ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 22 — June 1, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Fuel Oil, No. 2 (CAS RN (see footnote 1) 68476-30-2) — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Fuel Oil No. 2 is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that the substance be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

And notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have released a risk management scope document for the substance to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VINCENZA GALATONE
Acting Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

STEVE MCCAULEY
Director General
Energy and Transportation Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Fuel Oil No. 2

The Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following fuel oil:

CAS RN (see footnote a)

DSL (see footnote b) Name

68476-30-2

Fuel Oil, No. 2

Fuel Oil No. 2 is primarily used as a fuel source for home heating. It was identified as a high priority for action during the categorization of the DSL, as it was determined to present greatest potential for exposure of individuals in Canada, and was considered to present a high hazard to human health. Fuel Oil No. 2 met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. This substance was included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because it is related to the petroleum sector and is considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

An analysis of Canadian Fuel Oil No. 2 spills data was completed for the years 2000–2009. A risk analysis was conducted with these data which indicates that there are on average approximately 10 spills per year during ship loading/unloading that are of sufficient size to be expected to be harmful to freshwater and marine organisms (fish, invertebrates, algae). In addition, Fuel Oil No. 2 is harmful to terrestrial organisms (invertebrates, plants) given the frequency and volume of spills to terrestrial habitats (an average of 200–300 spills per year to soil, of which average spill volumes cause harm).The majority of these releases (78%) are associated with storage tanks for home heating fuel.

Based on information presented in this screening assessment on the frequency and magnitude of spills, Fuel Oil No. 2 may cause harm to organisms in areas adjacent to sources of release; however, these releases do not compromise the broader integrity of the environment. It is proposed to conclude that Fuel Oil No. 2 (CAS RN 68476-30-2) meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that Fuel Oil No. 2 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of Fuel Oil No. 2 was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Skin painting studies in laboratory animals reported skin tumour development after chronic dermal exposure to Fuel Oil No. 2. Additionally, benzene, a component of Fuel Oil No. 2, has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen, and was added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. As the predominant route of exposure to Fuel Oil No. 2 was determined to be inhalation, estimates of cancer potency for inhalation of benzene were used to characterize risk to the general population from evaporative emissions of Fuel Oil No. 2.

Fuel Oil No. 2 exhibited positive genotoxicity results in in vivo and in vitro assays. No reproductive or developmental health effects were observed in rats via the inhalation routes of exposure, and limited effects were noted at high doses via the dermal route of exposure.

The potential for general population exposure to Fuel Oil No. 2 was evaluated. Based on limited data, residences using Fuel Oil No. 2 as a fuel source did not have ambient levels of marker volatile organic compounds that were elevated relative to residences using other types of home heating. In the event of a residential fuel storage tank leak, exposure of the general population was not identified as a concern for human health given leak mitigation measures in place, the limited duration of potential exposure and low acute toxicity of the fuel. Additionally, inhalation exposure to individuals residing in the vicinity of a bulk storage facility was characterized. Margins of exposure between upper-bounding estimates of exposure and estimates of cancer potency are considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. Accordingly, it is proposed to conclude that Fuel Oil No. 2 (CAS RN 68476-30-2) does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that Fuel Oil No. 2 (CAS RN 68476-30-2) meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the risk management scope document for this substance are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a substanceEthane, 1,2-dibromo- (1,2-dibromoethane), CAS (see footnote 2) No. 106-93-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 1,2-dibromoethane is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment report conducted on 1,2-dibromoethane pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that 1,2-dibromoethane does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on 1,2-Dibromoethane

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Ethane, 1,2-dibromo- (1,2-dibromoethane), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) 106-93-4. 1,2-Dibromoethane was identified as a priority for assessment because it met the criteria for persistence and/or bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms. It was also identified as a priority as it was considered to pose an intermediate potential for exposure of individuals in Canada and had been classified by international agencies on the basis of carcinogenicity.

The substance 1,2-dibromoethane is considered to be predominantly anthropogenic in origin, though detection of 1,2-dibromoethane in marine air and water suggests possible natural formation as a result of macroalgae growth. In Canada, 1,2-dibromoethane is solely used as a lead scavenger in leaded gasoline for high-performance competition vehicles and piston engine aircraft. Internationally, 1,2-dibromoethane may be used as a grain fumigant, a moth control agent in beehives, a wood preservative in the timber industry, an activator of magnesium in the preparation of Grignard reagents, a chemical intermediate in the production of vinyl bromide, plastic and latex, and in the formulation of flame retardants, polyester dyes, resins and waxes. Based on a survey conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999, between 10 000 and 100 000 kg of 1,2-dibromoethane were imported into Canada in the 2000 calendar year.

According to the available information, 1,2-dibromoethane does not degrade quickly in air, and it has a high potential for long-range transport in this medium. It also does not degrade quickly in groundwater. Low experimental bioconcentration factor values suggest that 1,2-dibromoethane has limited bioaccumulation potential in organisms. Therefore, 1,2-dibromoethane meets the criteria for persistence but not for bioaccumulation potential as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. In addition, experimental toxicity data for 1,2-dibromoethane suggests that this substance is not expected to cause acute harm to aquatic organisms at low concentrations.

In Canada, 1,2-dibromoethane is routinely monitored in ambient air, but not in water, soil or sediments. Risk characterization using conservative exposure concentrations measured in ground-water and soil from industrial and non-industrial sites, as well as modelled concentrations for surface water, and critical toxicity values for aquatic and soil organisms indicate that 1,2-dibromoethane is unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Based on the information available with regard to the environment, it is concluded that 1,2-dibromoethane does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical effect for the characterization of risk of 1,2-dibromoethane exposure to human health is the carcinogenicity, as there is strong evidence of the carcinogenicity of 1,2-dibromoethane in rats and mice following oral or inhalation exposure. 1,2-Dibromoethane was also genotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro assays. Therefore, although the mode of induction of tumours has not been fully elucidated, it cannot be precluded that the tumours observed in experimental animals resulted from direct interaction of 1,2-dibromoethane with genetic material.

As mentioned, the sole use of 1,2-dibromoethane in Canada is as a lead scavenger in leaded gasoline for specialized applications. Increases in the releases of this substance to the environment from leaded gasoline are not anticipated, as recent data suggests that the use quantities of these fuels are not increasing. Extensive outdoor and indoor air monitoring data exists for this substance. Although the substance has occasionally been detected at very low levels, it was not detected in over 99% of the samples analyzed from recent studies. No consumer products containing 1,2-dibromoethane were identified in Canada, thus exposure from use of consumer products is not expected.

On the basis of the use pattern of 1,2-dibromoethane and the very limited potential for general population exposure, it is concluded that 1,2-dibromoethane does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is concluded that 1,2-dibromoethane does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Because this substance is listed on the Domestic Substances List, it is not subject to notification under the New Substance Notification Regulations(Chemicals and Polymers). However, given its hazardous properties, there is concern that new activities that have not been identified or assessed under CEPA 1999 could lead to this substance meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act. Therefore, it is recommended to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that subsection 81(3) of the Act applies with respect to this substance, so that any significant new activity is declared and undergoes ecological and human health risk assessments before the substance is imported, manufactured or used for the significant new activity.

The Screening Assessment Report on 1,2-dibromoethane is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 40 petroleum and refinery gases specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 40 substances identified in the annex below as petroleum and refinery gases (the “substances”) are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that these substances be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health are releasing a proposed risk management approach document for these substances on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca) to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the Ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substances.

Public comment period on the proposed risk management approach document

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment of the 40 Petroleum and Refinery Gases Listed Below

The Ministers of the Environment and Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases:

CAS RN (see footnote 3)

Domestic Substances List (DSL) name
(see footnote 4)

68307-99-3

tail gas (petroleum), catalytic polymerized naphtha fractionation stabilizer

68476-26-6

fuel gases

68476-49-3

hydrocarbons, C2-C4, C3-rich

68477-69-0

gases (petroleum), butane splitter overhead

68477-71-4

gases (petroleum), catalytic cracked gas oil depropanizer bottom, C4-rich acid-free

68477-72-5

gases (petroleum), catalytic cracked naphtha debutanizer bottom, C3-C5-rich

68477-73-6

gases (petroleum), catalytic cracked naphtha depropanizer overhead, C3-rich acid-free

68477-75-8

gases (petroleum), catalytic cracker, C1-C5-rich

68477-76-9

gases (petroleum), catalytic polymerized naphtha stabilizer overhead, C2-C4-rich

68477-77-0

gases (petroleum), catalytic reformed naphtha stripper overhead

68477-86-1

gases (petroleum), deethanizer overhead

68477-87-2

gases (petroleum), deisobutanizer tower overhead

68477-93-0

gases (petroleum), gas concentration reabsorber distillation

68477-97-4

gases (petroleum), hydrogen-rich

68478-00-2

gases (petroleum), recycle, hydrogen-rich

68478-01-3

gases (petroleum), reformer make-up, hydrogen-rich

68478-05-7

gases (petroleum), thermal cracking distillation

68478-25-1

tail gas (petroleum), catalytic cracker refractionation absorber

68478-29-5

tail gas (petroleum), cracked distillate hydrotreater separator

68478-32-0

tail gas (petroleum), saturate gas plant mixed stream, C4-rich

68478-34-2

tail gas (petroleum), vacuum residue thermal cracker

68512-91-4

hydrocarbons, C3-C4-rich, petroleum distillates

68513-16-6

gases (petroleum), hydrocracking depropanizer off, hydrocarbon-rich

68513-17-7

gases (petroleum), light straight-run naphtha stabilizer off

68513-18-8

gases (petroleum), reformer effluent high-pressure flash drum off

68514-31-8

hydrocarbons, C1-C4

68514-36-3

hydrocarbons, C1-C4, sweetened

68527-16-2

hydrocarbons, C1-C3

68602-83-5

gases (petroleum), C1-C5, wet

68602-84-6

gases (petroleum), secondary absorber off, fluidized catalytic cracker overhead fractionater

68606-27-9

gases (petroleum), alkylation feed

68607-11-4

petroleum products, refinery gases

68814-67-5

gases (petroleum), refinery

68911-58-0

gases (petroleum), hydrotreated sour kerosine depentanizer stabilizer off

68918-99-0

gases (petroleum), crude oil fractionation off

68919-02-8

gases (petroleum), fluidized catalytic cracker fractionation off

68919-04-0

gases (petroleum), heavy distillate hydrotreater desulfurization stripper off

68919-08-4

gases (petroleum), preflash tower off, crude distillation

68919-10-8

gases (petroleum), straight-run stabilizer off

68952-79-4

tail gas (petroleum), catalytic hydrodesulfurized naphtha separator

These substances were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of the Domestic Substances List, as they were determined to present “greatest potential” or “intermediate potential” for exposure of individuals in Canada and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. Although they met the categorization criteria for persistence in the environment, they did not meet the ecological categorization criteria for bioaccumulation or inherent toxicity to non-human organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach because they are related to the petroleum sector and are all complex combinations of petroleum hydrocarbons.

Petroleum and refinery gases, produced from petroleum facilities (i.e. refining, upgrading or natural gas processing facilities), are a category of saturated and unsaturated light hydrocarbons. The compositions of petroleum and refinery gases vary depending on the source of the crude oil, bitumen, or natural gas as well as the process operating conditions and processing units used. Therefore, petroleum and refinery gases are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs). In order to predict the overall behaviour of these complex substances for the purposes of assessing the potential for ecological effects, representative structures have been selected from each chemical class in the substances.

Site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases can serve as fuels, as intermediates for further separation of components, or as feedstocks for chemical transformation processes within a facility.

The petroleum and refinery gases considered in this screening assessment have been identified as site-restricted (i.e. they are a subset of petroleum and refinery gases that are not expected to be transported off the petroleum facility sites). According to information reported under section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), and other sources of information, these 40 site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases are consumed on site or are blended into substances leaving the site under different CAS RNs. However, it has been recognized that, given the physical-chemical properties of these gases (e.g. high vapour pressures), releases of the petroleum and refinery gases into the atmosphere can occur. Dispersion modelling results show that unintentional releases of these site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases contribute to ambient background levels of 1,3-butadiene in the vicinity of petroleum facilities.

Based on the current available information, none of the substances bearing these CAS RNs contain components that meet the bioaccumulation criteria as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. However, many of the components of site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases persist in the atmosphere and meet the persistence criteria in the Regulations.

A number of regulatory and non-regulatory measures are already in place in Canada to limit releases of site-restricted petroleum substances, including provincial/territorial operating permit requirements, and best practices and guidelines put in place by the petroleum industry at refinery, upgrader and natural gas processing facilities. Based on results of dispersion modelling, concentrations of components of petroleum and refinery gases in air surrounding petroleum facilities are not expected to be at levels that could result in harm to the environment.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the 40 site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases included in this screening assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) and (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

One component of petroleum and refinery gases, ethene, is being considered in a separate assessment, and its potential to cause harm is not considered in this assessment. This will allow consideration of ethene releases from industrial operations generally, rather than attempting to link its release to the specific substances that are the subject of the current assessment.

Site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases were identified as a high priority for action as they were considered to present high hazard to human health. A critical effect for categorization of human health for petroleum and refinery gases was carcinogenicity, as another jurisdiction (the European Union) has identified petroleum and refinery gases containing 1,3-butadiene at concentrations greater than 0.1% by weight as carcinogens. Additionally, 1,3-butadiene has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen and was added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. 1,3-Butadiene was found to be a multi-site carcinogen in rodents, increasing the incidence of tumours at all inhalation concentrations tested. 1,3-Butadiene also exhibits genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and a plausible mode of action for induction of tumours involves direct interaction with genetic material.

The substance 1,3-butadiene was selected as a high hazard component to characterize potential exposure to the general population as it is considered, based on available information, to be present in these petroleum and refinery gases. While the exposure would be limited, it is recognized that a small portion of the general population may be exposed to these petroleum and refinery gases in the vicinity of the petroleum facilities.

Furthermore, margins between high end estimates of exposure to 1,3-butadiene and estimates of cancer potency are considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the 40 site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases meet the criteria in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the 40 site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases listed under CAS RNs 68307-99-3, 68476-26-6, 68476-49-3, 68477-69-0, 68477-71-4, 68477-72-5, 68477-73-6, 68477-75-8, 68477-76-9, 68477-77-0, 68477-86-1, 68477-87-2, 68477-93-0, 68477-97-4, 68478-00-2, 68478-01-3, 68478-05-7, 68478-25-1, 68478-29-5, 68478-32-0, 68478-34-2, 68512-91-4, 68513-16-6, 68513-17-7, 68513-18-8, 68514-31-8, 68514-36-3, 68527-16-2, 68602-83-5, 68602-84-6, 68606-27-9, 68607-11-4, 68814-67-5, 68911-58-0, 68918-99-0, 68919-02-8, 68919-04-0, 68919-08-4, 68919-10-8 and 68952-79-4 meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report as well as the proposed risk management approach document for these substances are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substanceEthene, 1,1-dichloro- (1,1-dichloroethene), CAS (see footnote 5) No. 75-35-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment report on 1,1-dichloroethene conducted pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that 1,1-dichloroethene does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on 1,1-Dichloroethene

Pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Ethene, 1,1-dichloro- (1,1-dichloroethene), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 75-35-4. 1,1-Dichloroethene was identified as a priority for assessment of human health risk because it has been classified by other agencies on the basis of carcinogenicity.

The substance 1,1-dichloroethene is a chlorinated organic compound that was used in solvents and as an intermediate in a variety of chemical processes. Based on a survey issued under section 71 of CEPA 1999, between 10 and 100 tonnes of 1,1-dichloroethene were manufactured in and imported into Canada in 2000. However, the substance is no longer produced in or imported into Canada. Small amounts of 1,1-dichloroethene are created unintentionally in several industrial processes; most of this material is reformed into other substances within the facilities.

Globally, 1,1-dichloroethene is used primarily as an intermediate in the manufacture of polyvinylidene chloride polymers and copolymers, which may in turn be used in a variety of end products such as food plastic wrap, carpet latex backing, fire- and ignition-resistant clothing, vapour barriers for insulation, paper and board coatings, and photographic film. 1,1-Dichloroethene may persist as an unintended manufacturing residue in some of these items that may be present in Canadian commerce. 1,1-Dichloroethene may also be used in the production of hydrochlorofluorocarbons, chloroacetyl chloride, and latex and resins; as an aid in ore flotation; as a solvent in paint and varnish remover; and as a vapour degreaser and industrial cleaning agent.

The substance 1,1-dichloroethene is reportable to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI); reported releases steadily declined from 87 kg in 2000 to 1 kg in 2003. Since 2003, no companies have reported releases of 1,1-dichloroethene to the NPRI.

The substance 1,1-dichloroethene can be released during the breakdown of polyvinylidene chloride products and during the abiotic and biotic decomposition of the dry cleaning and degreasing solvents 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene (tetrachloroethene or perchloroethylene), 1,1,2-trichloroethene and 1,2-dichloroethane. Many of these solvents are no longer used in Canada and disposal practices have improved, such that significant new sources of 1,1-dichloroethene in groundwater and soil are unlikely. Recent monitoring data show that 1,1-dichloroethene is present in urban air at very low concentrations, often just above analytical detection limits.

Based on experimental and modelled data for 1,1-dichloroethene, the substance is expected to degrade readily in air, soil and water. Based on its physical and chemical properties and predictions from bioaccumulation models, the substance is not expected to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. Therefore, 1,1-dichloroethene does not meet the criteria for persistence and bioaccumulation potential as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. In addition, available empirical ecotoxicity data (for mammals, aquatic and terrestrial plants, invertebrates and vertebrates) indicate that 1,1-dichloroethene is not highly hazardous to non-human organisms.

Based on the low concentrations measured or expected in the Canadian environment and low hazards of the substance, there is a very low likelihood of ecological harm from 1,1-dichloroethene in the Canadian environment, especially given the low persistence and potential for bioaccumulation of 1,1-dichloroethene and decreasing uses and releases.

Based on the information available, 1,1-dichloroethene does not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) and (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Exposure of the general population to 1,1-dichloroethene is mainly from indoor air and possibly food. A comparison of the lowest critical inhalation effect level for non-cancer effects with the highest median concentration of 1,1-dichloroethene in indoor air from recent studies in Canada and a comparison of the critical oral effect level for non-cancer effects and the upper-bounding estimate of daily intake result in margins of exposure which are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for chronic non-cancer effects. Additionally, for non-cancer effects based on a less than chronic period, a comparison of the lowest critical inhalation effect level for such periods with the highest 95th percentile concentration of 1,1- dichloroethene in air from recent studies in Canada results in a margin of exposure which is considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

A critical effect for the characterization of risk linked to 1,1-dichloroethene is carcinogenicity. Following a lifetime inhalation of 1,1-dichloroethene at high concentrations, mice developed renal tumours. A comparison of the critical effect level for cancer and the upper-bounding estimate of daily intakes results in margins of exposure which are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for cancer effects. Additionally, available information suggests that the mode of tumour induction in experimental animals may not be relevant to humans.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that 1,1-dichloroethene does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is concluded that 1,1-dichloroethene does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

The Screening Assessment Report on 1,1-dichloroethene is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bright, Katherine Edith

2013-560

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Member

 

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Crowhurst, Timothy J.

2013-557

Pemberton, F. George

2013-556

Sunley, W. J. Sterling

2013-558

Kalman, Harold D.

2013-559

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada

 

Member

 

Khosrowshahi, Nezhat

2013-561

National Gallery of Canada

 

Trustee of the Board of Trustees

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time member

 

Hart, James Alexander

2013-563

Part-time member

 

Andersen, Bent

2013-564

Social Security Tribunal

 

Employment Insurance Section

 

Full-time members

 

Hamilton, Heather Jane

2013-555

Reinsch, Simone Marie Jeannette

2013-554

Williamson, Randy W.

2013-562

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson

 

May 24, 2013

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being part of lot 4 012 853 and part of lot 4 012 854 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from Ghislain Lavoie, Gilles Lavoie and Jean-Claude Lavoie;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

Part of lot 4 012 853

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 853 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 1, 2012 under number 3589 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 3 154.6 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 854

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 854 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “B”, on a plan prepared November 1, 2012 under number 3589 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 3 777.6 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from Ghislain Lavoie, Gilles Lavoie and Jean-Claude Lavoie to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovable known and designated as lot 4 012 868 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovable”) from Frédéric Gagné, Isabelle Gagné and Ginette Larouche;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovable in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

4 012 868

An immovable known and designated as lot 4 012 868 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated on a plan prepared November 13, 2012 under number 3597 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 214 298.5 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovable from Frédéric Gagné, Isabelle Gagné and Ginette Larouche to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovable known and designated as being part of lot 4 012 874 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovable”) from Ferme Boivin, S.E.N.C.;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovable in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

Part of lot 4 012 874

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 874 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 9, 2012 under number 3593 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 32 826.6 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovable from Ferme Boivin, S.E.N.C. to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being part of lot 4 012 891, part of lot 4 012 893 and part of lot 4 012 894 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from Bruno Lavoie;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

Part of lot 4 012 891

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 891 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3594 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 9 388.2 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 893

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 893 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “B”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3594 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 7 736.0 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 894

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 894 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “C”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3594 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 14 059.0 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from Bruno Lavoie to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being lot 4 013 011, lot 4 013 012, part of lot 4 012 885, part of lot 4 012 886, part of lot 4 012 888 and part of lot 4 012 890 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from Ferme Jean-Marie Maltais et Fils Inc.;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

4  013 011

An immovable known and designated as lot 4 013 011 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “E”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 1 810.0 m2.

4 013 012

An immovable known and designated as lot 4 013 012 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “H”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 620.0 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 885

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 885 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 66 832.0 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 886

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 886 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “C”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 20 688.4 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 888

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 888 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “F”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 1 537.1 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 890

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 890 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “J”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3596 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 10 473.3 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from Ferme Jean-Marie Maltais et Fils Inc. to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being lot 4 014 179, part of lot 4 012 444 and part of lot 4 014 178 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from Marcel Maltais;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

4 014 179

An immovable known and designated as lot 4 014 179 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “G”, on a plan prepared November 19, 2012 under number 3601 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 1 246.1 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 444

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 444 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcels “A” and “D”, on a plan prepared November 19, 2012 under number 3601 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 32 498.1 m2.

Part of lot 4 014 178

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 014 178 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “F”, on a plan prepared November 19, 2012 under number 3601 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 8 091.8 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from Marcel Maltais to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being lot 4 242 423, part of lot 4 012 443, part of lot 4 242 415, part of lot 4 242 416 and part of lot 4 242 417 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from Gérard Simard;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

4 242 423

An immovable known and designated as lot 4 242 423 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “J”, on a plan prepared November 16, 2012 under number 3600 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 2 451.4 m2.

Part of lot 4 012 443

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 012 443 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 16, 2012 under number 3600 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 31 816.4 m2.

Part of lot 4 242 415

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 415 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “C”, on a plan prepared November 16, 2012 under number 3600 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 11 837.8 m2.

Part of lot 4 242 416

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 416 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “E”, on a plan prepared November 16, 2012 under number 3600 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 9 024.1 m2.

Part of lot 4 242 417

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 417 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “G”, on a plan prepared November 16, 2012 under number 3600 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 8 673,5 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from Gérard Simard to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Saguenay Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Saguenay Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovables known and designated as being part of lot 4 242 426, part of lot 4 242 521 and part of lot 4 242 522 of the cadastre of Quebec (“Immovables”) from 3099-9965 Québec Inc.;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the Immovables in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

Part of lot 4 242 426

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 426 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “B”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3595 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 6 846.0 m2.

Part of lot 4 242 521

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 521 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “A”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3595 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 7 406.4 m2.

Part of lot 4 242 522

An immovable known and designated as part of lot 4 242 522 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Chicoutimi, city of Saguenay, as illustrated, and identified as Parcel “C”, on a plan prepared November 12, 2012 under number 3595 of the minutes of Louis-Alain Tremblay, land surveyor, containing an area of 4 384.0 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Quebec, Registration Division of Chicoutimi, of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the Immovables from 3099-9965 Québec Inc. to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 7th day of May, 2013.

___________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[22-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN FORCES GRIEVANCE BOARD

Vice-chairperson (full-time position)

Salary range: $105,900–$124,500

Location: National Capital Region

The Canadian Forces Grievance Board (CFGB or Board) was created in 2000 and is an administrative tribunal with adjudicative powers. It is independent from the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces. The CFGB reports to Parliament through the Minister of National Defence.

The CFGB reviews military grievances referred to it pursuant to section 29 of the National Defence Act, and provides findings and recommendations to the Chief of the Defence Staff and the Canadian Forces member who submitted the grievance.

The Board’s mission is to provide an independent and external review of military grievances, thereby strengthening confidence in, and adding to the fairness of, the Canadian Forces grievance process.

Reporting to the Chairperson, the Vice-Chairperson provides executive support in the management of a small national organization. The Vice-Chairperson’s responsibilities include overseeing and managing the Board’s grievance portfolio and ensuring the consistency, quality, and timeliness of the recommendations made by Board members.

The Vice-Chairperson may exercise any of the powers, duties or functions of the Chairperson, as delegated by the Chairperson. In the event of the absence or incapacity of the Chairperson, the Vice-Chairperson has the responsibility for the functioning of the Board.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The qualified candidate will have management experience in a public or private sector organization, including managing human and financial resources. The ideal candidate will also have professional experience in one or several of the following fields: experience as a member or decision-maker in an adjudicative tribunal, agency or an equivalent; experience in making findings and recommendations in a non-adjudicative organization; and experience in the interpretation and application of legislation, regulations, policies or directives. Experience with the Canadian Forces would be considered an asset.

The preferred candidate will have an understanding of the operations of government, including those related to sound management principles, accountability and transparency. Knowledge of the principles of procedural fairness as well as of the Canadian Forces organization and structure is required. He or she should also be knowledgeable about the role, mandate and responsibilities of the CFGB, as well as about the National Defence Act and Chapter 7 of the Queen’s Regulations and Orders for the Canadian Forces.

The position requires an individual who has the capacity to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies, and to analyze complex situations in order to make equitable and timely findings and recommendations while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences. The ability to exercise independent judgement while working alone or as part of a panel or team is desirable. The suitable candidate will have the ability to think strategically with a focus on pursuing the Board’s mission and vision. The capacity to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, with people from both military and civilian backgrounds is also necessary.

The successful candidate should possess strong leadership, managerial, motivational and interpersonal skills, as well as be a person of sound judgement and integrity. He or she should adhere to high ethical standards, have initiative, be adaptable and flexible, and demonstrate tact and discretion in managing sensitive information.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the CFGB and its activities can be found on its Web site at: www.cfgb-cgfc.gc.ca/English/home.html.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by June 17, 2013, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[22-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE EXTERNAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

Chairperson (full-time position)

Salary: $139,900 to $164,500

Location: National Capital Region

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee (RCMP ERC) is an impartial agency that aims to promote fair and equitable labour relations within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in accordance with applicable principles of law. The Committee conducts an independent review of appeals in disciplinary measures, and discharge and demotion matters, as well as certain categories of grievances, in accordance with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act. It provides findings and recommendations that must be considered by the Commissioner of the RCMP in rendering his decisions. In carrying out this legislative mandate, the Committee must consider jurisprudential trends in administrative and labour law and the evolution of government policies and directives applicable to RCMP members.

The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the RCMP ERC responsible for its efficient and effective operation and sets the direction of the work and supervises the staff of the Committee. The Chairperson tables an annual report to Parliament through the Minister of Public Safety on the activities of the Committee and, when appropriate, includes recommendations for changes in the management practices and disciplinary processes of the RCMP.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have management experience in a private or public sector organization, including managing human and financial resources. The preferred candidate would also have experience in the interpretation and application of legislation, government policies and directives in an adjudicative environment. Further, the suitable candidate would have experience in the development of policies, performance standards and operational procedures. Experience in the operation and conduct of an adjudicative tribunal as well as experience in the police labour relations field would be considered assets.

The qualified candidate would have knowledge of the RCMP ERC’s mandate and activities, of the RCMP Act and other relevant legislation. Knowledge of the operations of the federal government, including those related to sound management principles, accountability and transparency, is required. The preferred candidate would have knowledge of administrative law, the principles of natural justice and the rules and practices followed by adjudicative tribunals in Canada. An understanding of the culture of the RCMP and its management approaches and challenges, including public pressures that have an effect on the organization, is necessary.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to analyze all aspects of a case and to interpret and apply the relevant criteria with a view to making lawful, fair and equitable decisions. He or she should also possess the skill to provide the corporate vision, leadership and strategic direction needed for the RCMP ERC to achieve its mandate and objectives. The preferred candidate would be able to analyze complex situations in order to develop strategies and make appropriate decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term impact, and be able to perform under tight time constraints and in stressful circumstances. The ability to develop effective working relationships with the Minister as well as departmental officials, while maintaining the degree of independence required of an adjudicative tribunal, is desired. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, and the ability to act as a spokesperson in representing the RCMP ERC with stakeholders, media, public institutions, governments and other organizations, will also be required.

To achieve the Committee’s objectives and carry out its mandate, the Chairperson would possess excellent leadership and superior interpersonal skills. The successful candidate would also demonstrate high ethical standards and integrity, sound judgement, tact, impartiality and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance. He or she must be prepared to travel throughout Canada and abroad on occasion. No member of the RCMP is eligible to become Chairperson.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Additional information on the RCMP ERC and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.erc-cee.gc.ca/index-eng.aspx.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by June 17, 2013, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote 4
    Revisions have been proposed to the DSL names of some of the site-restricted petroleum and refinery gases. See Appendix 6 of the screening assessment report for a table of the DSL substance names used in the draft screening assessment and the revised names used in the current assessment.

  • Footnote 5
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote a
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote b
    DSL: Domestic Substances List