 2012. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

The Department will also provide interested parties with the opportunity to reply to comments from other parties. Reply comments will be accepted until November 26, 2012.

Following the initial comment period, the Department may, at its discretion, request additional information if needed to clarify significant positions or new proposals. In such a case, the reply comment deadline would be extended.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

August 10, 2012

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

FIONA GILFILLAN
Director General
Spectrum Management Operations Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-013-12 — New issue of ICES-003

Notice is hereby given that Industry Canada is releasing the following revised document:

Interference-Causing Equipment Standard ICES-003, Issue 5, Information Technology Equipment (ITE) Limits and methods of measurement, sets out the technical requirements relative to radio noise generated by information technology equipment (ITE).

General information

ICES-003, Issue 5, will come into force as of the date of publication of this notice.

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC). The Radio Equipment Technical Standards Lists will be amended to reflect the above changes.

Any enquiries regarding ICES-003 should be directed to the Manager, Regulatory Standards, 613-990-4699 (telephone), 613-991-3961 (fax), res.nmr@ic.gc.ca (email).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

August 25, 2012

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL RESOURCES

EXPORT AND IMPORT OF ROUGH DIAMONDS REGULATIONS

Disposal of forfeited stones

Notice is hereby given that pursuant to section 31 of the Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act and subsection 11(4) of the Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Regulations, 214.96 carats of rough diamond stones, with estimated market value of $5,342.38, forfeited to Her Majesty in the right of Canada by order of the Honourable Judge Walter of the Provincial Court of Alberta on January 29, 2009, have been transferred to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Additionally, 260 rough diamond stones, for a total of 149.83 carats, in the custody of the RCMP Forensic Laboratory, with no market value, have also been transferred to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for training and education purposes.

August 17, 2012

ANIL ARORA
Assistant Deputy Minister
Minerals and Metals Sector

[34-1-o]

Footnote 1
CAS Registry Number: The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Footnote 2
DSL: Domestic Substances List

Footnote 3
CAS Registry Number: The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Footnote 4
DSL: Domestic Substances List

Footnote *
Correction