ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 24 — June 15, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions regarding the processing of applications to sponsor parents and grandparents as members of the family class

Notice is hereby given, under subsection 87.3(6) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, that the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism has established the following Ministerial Instructions that, in the opinion of the Minister, will best support the attainment of the immigration goals established by the Government of Canada.

Overview

Authority for Ministerial Instructions is derived from section 87.3 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). Instructions are directed to officers and the Minister’s delegates who are charged with handling and/or reviewing applications, including for permanent or temporary visas to enter Canada and applications for sponsorship of a family member.

These Instructions apply to applications for sponsorship of the sponsor’s mother or father [paragraph 117(1)(c) of the Immigration Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR)] or the mother or father of the sponsor’s mother or father (paragraph 117(1)(d) of the IRPR) [hereafter Parents and Grandparents] as members of the family class that are received by the designated CIC office as per the dates set out below in Parts One and Two.

Any categories for which Instructions are not specifically issued shall continue to be processed in the usual manner, as per processing priorities established by the Department.

These Instructions are consistent with the IRPA objectives as laid out in section 3 and are compliant with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The Instructions respect all previously established accords and agreements including the Quebec-Canada Accord and all existing agreements with provinces and territories.

These Instructions, with the exception of Part Two which comes into force on January 2, 2014, come into force on their date of publication in the Canada Gazette.

Applications for sponsorship of a Parent or Grandparent

These Instructions are intended to manage the processing of applications for sponsorship of Parents and Grandparents as a member of the family class, to contribute to a strategy to reduce the current backlog of applications and to reduce the likelihood of future backlogs and lengthy wait times.

Part One — Extension of the temporary pause on applications to sponsor Parents and Grandparents as members of the family class

The temporary pause on the acceptance for processing of new applications for sponsorship of Parents and Grandparents as members of the family class, which has been in place since November 5, 2011, will remain in place until January 1, 2014.

Part Two — Cap on the number of applications to sponsor Parents and Grandparents as members of the family class to be processed as of January 2, 2014

Beginning January 2, 2014, a maximum of 5 000 new complete applications for sponsorship of Parents and Grandparents as members of the family class will be accepted for processing each year, unless otherwise indicated in a future Ministerial Instruction.

These applications will be processed only if received by the Centralized Processing Centre in Mississauga, Ontario (hereafter CPC-Mississauga), on or after January 2, 2014.

In order to be included under the cap and considered for processing, applications must be completed according to the application kit requirements in place at the time the application is received by CPC-Mississauga.

In calculating the cap, sponsorship applications for Parents and Grandparents will be considered in the order of the date they are received. Applications received on the same date will be considered for processing having regard to routine office procedures.

The cap year will begin on January 2, 2014, and end on January 1, 2015, unless otherwise indicated in a future Ministerial Instruction. Subsequent years will be calculated from January 2 to January 1 of the following year, unless otherwise indicated in a future Ministerial Instruction.

No humanitarian and compassionate requests to overcome requirements of Ministerial Instructions

Requests made on the basis of humanitarian and compassionate grounds made from outside Canada that accompany any sponsorship application for Parents or Grandparents affected by Ministerial Instructions but not identified for processing under the Instructions will not be processed.

Retention/Disposition

Applicants whose applications to sponsor Parents and Grandparents do not meet the criteria described above shall be informed that their application will not continue for processing and shall have their processing fee returned.

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DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin

Whereas, pursuant to paragraph 109.1(2)(a) (see footnote a) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote b), the number of claims for refugee protection made in Canada by nationals of each of the countries set out in section 1 of the annexed Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin in respect of which the Refugee Protection Division has made a final determination is equal to or greater than the number provided in the Order Establishing Quantitative Thresholds for the Designation of Countries of Origin (see footnote c) and the conditions set out in subparagraph 109.1(2)(a)(i) (see footnote d) or (ii) (see footnote e) of the Act are met with respect to those claims for refugee protection;

Therefore, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to subsection 109.1(1) (see footnote f) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote g), makes the annexed Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin.

Ottawa, May 29, 2013

JASON KENNEY
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

ORDER AMENDING THE ORDER DESIGNATING COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

1. Schedule 1 to the Order is amended by adding the following:

Chile

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on May 31, 2013.

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DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin

Whereas, pursuant to paragraph 109.1(2)(a) (see footnote h) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote i), the number of claims for refugee protection made in Canada by nationals of each of the countries set out in section 1 of the annexed Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin in respect of which the Refugee Protection Division has made a final determination is equal to or greater than the number provided in the Order Establishing Quantitative Thresholds for the Designation of Countries of Origin (see footnote j) and the conditions set out in subparagraph 109.1(2)(a)(i) (see footnote k) or (ii) (see footnote l) of the Act are met with respect to those claims for refugee protection;

Therefore, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to subsection 109.1(1) (see footnote m) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote n), makes the annexed Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin.

Ottawa, May 29, 2013

JASON KENNEY
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

ORDER AMENDING THE ORDER DESIGNATING COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

1. Schedule 1 to the Order is amended by adding the following:

South Korea

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on May 31, 2013.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 17160

Ministerial Condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance Amines, N,N,N′-trimethyl-N′-alkyltrimethylenedi, reaction products with sodium chloroacetate, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on February 26, 2013, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

“substance” means the substance Amines, N,N,N′-trimethyl-N′- alkyltrimethylenedi, reaction products with sodium chloroacetate and excludes bitumen emulsions containing that substance.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restriction

3. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance only to incorporate it as a component of bitumen emulsions in commercial or industrial settings, or to transfer its physical possession or control to a person who will use it only as a component of bitumen emulsions in commercial or industrial settings.

4. At least 120 days prior to beginning manufacturing of the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

  • (a) the information specified in paragraph 7(a) of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (b) the address of the manufacturing facility within Canada;
  • (c) the information specified in paragraphs 8(a) to (d) and items 9 and 10 of Schedule 5 to those Regulations;
  • (d) a brief description of the manufacturing process that details the reactants used, reaction stoichiometry, batch or continuous nature of the process, and scale of the process;
  • (e) a flow diagram of the manufacturing process that includes features such as process tanks, holding tanks and distillation towers; and
  • (f) a brief description of the major steps in manufacturing operations, the chemical conversions, the points of entry of all reactants and the points of release of the substance, and the processes to eliminate environmental release.
Handling and Disposal of the Substance

5. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must

  • (a) thoroughly rinse any containers or transportation vessels that contained the substance prior to their disposal or reconditioning and
    • (i) incorporate the rinsate as a component of bitumen emulsions, or
    • (ii) dispose of the rinsate as waste in accordance with subparagraph (b)(i) or (ii); or
  • (b) destroy or dispose of any containers or transportation vessels that contained the substance and are not to be reused for the substance in the following manner:
    • (i) incinerate them in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the disposal facility is located, or
    • (ii) deposit them in a secure landfill, in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the landfill is located.
Environmental Release

6. Where any release of the substance to the environment occurs, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release and to limit the dispersion of the substance. Furthermore, the person shall inform the Minister of the Environment immediately by contacting an enforcement officer, designated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, of the Environment Canada regional office that is closest to where the release occurred.

Record-keeping Requirements

7. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

  • (a) the use of the substance;
  • (b) the quantity of the substance that the notifier manufactures, imports, purchases, sells and uses;
  • (c) the name and address of each person to whom the notifier transfers the physical possession or control of the substance; and
  • (d) the name and address of the person in Canada who has destroyed or disposed of the waste for the notifier, the method used to do so, and the quantities of waste shipped to that person.

(2) The notifier shall maintain the electronic or paper records mentioned in subitem (1) at the notifier’s principal place of business in Canada for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other Requirements

8. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the transfer, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the notifier’s principal place of business in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into Force

9. These ministerial conditions come into force on June 3, 2013.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 17122

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, alkyl ester, polymer with ethenylbenzene, methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and 2-oxiranylmethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, tert-Bu peroxide-initiated under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. In relation to the substance 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, alkyl ester, polymer with ethenylbenzene, methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and 2-oxiranylmethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, tert-Bu peroxide-initiated, a significant new activity is its use in coatings and adhesives that are consumer products as defined in section 2 of the Canada Consumer Products Safety Act, in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg per calendar year.

2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:

  • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
  • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
  • (c) the information specified in Schedule 9 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), except subparagraph 13(d)(iv);
  • (d) the information specified in item 5 of Schedule 10 to those Regulations, except paragraph (b);
  • (e) the information specified in item 10 of Schedule 11 to those Regulations;
  • (f) where the quantity of the substance involved in the significant new activity exceeds 50 000 kg per calendar year, the information specified in paragraph 11(3)(a) to those Regulations;
  • (g) the identification of every government department or government agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and, if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency; and
  • (h) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.

3. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of benzidine-based substances and benzidine derivatives specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) and subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 40 of the 42 benzidine-based dyes and related substances identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the 42 substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the 42 substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these 42 substances at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), or by email to substances@ec.gc.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Benzidine-based Dyes and Related Substances

Pursuant to sections 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on 42 substances in the aromatic azo and benzidine-based substances grouping under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP). These substances are among those identified as priorities for action following the categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they met the Government of Canada’s categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered as priorities for assessment under the CMP based on other human health concerns. Information on an additional two substances, Acid Red 111 and Direct Black 38, which were previously assessed and about which conclusions were drawn by the Government of Canada under the Challenge initiative of the CMP, were also considered in this assessment to better inform the assessment of these substances. There are no changes to the conclusions made with respect to Acid Red 111 and Direct Black 38 when they were previously assessed. The substances considered in this assessment belong to five subgroups based on structural similarity and applications: benzidine-based acid dyes (9 substances), benzidine-based direct dyes (24 substances), benzidine-based cationic indicators (2 substances), benzidine-based precursors (2 substances) and benzidine derivatives (5 substances). The identities of the 42 substances are presented in the following tables.

Identity of the nine benzidine-based acid dyes (see footnote o)

CAS RN
(see footnote 1)

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

3701-40-4

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy3-[[4′-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]2,2′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]

Acid Red 99

6459-94-5

1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 8-[[3,3′-dimethyl-4′-[[4-[[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]oxy]phenyl]azo] [1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-7-hydroxy-, disodium salt

Acid Red 114

6470-20-8

[1,1′-Biphenyl]-2,2′-disulfonic acid, 4-[(4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1-phenyl1H-pyrazol-4-yl)azo]-4′-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

Acid Orange 56

6548-30-7

1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 8-[[3,3′-dimethoxy-4′-[[4-[[(4-methylphenyl) sulfonyl]oxy]phenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]4-yl]azo]-7-hydroxy-, disodium salt

Acid Red 128

68318-35-4

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4′-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]5-hydroxy-6-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-, trisodium salt

Acid Black 209

68400-36-2

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-6-[[4′-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl [1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-3[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

NAAHD

83221-63-0

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4′-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]2,2′-disulfo[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-, sodium salt

NAADD

89923-60-4

Benzenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(2,2′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]4,4′-diyl)bis[azo(4,5-dihydro-3-methyl5-oxo-1H-pyrazole-4,1-

BADB

10169-02-5

[1,1′-Biphenyl]-2,2′-disulfonic acid, 4,4′-bis[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

Acid Red 97

Abbreviations: CAS RN, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number; DSL, Domestic Substances List.

Identity of the 24 benzidine-based direct dyes (see footnote p)

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

72-57-1

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Blue 14

573-58-0

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diylbis(azo)]bis[4-amino-, disodium salt

Direct Red 28

992-59-6

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-amino-, disodium salt

Direct Red 2

2150-54-1

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4,5-dihydroxy-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Blue 25

2429-71-2

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, disodium salt

Direct Blue 8

2429-74-5

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Blue 15

6420-06-0

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-5-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, disodium salt

Direct Violet 28

6420-22-0

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-3-[[4′-[(6-amino-1-hydroxy3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]4-hydroxy-, trisodium salt

Direct Blue 295

6449-35-0

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4′-[(6-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, disodium salt

Direct Blue 151

6548-29-4

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4,4′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[3-amino-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Red 46

6655-95-4

Acetic acid, 2,2′-[[4,4′-bis[[1-hydroxy-6[(4-methoxyphenyl)amino]-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-3,3′-diyl]bis(oxy)]bis-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Blue 158

16071-86-6

Cuprate(2−), [5-[[4′-[[2,6-dihydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxybenzoato(4-)]-, disodium

Direct Brown 95

67923-89-1

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, trilithium salt

NAAH·3Li

70210-28-5

Benzoic acid, 5-[[4′-[[6-amino-5-(1H-benzotriazol-5-ylazo)-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxy-4-methyl-, disodium salt

BABHS

71215-83-3

Benzoic acid, 5-[[4′-[(2-amino-8-hydroxy-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-2,2′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxy-, disodium salt

BAHSD

71550-22-6

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetralithium salt

NADB·4Li

72252-59-6

[1,1′-Biphenyl]-3,3′-dicarboxylic acid, 4-[[5-[[5-(aminosulfonyl)-2-hydroxyphenyl]azo]-1-hydroxy-6-(phenylamino)-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-4′-[[1-[[(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-oxopropyl]azo]-, tetrasodium salt

BDAAH

75659-72-2

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, monolithium trisodium salt

NADB·Li·3Na

75659-73-3

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, dilithium disodium salt

NADB·2Li·2Na

75673-18-6

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, monolithium disodium salt

NAAH·Li·2Na

75673-19-7

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, dilithium monosodium salt

NAAH·2Li·Na

75673-34-6

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, dilithium salt

NADB·2Li

75673-35-7

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, monolithium monosodium salt

NADB·Li·Na

75752-17-9

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, trilithium monosodium salt

NADB·3Li·Na

Identity of the two benzidine-based cationic indicators

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

298-83-9

2H-Tetrazolium, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[2-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-, dichloride

TDBPD

1871-22-3

2H-Tetrazolium, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[2,5-diphenyl-, dichloride

TDBD

Identity of the two benzidine-based precursors

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

91-92-9

Naphthalenecarboxamide, N,N′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]4,4′-diyl)bis[3-hydroxy-

Naphthol AS-BR

93940-21-7

1-Triazene-1-carbonitrile, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis-

TCDB

Identity of the five benzidine derivatives

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour
Index name
or acronym

91-97-4

1,1′-Biphenyl, 4,4′-diisocyanato-3,3′-dimethyl-

TODI

119-90-4

1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethoxy-

3,3′-DMOB

119-93-7
(see footnote 2)

1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethyl-

3,3′-DMB

366-29-0

[1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-

4N-TMB

612-82-8
(see footnote 3)

1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethyl-, dihydrochloride

3,3′-DMB·2HCl

For the purpose of this screening assessment, four subgroups (benzidine-based acid dyes, direct dyes, cationic indicators and precursors) are collectively referred to as “benzidine-based substances” while benzidine-based acid dyes and benzidine-based direct dyes are collectively referred to as “benzidine-based dyes.”

Benzidine-based dyes are anionic molecules that have relatively high water solubility (greater than 1 g/L) and are expected to dissociate at environmentally relevant pH levels. The majority of the benzidine-based acid dyes and benzidine-based direct dyes in this grouping were not reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities above 100 kg/year according to recent surveys conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999. When considering potential releases of benzidine-based dyes to the environment, it is expected that the chemistry of these substances may result in their partitioning to water, sediment and soil. Benzidine-based dyes have low experimental log octanol–water partition coefficients (Kow) and low fish bioconcentration factors (BCFs), indicating that these dyes are not likely to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms and do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. According to empirical and modelled data, benzidine-based dyes are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil) and are therefore considered to meet the persistence criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. However, they may degrade and transform to certain benzidine derivatives if they reach anaerobic environments. Based on aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity data (including both empirical and read-across data), benzidine-based dyes have the potential to cause harm to aquatic and terrestrial organisms at low concentrations. A conservative aquatic exposure analysis of the textile wet processing sector and a conservative terrestrial exposure analysis of the application of biosolids to land were done because such processes were anticipated to present the highest potential ecological risks related to the industrial release of these substances. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for benzidine-based dyes in aquatic and terrestrial environments were compared with predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for each compartment, and calculated risk quotients were all below “1” Considering all available lines of evidence with respect to the persistence, potential bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity, industrial uses and potential releases of the substances, it is proposed to conclude that benzidine-based dyes have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

Benzidine-based cationic indicators also have relatively high water solubility and are expected to dissociate at environmentally relevant pH levels. Neither of the two benzidine-based cationic indicators was reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities above 100 kg/year according to recent regulatory surveys. Given the high water solubility and affinity for negatively charged organic particles of the substances, potential releases would be expected to partition to water, sediment and soil. Since benzidine-based cationic indicators are charged, they have low experimental log Kow values. While BCFs were not available for these substances, they are similar enough in physical and chemical properties to benzidine-based dyes to allow for the conclusion that they are not likely to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms and do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Benzidine-based cationic indicators are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil) and are therefore considered to meet the persistence criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. However, benzidine-based cationic indicators may degrade and transform to certain benzidine derivatives if they reach anaerobic environments. Based on aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity data (including both empirical and read-across data), benzidine-based cationic indicators have the potential to cause harm to aquatic organisms at low concentrations. However, considering all lines of evidence for these two benzidine-based cationic indicators, particularly the lack of recent submissions regarding commercial activity in Canada, it is believed that they would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that these benzidine-based cationic indicators have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

The benzidine-based precursors Naphthol AS-BR and TCDB were assessed individually since their physical and chemical properties and chemical structures are very different. Models were used to predict most results, as no close analogues with relevant data could be found. Naphthol AS-BR is sparingly soluble and not expected to dissociate under environmentally relevant pH levels, so it is expected to reside mostly in soil or sediment if released to the environment. TCDB is moderately soluble and is expected to dissociate readily and stay in the water column or bind with particles, given its acidic character. Both benzidine-based precursors have moderate to high estimated log Kow values and moderate to high modelled aquatic BCFs. Despite some tendency for the substances to bioaccumulate, modelled data show that they may metabolize significantly. Therefore, TCDB and Naphthol AS-BR do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. These benzidine-based precursors are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil) and are therefore considered to meet the persistence criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Based on two sets of modelled aquatic toxicity data for acute and chronic endpoints, both TCDB and Naphthol AS-BR have the potential to cause harm to aquatic organisms at low concentrations (pivotal values <1 mg/L). Considering all lines of evidence, including the fact that TCDB and Naphthol AS-BR are not known to be in commerce in Canada, it is believed that these substances would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that these benzidine-based precursors have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada. However, there would be some cause for ecological concern if either TCDB or Naphthol AS-BR were found to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities greater than 100 kg/year, due to their high toxicity, persistence and potential for bioaccumulation.

The five benzidine derivatives assessed in this report are aromatic amines containing a biphenyl substructure. These substances were not reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities greater than 100 kg/year according to recent surveys. Benzidine derivatives are generally moderately soluble, have low to moderate log Kow values and will ionize at low pH levels. Based on these properties, as well as their high potential for binding to particulate matter and sediment, these substances are expected to be found in water, sediment and soil if released to the environment. Empirical and modelled data indicate that benzidine derivatives biodegrade slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil) and are therefore considered to meet the persistence criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Moderate to high water solubility, low to moderate log Kow values as well as a low empirical BCF for 3,3′-DMB indicate that benzidine derivatives will not bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms and do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Empirical and modelled data indicate that benzidine derivatives are moderately to highly toxic to aquatic organisms. However, given that these substances do not have the potential to be released to the environment in high volumes, as they were not reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities above 100 kg/year according to recent regulatory surveys, it is believed that benzidine derivatives would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that these five benzidine derivatives have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 42 substances considered in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. Based on currently available information, all of the substances considered in this assessment meet the persistence criteria as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. None of the substances considered in this assessment meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

With respect to human health risk assessment, a critical effect for certain benzidine-based substances is potential carcinogenicity via reductive cleavage of the azo bonds and release of aromatic amines, which can be converted to reactive intermediates through metabolic oxidation. Therefore, the health effects of the 37 benzidine-based substances are evaluated by examining their hazard potential (e.g. ability to undergo reductive cleavage), together with their potential for direct and prolonged exposure of the general population. Similarly, the five benzidine derivatives are evaluated for their hazard potential, together with their potential for direct and prolonged exposure of the general population.

Of the 37 benzidine-based substances, 29 are considered to have high hazard potential, based on potential genotoxicity and/or carcinogenicity: 26 benzidine-based substances that may release benzidine, 3,3′-dichlorobenzidine (3,3′-DCB), 3,3′-DMB or 3,3′-DMOB, and 3 benzidine-based substances that may release 2,2′-dimethylbenzidine (2,2′-DMB) or 2,2′-dichlorobenzidine (2,2′-DCB). Potential for direct and prolonged general population exposure was identified for one of the 37 benzidine-based substances, Acid Red 97. For all other substances, available information (including surveys conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 and information on uses pursuant to the Food and Drugs Act) did not identify direct and prolonged exposure for the general population of Canada. For all substances except Acid Red 97, given that direct and prolonged exposure of the general population is not expected, risk to human health is low. Although exposure to Acid Red 97 is expected for the general population of Canada, the hazard potential is considered low based on the review of available empirical data and analysis of structure–activity relationships indicating that the substance is not likely to be mutagenic. Therefore, the risk to the general population of Canada is considered to be low.

Three of the five Benzidine Derivatives, 3,3′-DMB, 3,3′-DMB·2HCl and 3,3′-DMOB, are considered to have high hazard potential based on potential genotoxicity and/or carcinogenicity. 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMOB are regulated in the European Union, and two European surveys, as well as a Japanese study, indicate that 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMOB are occasionally detected in imported textiles and leather products. Accordingly, these two benzidine derivatives could be present in imported products in Canada, as the Canadian textile market is predominantly composed of imported products. Preliminary Canadian monitoring data, however, did not identify these two benzidine derivatives in imported products. Overall, it is expected that exposure to these substances would be limited. These substances would not result in direct and prolonged skin contact, and risk to the general population is expected to be low. Exposure of the general population to the other two benzidine derivatives, TODI and 4N-TMB, is not expected, based on their specialized use as laboratory reagents and chemical precursors. Therefore, risk to the general population is not expected.

On the basis of the available data, it is proposed to conclude that 42 benzidine-based dyes and related substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the available information, it is proposed to conclude that the substances listed in the table below do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Considerations for follow-up

Although there is currently limited exposure in Canada, many substances included in this assessment are recognized for their high hazard both domestically and internationally. There may be concerns if uses resulting in exposure were to increase in Canada. Options on how best to monitor changes in the use profile of these substances such as monitoring of international activities or surveillance of the Canadian marketplace, will be investigated as the assessments for all of the aromatic azo and benzidine-based substance grouping are completed to ensure consistency across this grouping.

Substances that do not meet the criteria set out under paragraphs 64(a), 64(b) and 64(c) of CEPA 1999

CAS RN

Name/acronym

6548-30-7

Acid Red 128

6459-94-5

Acid Red 114

68318-35-4

Acid Black 209

68400-36-2

NAAHD

3701-40-4

Acid Red 99

89923-60-4

BADB

83221-63-0

NAADD

10169-02-5

Acid Red 97

6470-20-8

Acid Orange 56

573-58-0

Direct Red 28

6071-86-6

Direct Brown 95

2429-71-2

Direct Blue 8

2429-74-5

Direct Blue 15

6449-35-0

Direct Blue 151

67923-89-1

NAAH·3Li

70210-28-5

BABHS

71550-22-6

NADB·4Li

75659-73-3

NADB·2Li·2Na

75659-72-2

NADB·Li·3Na

75673-35-7

NADB·Li·Na

75673-34-6

NADB·2Li

75673-19-7

NAAH·2Li·Na

75673-18-6

NAAH·Li·2Na

75752-17-9

NADB·3Li·Na

72-57-1

Direct Blue 14

992-59-6

Direct Red 2

2150-54-1

Direct Blue 25

6420-22-0

Direct Blue 295

6420-06-0

Direct Violet 28

6548-29-4

Direct Red 46

71215-83-3

BAHSD

72252-59-6

BDAAH

6655-95-4

Direct Blue 158

1871-22-3

TDBD

298-83-9

TDBPD

93940-21-7

TCDB

91-92-9

Naphthol AS-BR

119-90-4

3,3′-DMOB

119-93-7

3,3′-DMB

612-82-8

3,3′-DMB-2HCl

91-97-4

4N-TMB

366-29-0

TODI

The draft Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of five diarylide yellow pigments specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) and subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas three of the five diarylide yellow pigments identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the five substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that the five substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the five substances at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of the Five Diarylide Yellow Pigments

Under sections 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of five structurally related diarylide yellow pigments, listed below. These substances constitute a subgroup of the aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substance grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP). Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered as priority substances under the CMP based on other human health concerns.

Five diarylide yellow pigments in the aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substance grouping

CAS RN (see footnote q)

DSL name

C.I. name

Substance identifier

5102-83-0

Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxo-

Pigment Yellow 13

PY13

5567-15-7 (see footnote 4)

Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[N-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-oxo-

Pigment Yellow 83

PY83

6358-85-6

Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[3-oxo-N-phenyl-

Pigment Yellow 12

PY12

78952-70-2

Butanamide, 2-[[3,3′-dichloro-4′-[[1-[[(2-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-oxopropyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxo-

N/A

CPAOBP

90268-24-9 (see footnote 5)

Pigment Yellow 176

Pigment Yellow 176

PY176

Abbreviations: CAS RN, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number; C.I., Colour Index; DSL, Domestic Substances List; N/A, not applicable.

These five diarylide yellow pigments are anthropogenic and are not expected to occur naturally in the environment. Four of the five substances have been found to be in commerce in Canada, through either manufacturing of the substances or industrial activities requiring their import. Some of the substances are also present in consumer products. No data on measured concentrations in the Canadian environment (or in other countries) have been identified for any of these substances.

Diarylide yellow pigments exist principally as particles in the nanometres or low micrometre size range, and the pigment powder is typically composed of primary particles (i.e. the crystal lattice of a pigment), aggregates and agglomerates. These pigments have very low solubility in water (generally in the low micrograms per litre range) and in octanol (below 1 mg/L); because of this, it was proposed that a quotient logarithm of the molar solute concentrations in octanol and in water [log (Soct/Sw)] would reasonably represent the logarithm of octanol-water partition coefficients (log Kow) for these pigments. The physical and chemical properties and the particulate nature of these substances suggest that soil and sediments would be the two major environmental media to which diarylide yellow pigments partition.

Experimental data indicate that under aerobic conditions, diarylide yellow pigments are expected to be persistent in water, soil and sediments.

The bioavailability of diarylide yellow pigments is expected to be very low based on the particulate character of these substances, their very low solubility in both water and octanol, and the high weight and large size of molecules of these substances. As a result, their potential to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms is expected to be low, which is corroborated by the results of bioconcentration studies.

Due to the limited bioavailability of diarylide yellow pigments, no effects were found at the concentration of 1 000 mg/kg soil or sediment (dry weight) in chronic soil and sediment toxicity studies. These pigments also showed no effect at saturation in acute and chronic aquatic ecotoxicity studies in which solvents were not used. Based on these studies, diarylide yellow pigments are not expected to be harmful to aquatic, soil-dwelling or sediment-dwelling organisms at low concentrations.

To evaluate potential exposures to diarylide yellow pigments in the environment, predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) were estimated. An industrial release scenario was chosen to evaluate the potential exposure to these substances. Predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) values for each relevant environmental compartment (soil, sediment and water) were calculated based on the experimental critical toxicity values (CTVs). Calculated risk quotient (PEC/PNEC) values were much lower than 1 for each environmental compartment (soil, sediment and water), indicating that harm to organisms in these media is not expected.

Based on the currently available information, all five diarylide yellow pigments considered in this assessment meet the persistence criteria as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. However, none of the five diarylide pigments considered in this assessment meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Based on the overall results of this assessment, it is proposed to conclude that none of the five diarylide yellow pigments (CAS RNs 5102-83-0, 5567-15-7, 6358-85-6, 78952-70-2 and 90268-24-9) considered in this assessment meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the human health assessment, general population exposure to these diarylide yellow pigments is primarily due to the use of consumer products, resulting in potential exposure by the inhalation (e.g. hairspray, spray paint) and oral routes (e.g. lipstick, ingestion of finger paint, and mouthing of painted toys). These substances are expected to exhibit very limited absorption and generally exhibit low toxicity by the oral and inhalation routes. The margins of exposure between the upper-bounding estimates of oral and dermal exposure from the use of consumer products and conservative effect levels are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the evaluated diarylide yellow pigments (CAS RNs 5102-83-0, 5567-15-7, 6358-85-6, 78952-70-2 and 90268-24-9) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is therefore proposed to conclude that the diarylide yellow pigments listed under CAS RNs 5102-83-0, 5567-15-7, 6358-85-6, 78952-70-2 and 90268-24-9 do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 119 substancesspecified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) and subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 114 of the 119 substances annexed hereby are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that subsection 81(3) thereof applies with respect to 17 of these substances,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the Ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment

As part of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), a section 71 notice for the first phase of the Domestic Substances List inventory update initiative was published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, in October 2009, to collect data on approximately 500 substances. As a result of this data collected, 140 substances were identified as candidates for rapid screening.

Following the application of a rapid screening approach to these 140 substances that were prioritized for assessment during the categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on and proposed conclusions for 119 of these substances pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999).

The majority of the 140 substances met the categorization criteria for Greatest Potential for Exposure (GPE) to humans or for persistence or bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to human or non-human organisms (PiT or BiT) under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999. Additional substances considered in this assessment had been identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity.

The substances included in this report were candidates for rapid screening because they were identified as being in commerce across Canada at a total of less than or equal to 1 000 kg/year according to information submitted pursuant to section 71 of CEPA 1999 regarding commercial activity in Canada under Phase One of the DSL Inventory Update. Thirty of the 140 substances addressed herein were part of a previous draft rapid screening assessment (Rapid Screening of Substances of Lower Concern), published for public comments on June 18, 2011. However, the conclusions for those 30 substances were not finalized at that time, as it had been determined that new information received through the Inventory Update may impact upon the conclusions. Therefore, these substances, and the new information, are considered in this draft report.

A rapid screening approach was applied that involved using conservative assumptions to identify substances that warrant further evaluation of their potential to cause harm to either human health or the environment, and those that are expected to have a low likelihood of causing harmful ecological or human health effects.

The ecological component of the rapid screening approach consisted of two main steps to identify substances that warrant further evaluation of their potential to cause harm. The first step involved applying different exposure scenarios using assumptions that are protective of the environment. The second step involved a mechanical process to identify whether or not a substance appears on any of a wide range of lists or in sources of information relating to ecological hazard or exposure. This step flagged substances that have been identified by domestic or international initiatives as possibly being of greater concern due to their ecological hazard properties, or elevated potential for environmental release.

The human health component of the rapid screening approach consisted of a process to determine whether the substance warrants further assessment from a human health perspective. A key element of the characterization of potential risk for human health is determination of the potential for exposure to the general population. Substances reported to be in commerce in Canada at less than or equal to 1 000 kg/year are considered to warrant further assessment if there is evidence of direct exposure (e.g. exposure from products or processed foods) of the general population in Canada. If the potential for exposure is considered to be negligible for a substance, it is proposed to conclude that that substance is unlikely to cause harm to human health at current levels of exposure.

In total, 21 substances (10 identified for ecological and human health considerations, 10 identified for human health considerations only, and 1 identified for ecological considerations only) were identified as requiring further assessment (Appendix II). For the remaining 119 substances (Appendix I), this rapid screening approach indicated that current use patterns and quantities in commerce are unlikely to result in concerns for organisms or the broader integrity of the environment, or for human health in Canada. All in-commerce substances had calculated generic aquatic exposure values below the level of concern. Furthermore, application of the mechanical filters did not identify any additional ecological concerns. From a human health perspective, indirect or direct exposure to the general population from environmental media (air, water, soil) to these 119 substances is expected to be negligible and the substances are therefore unlikely to cause harm to human health at current levels of exposure.

As these 119 substances are listed on the Domestic Substances List, they are not subject to notification under the New Substance Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). However, given the hazardous properties of 17 of these substances, there is concern that new activities that have not been identified or assessed under CEPA 1999 could lead to these substances meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act. Therefore, it is recommended to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that subsection 81(3) of the Act applies with respect to each of these substances, so that any significant new activity is declared and undergoes ecological and human health risk assessment before the substance is imported, manufactured or used for the significant new activity.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the results of this screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 119 substances listed in Appendix I do not meet any of the criteria under section 64 of CEPA 1999, since they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends, or that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

The draft Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

APPENDIX I

Substances Identified as not Meeting the Criteria under Section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS RN (see footnote 6)

DSL name
(see footnote 7)

56-49-5

Benz[j]aceanthrylene, 1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-

78-13-7

Silicic acid (H4SiO4), tetrakis(2-ethylbutyl) ester

86-74-8

9H-Carbazole

87-62-7

Benzenamine, 2,6-dimethyl-

99-09-2

Benzenamine, 3-nitro-

106-92-3 (see footnote 8)

Oxirane, [(2-propenyloxy)methyl]-

108-44-1

Benzenamine, 3-methyl-

112-76-5

Octadecanoyl chloride

120-95-6

Phenol, 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-

121-19-7

Arsonic acid, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)-

127-85-5

Arsonic acid, (4-aminophenyl)-, monosodium salt

150-68-5 (see footnote 9)

Urea, N′-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-

507-28-8

Arsonium, tetraphenyl-, chloride

543-90-8

Acetic acid, cadmium salt

553-72-0

Benzoic acid, zinc salt

554-00-7

Benzenamine, 2,4-dichloro-

556-52-5 (see footnote 10)

Oxiranemethanol

557-09-5

Octanoic acid, zinc salt

557-21-1

Zinc cyanide (Zn(CN)2)

557-28-8

Propanoic acid, zinc salt

603-32-7

Arsine, triphenyl-

637-03-6

Arsine, oxophenyl-

1153-05-5

Arsine oxide, triphenyl-

1191-79-3

Octadecanoic acid, barium cadmium salt (4:1:1)

2191-10-8

Octanoic acid, cadmium salt

2223-93-0

Octadecanoic acid, cadmium salt

2605-44-9

Dodecanoic acid, cadmium salt

3026-22-0

Benzoic acid, cadmium salt

4167-05-9

Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, cadmium salt

4454-16-4

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, nickel(2++) salt

4980-54-5

Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, zinc salt

4995-91-9

Octanoic acid, nickel(2++) salt

5530-30-3

Phenol, 4-butyl-2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-

6362-80-7

Benzene, 1,1′-(1,1-dimethyl-3-methylene-1,3-propanediyl)bis-

6427-86-7

Hexadecanoic acid, cadmium salt

7580-31-6

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, nickel salt

7647-18-9

Antimony chloride (SbCl5)

7779-86-4

Dithionous acid, zinc salt (1:1)

10196-67-5

Tetradecanoic acid, cadmium salt

10468-30-1

9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, cadmium salt

10595-60-5

1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(1,3-dimethylbutylidene)-N′-[2-[(1,3-dimethylbutylidene)amino]ethyl]-

11071-15-1

Antimonate(2-), bis[µ-[2,3-dihydroxybutanedioato(4-)-O1,O2:O3,O4]]di-, dipotassium, stereoisomer

11112-10-0

Antimony sodium oxide

13438-45-4

Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, zinc salt

13497-94-4

Silver vanadium oxide (AgVO3)

14024-63-6

Zinc, bis(2,4-pentanedionato-O,O′)-, (T-4)-

14239-68-0

Cadmium, bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-, (T-4)-

14263-89-9

Benzenediazonium, 4-chloro-2-nitro-, tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

14516-71-3

Nickel, (1-butanamine)[[2,2′-thiobis[4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenolato]](2-)-O,O′,S]-

14639-97-5

Zincate(2-), tetrachloro-, diammonium, (T-4)-

14639-98-6

Zincate(3-), pentachloro-, triammonium

15317-78-9

Nickel, bis[bis(2-methylpropyl)carbamodithioato-S,S′]-, (SP-4-1)-

15521-65-0

Nickel, bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-, (SP-4-1)-

15337-60-7

Dodecanoic acid, barium cadmium salt

15751-00-5

Nickel(2++), hexakis(1H-imidazole-N3)-, dichloride, (OC-6-11)-

15874-52-9

Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester, antimony(3++) salt

18015-76-4
(see footnote 11)

Methanaminium, N-[4-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]phenylmethylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-N-methyl-, ethanedioate

19900-65-3
(see footnote 12)

Benzenamine, 4,4′-methylenebis[2-ethyl-

20437-10-9

Nickel, [[1,1′-[1,2-phenylenebis(nitrilomethylidyne)]bis[2-naphthalenolato]](2-)-N,N′,O,O′]-, (SP-4-2)-

24345-02-6

Benzenesulfinic acid, 4-methyl-, zinc salt

25168-05-2

Benzene, chloromethyl-

25537-17-1

Phosphonic acid, (1-hydroxyethylidene)bis-, zinc salt

25640-78-2

1,1′-Biphenyl, (1-methylethyl)-

27251-75-8

1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, triisooctyl ester

27288-44-4

Acetic acid, mercapto-, isooctyl ester, antimony(3++) salt

27342-69-4

Cyclotetrasiloxane, tetraethenyltetramethyl-

27574-34-1

Nickel, [[2,2′-thiobis[4-(1,1,3,3tetramethylbutyl)phenolato]](2-)-O,O′,S]-

28214-91-7

Naphthalenesulfonic acid, dinonyl-, lithium salt

29204-84-0

Nickel, bis[2,3-bis(hydroxyimino)-N-phenylbutanamidato-N2,N3]-

30172-67-9

Benzene, bis(phenylmethyl)-

30260-72-1

Benzenesulfonic acid, dodecyl(sulfophenoxy)-

30947-30-9

Phosphonic acid, [[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]methyl]-, monoethyl ester, nickel(2++) salt (2:1)

33684-80-9

Methanesulfonic acid, zinc salt

38656-51-8

Benzenediazonium, 2,5-diethoxy-4-[(4-methylphenyl)thio]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

39455-80-6

Ammonium sodium vanadium oxide

42405-40-3

Zinc, bis[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2-hydroxybenzoato-O1,O2]-, (T-4)-

43126-83-6

tert-Dodecanethiol, silver(1++) salt

49757-42-8

Benzene, 1,1′,1″-(chloromethylidyne)tris[4-methoxy-

50594-66-6

Benzoic acid, 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitro-

50851-34-8

Benzene, dimethylbis(phenylmethyl)-

51731-04-5

Octadecanoic acid, zinc salt, basic

52108-54-0

Phosphoric acid, 2-ethylhexyl ester, zinc salt

52434-90-9

1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, 1,3,5-tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)-

52572-38-0

Benzenediazonium, 3-methyl-4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-, trichlorozincate(1-)

55700-14-6

Cyclohexanebutanoic acid, cadmium salt

57866-49-6

Lignosulfonic acid, zinc salt

60580-61-2

1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, 5-nitro-, zinc salt (1:1)

61789-34-2

Naphthenic acids, cadmium salts

61951-96-0

Neodecanoic acid, cadmium salt

63568-30-9

Naphthalenesulfonic acid, diisononyl-, lead(2++) salt

63589-47-9

Phenoxazin-5-ium, 3,7-bis(diethylamino)-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

65046-95-9

Zinc, bis(2-methoxybenzoato-O1,O2)-, (T-4)-

68092-45-5

Benzoic acid, 3-methyl-, cadmium salt

68092-46-6

Benzoic acid, 3-methyl-, zinc salt

68442-22-8

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl and iso-Bu) esters, zinc salts

68478-53-5

Cadmium, benzoate p-tert-butylbenzoate complexes

68512-49-2

Cadmium zinc sulfide ((Cd,Zn)S), copper chloride-doped

68540-77-2

1-Anthracenediazonium, 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-, chloride, compd. with zinc chloride (ZnCl2)

68611-72-3

Zinc, C6-19-branched carboxylate naphthenate complexes

68815-09-8

Naphthenic acids, vanadium salts

68988-46-5

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(iso-Bu and isooctyl and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

68988-62-5

Zinc, benzoate p-tert-butylbenzoate complexes

69121-20-6

Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, cadmium salt (2:1)

69304-37-6

Disiloxane, 1,3-dichloro-1,1,3,3-tetrakis(1-methylethyl)-

71889-22-0

Nickel, [µ-(piperazine-N1:N4)]bis[3-[1-[(4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-1-oxo-1H-isoindol-3-yl)hydrazono]ethyl]-2,4(1H,3H)-quinolinedionato(2-)]di-

72102-51-3

3H-Indolium, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-1,3,3-trimethyl-, trichlorozincate(1-)

72333-14-3

Benzenediazonium, 2-chloro-5-(4-chlorophenoxy)-4-(diethylamino)-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

73003-83-5

Arsonium, tetraphenyl-, chloride, compd. with hydrochloric acid (1:1)

77245-35-3

Nickel, bis[[didecyl (1,2-dicyano-1,2-ethenediyl)bis[carbamato]](2-)]-

84370-79-6

tert-Decanoic acid, zinc salt

85203-81-2

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, zinc salt, basic

85298-60-8

Zinc, bis(diisononylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-

85298-61-9

Nickel, bis(diisononylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-

92221-02-8

Vanadium, tetrachloro(2-pyridinamine-N1)-

101747-77-7

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(iso-Bu and iso-Pr and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

114792-68-6

Benzene, trimethylbis(phenylmethyl)-

125275-86-7

Nickelate(1-), (formato-O)[sulfato(2-)-O]-, hydrogen

125275-87-8

Nickelate(1-), (acetato-O)[sulfato(2-)-O]-, hydrogen

125494-58-8

Zinc, C9-28-neocarboxylate 2-ethylhexanoate naphthenate complexes

APPENDIX II

Substances Identified as Requiring Further Assessment

CAS RN (see footnote 13)

DSL name
(see footnote 14)

62-44-2

Acetamide, N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-

77-47-4

1,3-Cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,5-hexachloro-

87-66-1

1,2,3-Benzenetriol

95-55-6

Phenol, 2-amino-

288-88-0

1H-1,2,4-Triazole

333-41-5

Phosphorothioic acid, O,O-diethyl O-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester

630-20-6

Ethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-

632-99-5

Benzenamine, 4-[(4-aminophenyl)(4-imino-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methyl]-2-methyl-, monohydrochloride

1314-22-3

Zinc peroxide (Zn(O2))

2223-95-2

Octadecanoic acid, nickel(2++) salt

2475-45-8

9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4,5,8-tetraamino-

4035-89-6

Imidodicarbonic diamide, N,N′,2-tris(6-isocyanatohexyl)-

7789-36-8

Magnesium borate

7803-55-6

Vanadate (VO31-), ammonium

15337-18-5

Zinc, bis(dipentylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-, (T-4)-

24308-84-7

Benzenesulfinic acid, zinc salt

24887-06-7

Zinc, bis(hydroxymethanesulfinato-OS,O1)-, (T-4)-

28629-66-5

Zinc, bis(O,O-diisooctyl phosphorodithioato-S,S′)-

37300-23-5

C.I. Pigment Yellow 36

68527-01-5

Alkenes, C12-30 α-, bromo chloro

73398-89-7

Xanthylium, 3,6-bis(diethylamino)-9-[2-(methoxycarbonyl)phenyl]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

Notice seeking comments on possible trade retaliation action against the United States in response to that country’s failure to comply with the World Trade Organization ruling on certain country of origin labelling requirements

Background

On June 29, 2012, the World Trade Organization (WTO) Appellate Body upheld an earlier WTO Panel ruling that United States (U.S.) Country of Origin Labelling (COOL) requirements under their 2008 Farm Bill discriminate against Canadian (and Mexican) livestock and violate their WTO obligations. The WTO gave the U.S. until May 23, 2013, to comply with its decision.

On May 23, 2013, the United States introduced regulatory changes to their existing COOL requirements. Canada does not agree that these changes bring the United States into compliance with their WTO obligations and intends to pursue a WTO compliance panel. If it is determined that these changes do not comply with the WTO decision, the United States can negotiate with Canada to provide compensation. If agreement cannot be reached on compensation, Canada will request authority from the WTO to retaliate to a level equivalent to damages resulting from COOL requirements.

The intent of these consultations is to ensure that Canada is prepared to react. Authority to impose any retaliatory measure would require the successful completion of all related WTO proceedings, which is not expected before the last quarter of 2014, at the earliest.

Invitation to submit views

If and when authorized by the WTO, Canada intends to levy a 100% surtax on imports of selected products from the United States. Should Canada be authorized to retaliate, the products subject to a surtax would be drawn from the list in Table 1, and would reflect comments received from Canadians. The list of products outlined at the tariff heading, tariff subheading, or tariff item level, should be read in conjunction with the Schedule to Canada’s Customs Tariff, which can be accessed at http://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/trade-commerce/tariff-tarif/menu-eng.html. Any surtax would be rescinded in the event of U.S. compliance with their WTO obligations or in the event of a negotiated solution.

Interested parties are invited to submit comments in writing to the following address by no later than September 30, 2013: COOL Retaliation Consultations, International Trade Policy Division, Department of Finance, L’Esplanade Laurier, 14th Floor, East Tower, 140 O’Connor Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G5, 613-992-6761 (fax), COOL-EPO@fin.gc.ca (email).

TABLE 1

Tariff heading, sub-heading, or item

Description
(see footnote 15)

01.02

Live bovine animals

01.03

Live swine

02.01

Meat of bovine animals, fresh or chilled

02.02

Meat of bovine animals, frozen

02.03

Meat of swine, fresh, chilled, or frozen

0207.13.10

Cuts of offal, fresh or chilled of spent fowl

0406.90

Cheese, not including the following: fresh (unripened or uncured) cheese, whey cheese or curd; grated or powdered; processed cheese; blue-veined cheese or cheese containing veins produced by Penicillium roqueforti

0808.10

Apples, fresh

0809.29

Cherries, other than sour cherries (Prunus cerasus)

0812.10

Cherries, provisionally preserved (unsuitable in that state for immediate consumption)

10.05

Corn (maize)

1006.30.00

Semi-milled or wholly milled rice, whether or not polished or glazed

1602.32.11

Prepared or preserved — prepared meals of spent fowl; prepared meals of specially defined mixtures

1602.32.92

Prepared or preserved — specially defined mixtures, other than in cans or glass jars; spent fowl other than in cans or glass jars

1602.49

Prepared or preserved swine cuts, other than ham and cuts thereof, other than shoulder and cuts thereof

1602.50

Prepared or preserved meat of bovine animals

1702.20.00

Maple sugar and maple syrup

1702.40.00

Glucose and glucose syrup, containing in the dry state at least 20% but less than 50% by weight of fructose, excluding invert sugar

1702.60.00

Other fructose and fructose syrup, containing in the dry state more than 50% by weight of fructose, excluding invert sugar

1806.20

Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa — preparations in blocks, slabs or bars weighing more than 2 kg or in liquid, paste, powder, granular or other bulk form in containers or immediate packings, of a content exceeding 2 kg

1806.90

Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa — chocolate ice cream mix or ice milk mix; chocolates; chocolate coated nuts and other confectionery

19.02

Pasta, whether or not cooked or stuffed (with meat or other substances) or otherwise prepared, such as spaghetti, macaroni, noodles, lasagna, gnocchi, ravioli, cannelloni; couscous, whether or not prepared

19.04

Prepared foods obtained by the swelling or roasting of cereals or cereal products (for example, corn flakes); cereals (other than maize [corn]) in grain form or in the form of flakes or other worked grains (except flour, groats and meal), pre-cooked or otherwise prepared, not elsewhere specified or included

19.05

Bread, pastry, cakes, biscuits and other bakers’ wares, whether or not containing cocoa; communion wafers, empty cachets of a kind suitable for pharmaceutical use, sealing wafers, rice paper and similar products

2004.10.00

Potatoes, prepared or preserved otherwise than by vinegar or acetic acid, frozen, other than products of heading 20.06

2009.11

Orange juice, frozen

2103.20

Tomato ketchup and other tomato sauces

22.04

Wine of fresh grapes, including fortified wines; grape must other than that of heading 20.09

2207.20

Ethyl alcohol and other spirits, denatured, of any strength

2940.00.00

Sugars, chemically pure, other than sucrose, lactose, maltose, glucose and fructose; sugar ethers, sugar acetals and sugar esters, and their salts, other than products of heading 29.37, 29.38 or 29.39

3504.00

Peptones and their derivatives; other protein substances and their derivatives, not elsewhere specified or included; hide powder, whether or not chromed

71.13

Articles of jewellery and parts thereof, of precious metal or of metal clad with precious metal

7306.40.00

Other tubes, pipes and hollow profiles, welded, of circular cross-section, of stainless steel

7321.90

Parts of stoves, ranges, grates, cookers (including those with subsidiary boilers for central heating), barbecues, braziers, gas-rings, plate warmers and similar non-electric domestic appliances, and parts thereof, of iron or steel

7326.11.00

Grinding balls and similar articles for mills, forged or stamped, but not further worked, of iron or steel

9401.30

Swivel seats with variable height adjustment

9403.30.00

Wooden furniture of a kind used in offices

9404.29.00

Mattresses of materials other than cellular rubber or plastics, whether or not covered

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Residential indoor air quality guideline for naphthalene

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of the issuance of a residential indoor air quality guideline for naphthalene. The following exposure limit is recommended:

Exposure period

Concentration

µg/m3

ppb

Long-term

10

1.9

This exposure limit is protective against potential cancer risks of long-term exposure to naphthalene via inhalation. The concentrations of naphthalene in most homes in Canada are well below this limit.

April 18, 2013

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR QUALITY GUIDELINE NAPHTHALENE
Physical and chemical properties

Naphthalene is a two ring hydrocarbon which forms a white crystalline powder. Naphthalene has a distinct and easily detectable odour (mothball odour), with mean and lowest air odour thresholds of 0.44 ± 9.95 and 0.01 mg/m3, respectively (Amoore and Hautala, 1983; Devos et al., 1990). Naphthalene is a by-product of combustion of biomass and fossil fuels (Jia and Batterman, 2010).

Molecular formula

C10H8

Molecular weight

128.17 g/mol

Vapour pressure

0.082 mm Hg at 25°C

Boiling point

217.9°C

Conversion factor

1 ppm = 5.24 mg/m3

Sources and concentrations in indoor environments

Naphthalene is present at detectable levels in residential environments and can arise from a wide array of sources, including consumer and building products such as paints, coatings, stains, solvents, adhesives, sealing products, flooring, carpeting, air fresheners, and pest control products (to kill moths and larvae) [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 2005; Health Canada, 2008].

As a product of incomplete combustion, naphthalene is emitted in cigarette smoke, during cooking, and from kerosene space heaters and wood stoves (Charles, Batterman and Jia, 2007; Moir et al., 2008; Jia and Batterman, 2010). Naphthalene in exhaust from vehicles and gas-powered equipment and in vapours from stored petroleum products in attached garages may infiltrate into occupied areas of the home (Marr et al., 1999; Schauer et al., 2002). Infiltration of outdoor air may also be a source of naphthalene in indoor air; however, ambient concentrations are generally lower than those found indoors.

Canadians’ exposure to naphthalene is attributed predominantly to indoor air, because indoor air levels generally exceed ambient air levels, and because of the greater time spent indoors. Inhalation of indoor air was identified as the greatest source of naphthalene exposure, accounting for more than 95.0% of the total daily intake across all age groups (Government of Canada, 2008).

Median concentrations of naphthalene measured in Canadian residences range from 0.2 to 1.6 µg/m3 and average concentrations from 0.3 to 6.3 µg/m3 (Fellin and Otson, 1994; Sanderson and Farant, 2004; Zhu et al., 2005; Héroux et al., 2008; Health Canada, 2010a; Health Canada, 2010b; Health Canada, 2012a; Health Canada, 2012b). Peak concentrations can reach values one to two orders of magnitude higher.

Health effects

Naphthalene has been shown to cause tissue damage and cancer in the nasal passages and lungs of rats and mice exposed to high levels in laboratory studies.

It is considered a possible carcinogen for humans, although there is not yet sufficient evidence to prove it causes cancer in humans. Based on its potential cancer risk, and the margin between levels to which Canadians might be exposed and the critical effect level for non-cancer effects, naphthalene has been determined to meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999).

In controlled exposure studies, Fischer 344 rats exposed to naphthalene for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 105 weeks showed increased nasal lesions at concentrations ranging from 52 to 314 mg/m3 (National Toxicology Program, 2000; Abdo et al., 2001). There are data that indicate a potential progression of effects from tissue damage in the nasal cavities and lungs potentially leading to the development of cancer.

There are data indicating a continuum of effects for acute, subchronic and chronic cytotoxicity and cancer in the rat nasal epithelium; subacute data are lacking for the mouse nose, although similar cytotoxic effects are seen acutely and chronically (National Toxicology Program, 2000). There is progression of acute to chronic lesions in the mouse lung; however, the lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs) for pulmonary cytotoxicity in the mouse are higher than the rat nasal no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) / lowest observed adverse effect level (West et al., 2001; Dodd et al., 2010).

There have also been reports of naphthalene exposure, from breathing it in, swallowing it or contact with skin, causing haemolytic anemia (a breakdown of red blood cells) [Dawson, Thayer and Desforges, 1958; Zinkham and Childs, 1958; Valaes, Doxiadis and Fessas, 1963; Naiman and Kosoy, 1964; Shannon and Buchanan, 1982; Ojwang, Ahmed-Jushuf and Abdullah, 1985; Ostlere, Amos and Wass, 1988; Owa et al., 1993; Santucci and Shah, 2000; Trevisan, Di Schio and Pieno, 2001; Lim, Poulose and Tan, 2009]. These reports primarily, but not always, involve people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (a genetic deficiency that causes them to lack a specific enzyme that protects red-blood cells from naphthalene). Since there is no regular screening for this genetic condition, and there are no symptoms prior to exposure, people are unlikely to know that they have this genetic condition.

Prevention of acute and chronic nasal cytotoxicity is considered likely to prevent tumour development on chronic exposure. A short-term indoor air exposure limit was not considered necessary as a short-term reference concentration would be of a similar order of magnitude to the long-term reference concentration. Risk management measures to limit naphthalene exposure are the same for acute or chronic exposure.

Assessment under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

Health Canada, in consultation with provincial and territorial health departments, developed a priority list of indoor air contaminants that were national in scope and required government action. Through this process, naphthalene was identified as an indoor air priority pollutant.

In 2008, under the Chemicals Management Plan, a screening assessment of naphthalene was published (Health Canada, 2008). On the basis of the carcinogenicity of naphthalene, and the margin between levels to which Canadians might be exposed and the critical effect level for non-cancer effects as well as the potential inadequacy of the margin between the upper–bounding concentration of naphthalene in indoor air and the critical effect level for non-cancer effects, the screening assessment concluded that naphthalene may be entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health. Naphthalene was therefore determined to meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Residential indoor air quality guideline for naphthalene

A long-term exposure limit for naphthalene in indoor air was derived based on the LOAEL of 52 mg/m3 from studies of rats exposed to naphthalene and screened for nasal lesions (National Toxicology Program, 2000). This value was then adjusted to account for the difference in the duration of exposure in the study compared to in a residence (i.e. from 6 hours/day ´ 5 days/week to 24 hours/day ´ 7 days/week). A total uncertainty factor of 1 000 was applied to the LOAEL to account for database deficiencies, interspecies and intra-individual variability (10 ´ 10 ´ 10 = 1 000).

The recommended long-term maximum exposure limit for naphthalene is presented in the table below, along with the critical health effects on which it was based. Exposure to indoor air concentrations above these limits may result in potential health effects. The minimum recommended sampling time is 24 hours.

Residential maximum exposure limit for naphthalene

Exposure period

Concentration

Critical Effects

µg/m3

ppb

Long-term

10

1.9

  • Nasal lesions in rats
References

Abdo, K. M., Grumbein, S., Chou, B. J. and Herbert, R. (2001) “Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Study in F344 Rats Following 2 Years of Whole-Body Exposure to Naphthalene Vapors.” Inhalation Toxicology, 13(10), 931–950.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. (2005) Toxicological Profile for Naphthalene, 1-Methylnaphthalene, and 2-Methylnaphthalene, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Atlanta, GA.

Amoore, J. E. and Hautala, E. (1983) “Odor As an Aid to Chemical Safety: Odor Thresholds Compared with Threshold Limit Values and Volatilities for 214 Industrial Chemicals in Air and Water Dilution.” Journal of Applied Toxicology, 3(6), 272–290.

Charles, S. M., Batterman, S. A. and Jia, C. (2007) “Composition and Emissions of VOCs in Main- and Side-Stream Smoke of Research Cigarettes.” Atmospheric Environment, 41(26), 5371–5384.

Dawson, J. P., Thayer, W. W. and Desforges, J. F. (1958) “Acute Hemolytic Anemia in the Newborn Infant Due to Naphthalene Poisoning: Report of Two Cases, With Investigations Into the Mechanism of the Disease.” Blood, 13(12), 1113–1125.

Devos, M., Patte, F., Rouault, J., Laffort, P. and Van Gemert, L. J. (1990) Standardized Human Olfactory Thresholds, IRL Press, Oxford, as cited in WHO (2010).

Dodd, D. E., Gross, E. A., Miller, R. A. and Wong, B. A. (2010) “Nasal Olfactory Epithelial Lesions in F344 and SD Rats Following 1- and 5-Day Inhalation Exposure to Naphthalene Vapor.” International Journal of Toxicology, 29(2), 175–184.

Fellin, P. and Otson, R. (1994) “Assessment of the Influence of Climatic Factors on Concentration Levels of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Canadian Homes.” Atmospheric Environment, 28(22), 3581–3586.

Health Canada. (2008) Substance Profile for The Challenge — Naphthalene, CAS No. 91-20-3.

Health Canada. (2010a) Regina Indoor Air Quality Study (2007): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compounds Sampling.

Health Canada. (2010b) Windsor Exposure Assessment Study (2005–2006): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compounds Sampling.

Health Canada. (2012a) Edmonton Indoor Air Quality Study (2010): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary (unpublished).

Health Canada. (2012b) Halifax Indoor Air Quality Study (2009): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary.

Héroux, M. È., Gauvin, D., Gilbert, N. L., Guay, M., Dupuis, G., Legris, M. and Lévesque, B. (2008) “Housing Characteristics and Indoor Concentrations of Selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Quebec City, Canada.” Indoor and Built Environment, 17(2), 128–137.

Jia, C. and Batterman, S. (2010) “A Critical Review of Naphthalene Sources and Exposures Relevant to Indoor and Outdoor Air.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 7(7), 2903–2939.

Lim, H. C., Poulose, V. and Tan, H. H. (2009) “Acute Naphthalene Poisoning Following the Non-Accidental Ingestion of Mothballs.” Singapore Medical Journal, 50(8).

Marr, L. C., Kirchstetter, T. W., Harley, R. A., Miguel, A. H., Hering, S. V. and Hammond, S. K. (1999) “Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Motor Vehicle Fuels and Exhaust Emissions.” Environmental Science and Technology, 33(18), 3091–3099.

Moir, D., Rickert, W. S., Levasseur, G., Larose, Y., Maertens, R., White, P. and Desjardins, S. (2008) “A Comparison of Mainstream and Sidestream Marijuana and Tobacco Cigarette Smoke Produced Under Two Machine Smoking Conditions.” Chemical Research in Toxicology, 21(2), 494–502.

Naiman, J. L. and Kosoy, M. H. (1964) “Red Cell Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency — A Newly Recognized Cause of Neonatal Jaundice and Kernicterus in Canada.” Canadian Medical Association Journal, 91(24), 1243–1249.

National Toxicology Program. (2000) NTP Technical Report on the Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Naphthalene (CAS No. 91-20-3) in F344/N Rats (Inhalation Studies), Rockville, MD.

Ojwang, P. J., Ahmed-Jushuf, I. H. and Abdullah, M. S. (1985) “Naphthalene Poisoning Following Ingestion of Moth Balls: Case Report.” East African Medical Journal, 62(1), 71–73.

Ostlere, L., Amos, R. and Wass, J. A. H. (1988) “Haemolytic Anaemia Associated With Ingestion of Naphthalene-Containing Anointing Oil.” Postgraduate Medical Journal, 64(752), 444–446.

Owa, J. A., Izedonmwen, O. E., Ogundaini, A. O. and Ogungbamila, F. O. (1993) “Quantitative Analysis of 1-Naphthol in Urine of Neonates Exposed to Mothballs: the Value in Infants With Unexplained Anaemia.” African Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, 22(1), 71–76, as cited in U.S. EPA (2004, draft).

Sanderson, E. G. and Farant, J. P. (2004) “Indoor and Outdoor Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Residences Surrounding a Söerberg Aluminum Smelter in Canada.” Environmental Science and Technology, 38(20), 5350–5356.

Santucci, K. and Shah, B. (2000) “Association of Naphthalene With Acute Hemolytic Anemia.” Academic Emergency Medicine, 7(1), 42–47.

Schauer, J. J., Kleeman, M. J., Cass, G. R. and Simoneit, B. R. T. (2002) “Measurement of Emissions from Air Pollution Sources. 5. C1–C32 Organic Compounds From Gasoline-Powered Motor Vehicles.” Environmental Science and Technology, 36(6), 1169–1180.

Shannon, K. and Buchanan, G. R. (1982) “Severe Hemolytic Anemia in Black Children With Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.” Pediatrics, 70(3), 364–369.

Trevisan, A., Di Schio, M. R. and Pieno, M. (2001) “Haemolytic Anaemia After Oral Self-Giving of Naphthalene-Containing Oil.” Journal of Applied Toxicology, 21(5), 393–396.

Valaes, T., Doxiadis, S. A. and Fessas, P. (1963) “Acute Hemolysis Due to Naphthalene Inhalation.” The Journal of Pediatrics, 63(5), 904–915, as cited in ATSDR (2005).

West, J. A. A., Pakenham, G., Morin, D., Fleschner, C. A., Buckpitt, A. R. and Plopper, C. G. (2001) “Inhaled Naphthalene Causes Dose Dependent Clara Cell Cytotoxicity in Mice but Not in Rats.” Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 173(2), 114–119.

Zhu, J., Newhook, R., Marro, L. and Chan, C. C. (2005) “Selected Volatile Organic Compounds in Residential Air in the City of Ottawa, Canada.” Environmental Science and Technology, 39(11), 3964–3971.

Zinkham, W. H. and Childs, B. (1958) “A Defect of Glutathione Metabolism in Erythrocytes From Patients With a NaphthaleneInduced Hemolytic Anemia.” Pediatrics, 22(3), 461–471.

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-001-13 — Release of Issue 1 of RSS-244

Notice is hereby given that Industry Canada is releasing the following document:

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-244, Issue 1, Medical Devices Operating in the Band 413-457 MHz, which sets out the minimum requirements for the certification of transmitters and receivers used in radiocommunication systems that are part of Medical Micropower Networks (MMNs). MMNs operate in the bands 413-419 MHz, 426-432 MHz, 438-444 MHz and 451-457 MHz.
General information

RSS-244, Issue 1, will come into force as of the date of publication of this notice.

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC). The equipment and radio apparatus standards lists will be amended to reflect the above-mentioned change.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca), Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, 19th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions received by the close of the comment period will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

June 15, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-005-13 — Release of Issue 4 of ICES-004

Notice is hereby given that Industry Canada is releasing the following document:

  • Interference-Causing Equipment Standard ICES-004, Issue 4, Alternating Current High Voltage Power Systems, which sets out the technical requirements for alternating high voltage power systems as well as advises concerned parties of the technical criteria upon which determinations regarding harmful interference complaints involving such interference-causing equipment will generally be based.
General information

ICES-004, Issue 4, will come into force as of the date of publication of this notice.

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC). The equipment and radio apparatus standards lists will be amended to reflect the above-mentioned change.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca), Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, 19th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions received by the close of the comment period will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

June 15, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[24-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION

President and Chief Executive Officer (full-time position)

Salary range: $363,800–$428,000

Location: Ottawa, Ontario

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is a Crown corporation which reports to the Parliament of Canada through the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and is governed by a board of directors that is accountable for the overall stewardship of the Corporation. CMHC has been helping to house Canadians for over 65 years, and is committed to housing quality, affordability and choice for Canadians.

With its head office in Ottawa, the Corporation has five regional business centres and other local offices across Canada. The Corporation employs approximately 2 100 employees. CMHC ranks as the largest federal Crown corporation with $13 billion in annual revenues and approximately $293 billion in assets.

The President and CEO is accountable for providing vision, strategic guidance, oversight and leadership in developing and delivering both commercial and appropriations-based programs to achieve Canada’s housing strategy. He/she also provides recommendations to the Minister regarding Canada’s national housing policy and stewardship of CMHC’s resources, consistent with the expectations of the organization’s governing bodies, clients and stakeholders, so as to ensure that CMHC fulfills its role as an effective instrument in achieving the Government’s public policy objectives in housing.

The ideal candidate will possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study such as commerce, accounting, law, economics, or a professional accounting designation (CA, CGA, CFA, CMA). The position requires the incumbent to possess significant senior level management experience in a large private and/or public organization, including the management of human and financial resources, and experience leading the day-to-day operations of a multi-disciplinary and decentralized organization.

The qualified candidate has proven senior level decision-making experience with respect to complex and sensitive issues; demonstrated leadership experience, including motivating employees to reach corporate objectives; a proven record of building and maintaining productive and effective multipartite relationships with partner organizations and diverse stakeholders; and previous experience working with a board of directors and senior Government officials.

The successful candidate possesses knowledge of the financial management requirements, particularly risk management, of a large financial services organization, as well as sound knowledge of housing and financial markets, and their role in macroeconomic policy and CMHC’s market activities. The position requires an understanding of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act, the National Housing Act and the Financial Administration Act, and an understanding of the Government’s social, economic and fiscal policies and priorities, and its role in housing. Knowledge of CMHC’s housing policy mandate and activities, and of land and asset management, is also required.

The successful candidate will be able to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Government and industry partners and stakeholders as well as possess the ability to lead the organization in a manner that achieves the strategic objectives of the Corporation and delivers high quality service in a cost-effective manner. Strong analytical, problem-solving and decision-making abilities are preferred, as is the ability to provide the corporate vision and the strategic direction needed to attain CMHC’s mandate and realize its strategic direction. The position requires an individual with superior communication skills, both written and oral, and the ability to act as a spokesperson in representing CMHC with the media, stakeholders and parliamentarians.

To achieve its objectives and carry out his/her mandate, the President and CEO will possess high ethical standards, sound judgment, integrity, superior interpersonal skills and high levels of tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

No person shall be appointed or continue as President if that person is a director, officer or employee of a lending institution; is not a Canadian citizen or otherwise a British subject ordinarily resident in Canada; or is employed in any capacity in the federal public administration or the public service of a province or holds any office or position for which a salary is payable out of public moneys, but this does not prohibit such a person from holding office while performing temporary service for the Government of Canada or of a province.

A person appointed as President who is a shareholder of a lending institution shall divest themselves of ownership of their shares of the lending institution within three months after the date of their appointment and afterwards shall not during their term of office have an interest or right either directly or indirectly as a shareholder in a lending institution. (In some circumstances a blind trust may be appropriate.)

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/index.cfm.

To explore this opportunity further, please call Michelle Richard or Andrew Dumont of Odgers Berndtson at 613-749-9909 or by email at andrew.dumont@odgersberndtson.ca. To be considered for this position, please submit your resume and covering letter online at www.odgersberndtson.ca/en/careers/11596.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[24-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Regional Member (Quebec) [full-time position]

Salary range: $139,900–$164,500

Location: Montréal, Quebec

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an independent regulatory body, established under the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act. As a member of the Canadian Heritage portfolio, the CRTC is responsible for regulating and supervising all aspects of the Canadian broadcasting system with a view to implementing the broadcasting policy set out in the Broadcasting Act. It also regulates telecommunications in Canada to implement the policy set out in the Telecommunications Act. In addition, the CRTC has responsibilities under Canada’s anti-spam legislation, which addresses the sending of commercial electronic messages (e.g. spam), among other things. The CRTC’s role is thus to maintain a delicate balance “in the public interest” between the cultural, social and economic goals of the legislation on broadcasting and telecommunications. The CRTC is accountable for its activities to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

The ideal candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or a combination of equivalent education, job-related training and/or experience. Experience in providing advice on complex issues at a senior level is required. The ideal candidate should possess experience in either the broadcasting, telecommunications or digital media industries. Experience as a member or legal counsel within a quasi-judicial tribunal or experience appearing before a quasi-judicial tribunal would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate should possess knowledge of the legislative framework and mandate of the CRTC and other relevant federal legislation. Knowledge of the regulatory and technological environments in which the broadcasting, telecommunications and digital media sectors operate in Canada and abroad is required. The ideal candidate should have an understanding of international, social and economic trends; consumer interests; stakeholder concerns; the role of Government in formulating public policy; and of how these relate to the CRTC. The ideal candidate should also have knowledge and understanding of the procedures and practices involved in conducting quasi-judicial hearings.

The ideal candidate must be able to interpret the provisions of various statutes, regulations, policies and other documents. The ability to render fair, equitable and timely decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences, in a rapidly evolving environment is required, as is the ability to develop effective working relationships and build consensus. The ideal candidate must be able to communicate effectively, in writing and orally, and to represent the CRTC, when required, with a wide range of stakeholders.

The ideal candidate must be a person of sound judgment, integrity and impartiality. The ideal candidate possesses and adheres to high ethical standards, and has superior interpersonal skills, tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

Pursuant to subsection 5(1) of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act, “a person is not eligible to be appointed or to continue as a member of the Commission if the person is not a Canadian citizen ordinarily resident in Canada or if, directly or indirectly, as owner, shareholder, director, officer, partner or otherwise, the person (a) is engaged in a telecommunications undertaking; or (b) has any pecuniary or proprietary interest in (i) a telecommunications undertaking, or (ii) the manufacture or distribution of telecommunication apparatus, except where the distribution is incidental to the general merchandising of goods by wholesale or retail.”

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to Montréal, Quebec, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance, and be prepared to travel across Canada.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/home-accueil.htm.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by July 2, 2013, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[24-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at March 31, 2013

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

5.4

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

1,287.5

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

5.7

 
   

1,293.2

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

19,877.7

 

Government of Canada bonds

59,416.3

 

Other investments

339.2

 
   

79,633.2

Property and equipment

 

193.9

Intangible assets

 

56.4

Other assets

 

104.0

 

81,286.1


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

60,920.4

Deposits

Government of Canada

18,073.6

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

24.7

 

Other deposits

1,222.6

 
   

19,320.9

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under

 

 

repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

612.6

 
   

612.6

   

80,853.9

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

302.2

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

432.2

81,286.1

Effective January 1, 2011, the Bank of Canada adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, May 23, 2013

S. VOKEY
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, May 23, 2013

M. CARNEY
Governor

[24-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at April 30, 2013

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

4.6

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

6.9

 
   

6.9

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

21,625.3

 

Government of Canada bonds

61,311.4

 

Other investments

338.8

 
   

83,275.5

Property and equipment

 

196.5

Intangible assets

 

56.4

Other assets

 

102.9

 

83,642.8


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

61,249.7

Deposits

Government of Canada

20,070.8

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

24.8

 

Other deposits

1,243.2

 
   

21,338.8

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under

 

 

repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

620.8

 
   

620.8

   

83,209.3

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

303.5

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

433.5

83,642.8

Effective January 1, 2011, the Bank of Canada adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, May 23, 2013

S. VOKEY
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, May 23, 2013

M. CARNEY
Governor

[24-1-o]

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote b
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote c
    Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, Vol. 146, No. 50, December 15, 2012
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote e
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote f
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote g
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote h
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote i
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote j
    Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, Vol. 146, No. 50, December 15, 2012
  • Footnote k
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote l
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote m
    S.C. 2012, c. 17, s. 58
  • Footnote n
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote o
    Acid Red 111, CAS RN 6358-57-2, is a benzidine-based acid dye previously assessed and deemed as not meeting the criteria of section 64 of CEPA 1999 under the Challenge initiative of the CMP. Information on Acid Red 111 was used to inform this assessment.
  • Footnote p
    Direct Black 38, CAS RN 1937-37-7, is a benzidine-based direct dye previously assessed and deemed as not meeting the criteria of section 64 of CEPA 1999 under the Challenge initiative of the CMP. Information on Direct Black 38 was used to inform this assessment.
  • Footnote q
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 1
    CAS RN: Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number. The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 3
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 4
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 5
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 6
    Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number.
  • Footnote 7
    Domestic Substances List
  • Footnote 8
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 9
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 10
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 11
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 12
    These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 13
    Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number.
  • Footnote 14
    Domestic Substances List
  • Footnote 15
    Descriptions are included for illustrative purposes and do not necessarily reflect Harmonized System nomenclature.