ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 37 — September 14, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

MIGRATORY BIRDS CONVENTION ACT, 1994

Notice with respect to temporary possession of migratory birds

In order to conduct a survey about avian viruses, the Canadian Minister of the Environment has issued a notice under the authority of section 36 of the Migratory Birds Regulations to vary the application of paragraph 6(b) of the Migratory Bird Regulations to allow for the temporary possession of found-dead migratory birds. A person is permitted to temporarily possess dead migratory birds to allow for “swift delivery” of such birds to provincial or territorial authorities for analysis. In all other circumstances, a prohibition against possessing the carcass of a migratory bird remains in effect. This notice comes into force for a period of one year from August 28, 2013. The Government of Canada is responsible, under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, for ensuring that populations of migratory birds are maintained, protected and conserved.

The Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre coordinates Canada’s Interagency Wild Bird Influenza Survey. Information on where to submit found-dead migratory birds is available by viewing the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre Web site at www.ccwhc.ca/contact_us.php?language=en or by telephoning 1-800-567-2033. Guidance on precautions for the handling of wild birds is available from the Public Health Agency of Canada on its Web site at www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/influenza/fs-hwb-fr-mos-eng.php.

August 28, 2013

SUE MILBURN-HOPWOOD
Director General
Canadian Wildlife Service

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Guideline for benzene in residential indoor air

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a qualitative guideline for benzene in residential indoor air, to be cited as “Guidance for Benzene in Residential Indoor Air.”

July 31, 2013

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

GUIDANCE FOR BENZENE IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR

Background

Benzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) with a relatively high vapour pressure, moderate-to-high water solubility, and low octanol/water partition coefficient that is released primarily to air. It has been identified by Health Canada as a priority indoor air contaminant through consultations with provincial and territorial health departments, as well as with key stakeholders in industrial and environmental organizations.

Exposure

Exposure of the general Canadian population to benzene is attributed predominantly to indoor air by inhalation because indoor levels generally exceed those outside, and time spent indoors is typically greater than time spent outdoors. Other routes of exposure (ingestion and dermal absorption) contribute minimally to total benzene intake (Health Canada, 2009). In studies by Health Canada, the median concentrations of benzene measured in Canadian residences range from 0.5 to 2.2 µg/m3 (Health Canada, 2012; Health Canada, 2010a; Health Canada, 2010b; Héroux et al., 2008). Indoor levels are approximately threefold higher in homes with attached garages compared to those in homes with detached garages, or no garages. Median outdoor concentrations are usually less than 1 µg/m3. The ratio of indoor/outdoor levels (I/O) ranges from 1.5 to 2.4 (median) and remains above 1 at the 25th percentile, suggesting a significant contribution of indoor sources in almost all homes.

More than half of Canadian single-family homes have an attached garage. Attached garages, when present, are the major indoor source of benzene in homes because vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions from gas-powered equipment and stored solvents in garages can enter a home (Héroux et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008; Jia, Batterman and Godwin, 2008; Batterman, Jia and Hatzivasilis, 2007). Smoking is also a significant contributor to indoor benzene levels (Héroux et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008).

The known sources could not account for all benzene measured in studies and there may be other unidentified sources in homes. Some non-smoking homes without attached garages may have indoor benzene levels similar to those in homes with attached garages. While benzene has been detected in building materials, emission rates have generally been low (<4 µg m-2 h-1) with few exceptions (e.g. adhesives and caulking) [Choi et al., 2010; Won et al., 2005; Yu and Crump, 1998; U.S. EPA, 1992; Wallace, Pellizzari and Leaderer, 1987]. Few household or consumer products have reported benzene content (Kwon et al., 2008; Kwon et al., 2007; Sack et al., 1992; U.S. EPA, 1992; Wallace, Pellizzari and Leaderer, 1987) and, in the majority of studies, benzene was not associated with household products or activities (Missia et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008; Jia, Batterman and Godwin, 2008; Jia, D’Souza and Batterman, 2008; Park and Ikeda, 2006; Brown, 2002; Ilgen et al., 2001; Kim, Harrad and Harrison, 2001). Therefore, a more systematic approach to identifying other sources of benzene indoors is warranted.

Another potential indoor source of benzene would be vapour intrusion if the groundwater or soil underlying the house is contaminated. In addition, if benzene is present in the domestic water supply, volatilization from water during bathing or showering, or while water is running from faucets may occur. The Health Canada drinking water guideline has been developed to account for all exposure pathways (ingestion, inhalation, dermal absorption); thus, if a water supply complies with the drinking water guideline regarding benzene content, the health risk of such exposure would be negligible.

Health effects

Human exposure to benzene has been linked to dizziness, tremors, nausea, vomiting, headache, and drowsiness after minutes of exposure to high levels in the range of 700 to 3 000 ppm (2 240 to 9 600 mg/m3). Effects after subchronic to chronic exposures as low as <1 ppm (<3.2 mg/m3) include progressive deterioration in hematopoietic function, including bone marrow damage, changes in circulating blood cells and altered immune response (ATSDR, 2007).

Benzene is classified as a carcinogen (U.S. EPA, 1998; Environment Canada and Health and Welfare Canada, 1993; IARC, 1987). Benzene affects the blood-forming system at low levels of occupational exposure ≤1 ppm (3.2 mg/m3), and there is no evidence of a threshold. Chronic exposure to benzene has been shown to cause leukemia, a cancer of the blood or bone marrow, in occupationally exposed workers; and leukemia and lymphomas in laboratory rats and mice (Health Canada, 2009; OEHHA, 2001; Hayes et al., 1997; Rinsky, Young and Smith, 1981). The carcinogenic mode of action for benzene is not well understood; however, a series of important biological events progressing from metabolism to development of leukemia has been proposed (Meek and Klaunig, 2010).

Health Canada and other organizations have characterized the cancer risk associated with exposure to benzene in air (Health Canada, 1996; OEHHA, 2001; U.S. EPA, 2000). All of these values can be expressed as an increased risk of leukemia over a lifetime. The basis for these values is epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed individuals. The derivation of any reference value requires careful consideration of many factors and the adoption of several assumptions. Differences in these key inputs are reflected in the range of published toxicological reference values for benzene. However, considering the uncertainties identified with extrapolation of risks associated with exposures at occupational levels to lower, environmentally relevant concentrations, the shape of the dose-response curve and the mode of action of benzene-associated leukemia, these reference concentration values are within a similar band of uncertainty.

From the cancer risk analyses by Health Canada (1996), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 2000) and the California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA, 2001), the concentrations associated with a 1 × 10-6 (one in one million) risk of leukemia range from 0.06 µg/m3 (the most justifiable unit risk identified by the OEHHA [2001]) to 0.45 µg/m3 (the upper bound of the range presented by U.S. EPA [2000]). Guidance on benzene levels indoors has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2010) and the European Commission (2005). Both of these organizations suggest that benzene levels indoors should be minimized as much as possible, but neither organization has developed a numerical guideline value for benzene levels indoors.

The real cancer risk from benzene in most Canadian homes, while not always negligible, is uncertain. Environmental levels are at least three orders of magnitude lower (in µg/m3 range) than the occupational exposure levels in the key studies (in mg/m3 range), and conservative assumptions were used when extrapolating from the risks based on high exposures. However, the uncertainty associated with the estimation of cancer risk at environmental exposure levels may be reduced when a clear mode of action of benzene toxicity in humans is established and applied to better estimate the dose-response relationship at low exposures.

Guidance

The range of estimates of carcinogenic risks of benzene indicates that there may be a low but non-negligible risk at indoor exposure levels. On this basis, from a practical perspective, Health Canada has opted to use a qualitative approach, recommending that individuals take actions to reduce exposure to benzene indoors as much as possible. Measures to control known indoor sources may reduce benzene concentrations such that the risk to residents is very low. As further sources are identified and effective control measures developed, Health Canada will incorporate additional recommendations on reducing benzene levels in its communications to health and building professionals and the public.

While all indoor sources of benzene in Canadian homes could not be characterized, addressing the strongest predictors identified is likely to have the most significant impact on indoor levels. Exposure reduction strategies should be targeted towards the primary sources of benzene indoors over which homeowners have control, namely attached garages and indoor smoking. Indoor benzene levels may be minimized by

  • Preventing leaks from an attached garage to the house;
  • Making sure that there is an appropriate seal between the home and the garage, particularly for any door that connects the two. This can be achieved by providing an appropriate air barrier and a sealed door between the garage and house and drywalling shared walls between the garage and house. These actions will also reduce the air exchange between the home and the garage;
  • Installing an exhaust fan in an attached garage;
  • Not idling vehicles in an attached garage;
  • Not starting gas-powered equipment in an attached garage; and
  • Not smoking inside the home or the garage.

Where possible, removing solvents and gas-powered equipment, tools or engines from attached garages, since most small engines do not have emission controls on evaporative releases, may also be considered.

While there is some evidence (CMHC, 2004; Ilgen et al., 2001) to support a reduction in indoor benzene levels originating from attached garages following these exposure reduction strategies, further research is required to understand which mitigation measures are the most technically feasible and cost-effective at reducing the migration of benzene from attached garages indoors. As well, research is needed into the predictors of elevated benzene in homes with detached garages or without garages.

References
  • ATSDR. (2007) “Toxicological Profile for Benzene.” Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, 1–438. Available at www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp.asp? id=40&tid=14.

  • Batterman, S., Jia, C. and Hatzivasilis, G. (2007) “Migration of volatile organic compounds from attached garages to residences: A major exposure source.” Environmental research, 104(2), 224–240.

  • Brown, S. K. (2002) “Volatile organic pollutants in new and established buildings in Melbourne, Australia.” Indoor air, 12(1), 55–63.

  • Choi, D. H., Kang, D. H., Kim, S. S., Yeo, M. S. and Kim, K. W. (2010) “The impact of a non-adhesive floating installation method on emissions and indoor concentrations of VOCs.” Indoor and Built Environment, 19(4), 435–443.

  • CMHC. (2004) “Garage Performance Testing. Technical Series 04-108.” Research Highlight. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

  • Environment Canada and Health and Welfare Canada. (1993) “Canadian Environmental Protection Act. Priority Substances List Assessment Report: Benzene.” Minister of Supply and Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Available at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/contaminants/ psl1-lsp1/benzene/benzene-eng.pdf.

  • European Commission. (2005) “The INDEX Project: Critical Appraisal of the Setting and Implementation of Indoor Exposure Limits in the EU.” Joint Research Centre, 1–331.

  • Hayes, R. B., Yin, S. N., Dosemeci, M., Li, G. L., Wacholder, S., Travis, L. B., Li, C. Y., Rothman, N., Hoover, R. N. and Linet, M. S. (1997) “Benzene and the dose-related incidence of hematologic neoplasms in China.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 89(14), 1065–1071.

  • Health Canada. (2012) “Halifax Indoor Air Quality Study (2009): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary.” Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2010a) “Regina Indoor Air Quality Study (2007): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling.” Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2010b) “Windsor Exposure Assessment Study (2005-2006): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling.” Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2009) “Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document — Benzene.” Health Canada, Ottawa. Available at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/water-eau/benzene/ benzene-eng.pdf.

  • Health Canada. (1996) “Health-Based Tolerable Daily Intakes/ Concentrations and Tumorigenic Doses/Concentrations for Priority Substances.” Minister of Supply and Services Canada.

  • Héroux, M. È., Clark, N., Ryswyk, K. V., Mallick, R., Gilbert, N. L., Harrison, I., Rispler, K., Wang, D., Anastassopoulos, A., Guay, M., MacNeill, M. and Wheeler, A. J. (2010) “Predictors of Indoor Air Concentrations in Smoking and Non-Smoking Residences.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 7, 3080–3099.

  • Héroux, M. È., Gauvin, D., Gilbert, N. L., Guay, M., Dupuis, G., Legris, M. and Lévesque, B. (2008) “Housing characteristics and indoor concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Quebec City, Canada.” Indoor and Built Environment, 17(2), 128–137.

  • IARC. (1987) “Benzene.” In: “Overall evaluations of carcinogenicity: An updating of IARC Monographs volumes 1-42.” IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Risk of Chemicals to Man, Supplement 7, 120.

  • Ilgen, E., Levsen, K., Angerer, J., Schneider, P., Heinrich, J. and Wichmann, H.-E. (2001) “Aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheric environment. Part Ⅱ: Univariate and multivariate analysis and case studies of indoor concentrations.” Atmospheric Environment, 35(7), 1253–1264.

  • Jia, C., Batterman, S. and Godwin, C. (2008) “VOCs in industrial, urban and suburban neighborhoods, Part 2: Factors affecting indoor and outdoor concentrations.” Atmospheric Environment, 42(9), 2101–2116.

  • Jia, C., D’Souza, J. and Batterman, S. (2008) “Distributions of personal VOC exposures: A population-based analysis.” Environment international, 34(7), 922–931.

  • Kim, Y. M., Harrad, S. and Harrison, R. M. (2001) “Concentrations and sources of VOCs in urban domestic and public microenvironments.” Environmental Science and Technology, 35(6), 997–1004.

  • Kwon, K. D, Jo, W. K., Lim, H. J. and Jeong, W. S. (2008) “Volatile pollutants emitted from selected liquid household products.” Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 15(6), 521–526.

  • Kwon, K. D., Jo, W. K., Lim, H. J. and Jeong, W. S. (2007) “Characterization of emissions composition for selected household products available in Korea.” Journal of hazardous materials, 148(1–2), 192–198.

  • Meek, M. E. and Klaunig, J. E. (2010) “Proposed mode of action of benzene-induced leukemia: Interpreting available data and identifying critical data gaps for risk assessment.” Chemico-biological interactions, 184(1–2), 279–285.

  • Missia, D. A., Demetriou, E., Michael, N., Tolis, E. I. and Bartzis, J. G. (2010) “Indoor exposure from building materials: A field study.” Atmospheric Environment, 44(35), 4388–4395.

  • OEHHA. (2001) “Public Health Goal for Benzene in Drinking Water.” Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, CA. Available at www.oehha.ca.gov/water/phg/pdf/ BenzeneFinPHG.pdf.

  • Park, J. S. and Ikeda, K. (2006) “Variations of formaldehyde and VOC levels during 3 years in new and older homes.” Indoor air, 16(2), 129–135.

  • Rinsky, R. A., Young, R. J. and Smith, A. B. (1981) “Leukemia in benzene workers.” American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2(3), 217–245.

  • Sack, T. M., Steele, D. H., Hammerstrom, K. and Remmers, J. (1992) “A survey of household products for volatile organic compounds.” Atmospheric Environment — Part A General Topics, 26 A(6), 1063–1070.

  • U.S. EPA. (2000) United States Environmental Protection Agency. Integrated Risk Information System. Benzene (CASRN 71-43-2). Last updated on 2010-03-16 (www.epa. gov/iris/subst/0276.htm#refinhal).

  • U.S. EPA. (1998) “Carcinogenic effects of benzene: An update.” National Centre for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (EPA/600/P-97/001F) [as cited in Health Canada 2009].

  • U.S. EPA. (1992) “Indoor Air Quality Data Base for Organic Compounds.” United States Environmental Protection Agency. EPA-600-R-92-025. Washington, D.C.

  • Wallace, L. A., Pellizzari, E. and Leaderer, B. (1987) “Emission of volatile organic compounds from building materials and consumer products.” Atmospheric Environment, 21(2), 385–393.

  • WHO. (2010) WHO guidelines for indoor air quality: selected pollutants. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Available at www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/ 0009/128169/e94535.pdf.

  • Won, D., Magee, R. J., Yang, W., Lusztyk, E., Nong, G. and Shaw, C. Y. (2005) “A material emission database for 90 target VOCs.” Indoor Air 2005, The 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Beijing, China, Sept. 4–9, 2005, 1–6. Available at www.archive.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/irc/ doc/pubs/nrcc48314/nrcc48314.pdf.

  • Yu, C. and Crump, D. (1998) “A review of the emission of VOCs from polymeric materials used in buildings.” Building and Environment, 33(6), 357–374.

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the material safety data sheet to which it relates. “Affected parties” means a person who is not a competitor of the claimant and who uses, supplies or is otherwise involved in the use or supply of the controlled product at a work place, and includes

  • (a) a supplier of the controlled product;

  • (b) an employee at the work place;

  • (c) an employer at the work place;

  • (d) a safety and health professional for the work place;

  • (e) a safety and health representative or a member of a safety and health committee for the work place; and

  • (f) a person who is authorized in writing to represent

    • (i) a supplier referred to in paragraph (a) or an employer referred to in paragraph (c), or

    • (ii) an employee referred to in paragraph (b), except where that person is an official or a representative of a trade union that is not certified or recognized in respect of the work place.

Written representations respecting a claim for exemption cited in the present notice, or respecting the material safety data sheet or label to which the claim relates, must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate, 427 Laurier Avenue W, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

STEPHANIE REID
Chief Screening Officer

The claim listed below seeks a business exemption from the disclosure of employer confidential information in respect of a controlled product. The confidential information would otherwise be required to be disclosed by the provisions of the applicable provincial legislation relating to occupational health and safety.

Claimant

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS)

Registry Number

Greensolv Inc., Baie-D’Urfé, Quebec

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

G-Strip 255-8ADD

9002

The claims listed below seek exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a controlled product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the Hazardous Products Act.

Claimant

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS)

Registry Number

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

Chemical identity of one ingredient

PETROSWEET(TM) HS03507 H2S SCAVENGER

8849

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

Chemical identity of five ingredients

CRONOX(TM) 277 Corrosion Inhibitor

8850

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

Chemical identity of one ingredient

PETROSTEP S-3B

8851

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

Chemical identity of two ingredients

PETROSTEP S-13D HA

8852

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL(TM) NH SOLVENT 602

8853

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL(TM) AP SOLVENT 810

8854

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL(TM) NH SOLVENT 608

8855

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL(TM) AP SOLVENT 814

8856

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL(TM) AP SOLVENT 804

8857

Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania

Chemical identity of one ingredient

Ancamide® 702 B75 Curing Agent

8858

DuPont Electronic Technologies-MCM, Raleigh, North Carolina

Chemical identity of one ingredient

5880

8859

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

EMBREAK 2W2014

8860

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

PETROFLO 20Y3416

8861

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

PROSWEET S1761

8862

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Chemical identity of four ingredients

M90033 12C Sealant

8863

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

SPEC-AID 8Q403ULS

8864

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

THERMOFLO 7031

8865

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

Chemical identity of three ingredients

TOLAD™ 3514 ADDITIVE

8866

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

NALCO® DVP6P011

8867

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

NALCO® DVP6P012

8868

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of four ingredients

NALCO® VX10987

8869

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of four ingredients

3M™ HEAVY DUTY MULTI-SURFACE CLEANER Concentrate (Twist ’n Fill™ Product No. 2)

8870

E.I. DuPont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

DuPont™ Capstone® FS-31

8871

E.I. DuPont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

DuPont™ Capstone® CP

8872

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

SCOTCHKOTE 207R Rough Overcoating

8873

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of six ingredients

NALCO® VX10902

8874

Engenium Chemicals Corporation, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

ZX-102

8875

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

HY BRITE(R) DB

8876

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of two ingredients

SCOTCH-WELD(TM) STRUCTURAL ADHESIVE FILM, AF 163-2

8877

Engenium Chemicals Corporation, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

OPTIPLUS

8878

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

DWP-124

8879

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

Chemical identity of one ingredient

TOLAD™ 3060 ADDITIVE

8880

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of two ingredients

Scotchkote 413 Spray Grade Fusion Bonded Epoxy Coating

8881

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

Chemical identity of three ingredients

HiTEC® 388 Performance Additive

8882

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

Chemical identity of six ingredients

HiTEC® 348 Performance Additive

8883

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

Chemical identity of three ingredients

HiTEC® 397G Performance Additive

8884

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of two ingredients

3M™ Anisotropic Conductive Film 7376-30

8885

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

pHREEdom® 5200M

8886

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

NALCO® OS2190

8887

Rohm and Haas Canada LP, West Hill, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

PARALOID ™ EXL-2650A Engineering Resin Additive

8888

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity of two ingredients

UCARSOL™ HS SOLVENT 133

8889

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

UCARSOL™ HS SOLVENT 102

8890

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity of two ingredients

TRITON™ DF-20 Surfactant

8891

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

Losalt LS1512

8892

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

Inhibitor VCS2000

8893

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Losalt LS1521

8894

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

Petroflo 20Y3450

8895

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

Chemical identity of one ingredient

LUBAD® 1817

8896

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

Chemical identity of three ingredients

TOXIMUL 8362

8898

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

Niax® silicone L-878

8899

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

Chemical identity of one ingredient

OLOA® 55508

8900

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

Scotchkote 626-155 Fusion Bonded Epoxy Coating

8901

ZEC Lubrication Inc., Ottawa, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

AC-XL

8902

Arkema Canada Inc., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity of two ingredients

LUPEROX® RTM

8903

Rohm and Haas Canada LP, West Hill, Ontario

Chemical identity of three ingredients

PARALOID™EXL-2314 IMPACT MODIFIER

8904

PMC ORGANOMETALLIX, Mount Laurel, New Jersey

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

THERMOLITE 176

8905

PMC ORGANOMETALLIX, Mount Laurel, New Jersey

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

THERMOLITE 178

8906

PMC ORGANOMETALLIX, Mount Laurel, New Jersey

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

THERMOLITE 140

8907

Innospec Fuel Specialties, Newark, Delaware

Chemical identity of one ingredient

DDA-3525 IA2

8908

BASF Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario

Chemical identity of one ingredient

Plurafac SLF 180

8909

Cytec Industries Inc., Woodland Park, New Jersey

Chemical identity of one ingredient

CYASORB(R) 390C Stabilizer

8910

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity of two ingredients

RockOn ™ MX 5-3120

8911

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

MC SS-5041

8912

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

MC MX 2-2822

8913

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DETACK EC9444D

8914

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

NALCO® VX11001

8915

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DETACK EC9440D

8916

MeadWestvaco Corp. Specialty Chemicals Div., North Charleston, South Carolina

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

MORLIFE(TM) 5000

8917

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DETACK EC9451D

8918

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP, Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

EBECRYL(R) 81 radiation curing resins

8919

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

DOW(TM) IC 210 Gas Conditioning Chelate

8920

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DOW(TM) CA-2003 Sulfur Conditioning Additive

8921

E.I. DuPont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Capstone(R) LPA

8922

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

AS-9 Anti-Sludging Agent

8923

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

AS-7 Anti-Sludging Agent

8924

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

A-Sperse

8925

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

19N

8926

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

CL-11 CROSSLINKER

8927

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

CL-41

8928

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

CleanLink

8929

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

FDP-S1047-12

8930

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

BC-200 UC

8931

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

CAT-3 ACTIVATOR

8932

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Cla-Web (TM)

8933

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Clayfix II Plus

8934

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

CLAYFIX II MATERIAL

8935

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

CT-ARMOR

8936

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

ES-5 PROPLOK SURFACTANT

8937

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

FDP-S821-06

8938

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

G-SPERSE

8939

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

HAI-404 (TM)

8940

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

GasPerm 1000™

8941

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

GasPerm 1100

8942

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

HAI-OS ACID INHIBITOR

8943

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

HC-2

8944

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

HII-500M CORROSION INHIBITOR INTENSIFIER

8945

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

HZ-20

8946

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

LCA-1

8947

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

MO-86M

8948

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

MUSOL A SOLVENT

8949

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

PARASPERSE CLEANER

8950

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

PEN-88M

8951

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

SGA-HT M Gelling Agent

8952

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

SPERSE-ALL M

8953

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

SSO-21M WINTERIZED

8954

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

WS-36 EMULSIFYING AGENT

8955

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

WS-36M

8956

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

MO-85M

8957

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of six ingredients

NALCO® EC1630A

8958

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

HY BRITE(R) DB-1300

8959

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

TXP-17

8960

Les Spécialités L.E.N., Granby, Quebec

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Cleanearth™ Scalecide

8961

Les Spécialités L.E.N., Granby, Quebec

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Cleanearth™ Envirocide

8962

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of five ingredients

CLEAN N COR (R) EC1579W

8963

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

TXP-18

8964

Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Kure-Shi, Hiroshima-Ken

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

H3-1

8965

W-TECH Technologies Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

MD800

8966

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

OLOA® 40814

8967

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

MAR501S

8968

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of six ingredients

NALCO® VX10986

8969

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DAP-634

8970

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

BREAXIT® SP177

8971

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

BREAXIT® SP354

8972

SSC Inc., Hamilton, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

SCL 802IC

8973

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

3M(TM) 8805UV Black Piezo Inkjet Ink

8974

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

NALCO® EC9453A

8975

MeadWestvaco Corp. Specialty Chemicals Div., North Charleston, South Carolina

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

INDULIN® 814A

8976

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

LGC-VI UC

8977

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

FDP-S867A-07

8978

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

CAS-1

8979

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

MO-85 LP

8980

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

D-AIR 3000W

8981

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of six ingredients

NALCO® EC1632A

8982

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

ASP® FNE200

8983

Evonik Corporation, Parsippany, New Jersey

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

Dynasylan® HYDROSIL 1151

8984

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

SS-5

8985

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of four ingredients

NALCO® EC1417A

8986

Italmatch Chemicals S.p.A., San Benigno, Genova

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

SPE 0108

8987

Italmatch Chemicals S.p.A., San Benigno, Genova

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

SPE 0001

8988

Lubrizol Corporation, Wickliffe, Ohio

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

LUBRIZOL® CV9601

8989

Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, Michigan

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

DOW CORNING(R) XX-1060 THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE MATERIAL

8990

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

EBECRYL® 8414 radiation curing resins

8991

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 3708 radiation curing resins

8992

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

EBECRYL® 860 radiation curing resins

8993

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

EBECRYL® 450 radiation curing resins

8994

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 83 radiation curing resins

8995

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 168 radiation curing resins

8996

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 350 radiation curing resins

8997

Lubrizol Corporation, Wickliffe, Ohio

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

AMIDEX(TM) 1248 SURFACTANT

8998

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 438 radiation curing resins

8999

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 220 radiation curing resins

9000

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

EBECRYL® 265 radiation curing resins

9001

Kop-Coat, St. Louis, Missouri

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

DRI-WRAP (5-13)

9003

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Application for surrender of charter

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of subsection 32(2) of the Canada Corporations Act, an application for surrender of charter was received from

File No.

Name of Company

Received

176695-3

KAMADHENU MEDICAL RELIEF INCORPORATED

14/08/2013

September 6, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

759409-7

Islamic Society of Regina

07/08/2013

292425-1

THE MCCORD MUSEUM FOUNDATION/ LA FONDATION DU MUSÉE MCCORD

05/07/2013

283294-1

THE ORGANIZATION OF MILITARY MUSEUMS OF CANADA, INC./ L’ORGANISATION DES MUSEES MILITAIRES DU CANADA, INC.

26/07/2013

September 6, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent — Name change

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Old Name of Company

New Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

432359-9

CCPI CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY INGENUITY/ CCPI CENTRE CANADIEN DES POLITIQUES INGÉNIEUSES

Good Done Well

01/08/2013

444136-2

CLINTON GIUSTRA SUSTAINABLE GROWTH INITIATIVE (CANADA)

Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership (Canada)

17/07/2013

406618-9

THE ALGONQUIN TO ADIRONDACKS CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION (AACA) L’ASSOCIATION DE CONSERVATION ALGONQUIN ADIRONDACKS (AACA)

Algonquin to Adirondacks Collaborative (A2A) La Collective d’Algonquin à Adirondacks (A2A)

11/04/2013

367922-5

THE HISTORICA-DOMINION INSTITUTE / INSTITUT HISTORICA-DOMINION

Historica Canada

03/09/2013

September 6, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-007-13 — Consultation on use of the frequency band 25.05-25.25 GHz

This notice announces Industry Canada’s launch of the above-mentioned public consultation to clarify the use of the band 25.05-25.25 GHz, which is shared between fixed service systems and fixed-satellite service systems.

The proposals presented in the consultation paper are intended to facilitate the shared use of the band by systems in the fixed service and the fixed-satellite service. This goal satisfies the objective of the Spectrum Policy Framework for Canada to maximize the potential economic and social benefits that Canadians derive from the use of the radio frequency spectrum.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are invited to submit comments on the consultation paper. These comments are to be submitted within 60 days of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/ spectrum.

Respondents are requested to provide their comments to the following email address: spectrum.planning@ic.gc.ca. Other electronic formats, such as Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF, will also be accepted.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Director General, Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch, Industry Canada (JETN), 235 Queen Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H5.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SMSE-007-13).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

August 28, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[37-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-019-13 — Release of SRSP-325.25, Issue 1: Technical Requirements for Fixed Radio Systems Operating in the Bands 25.25-26.5 GHz and 27.5-28.35 GHz

Notice is hereby given that Industry Canada is releasing Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-325.25, Issue 1: Technical Requirements for Fixed Radio Systems Operating in the Bands 25.25-26.5 GHz and 27.5-28.35 GHz, which sets out the minimum technical requirements for the efficient use of these bands.

General information

SRSP-325.25, Issue 1, will come into force as of the date of publication of this notice.

Any inquiries regarding SRSP-325.25 should be directed to the Manager, Fixed Wireless Systems, 613-991-0035 (telephone), 613-952-5108 (fax), srsp.pnrh@ic.gc.ca (email).

Interested parties should submit their comments within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Submitting comments

Respondents are requested to provide their comments in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Fixed Wireless Systems.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Director General, Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch, Industry Canada, 235 Queen Street (JETN19), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H5. All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SMSE-019-13).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

August 8, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[37-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Rogers Bank — Order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 49(1) of the Bank Act, of an order to commence and carry on business authorizing Rogers Bank to commence and carry on business, effective August 23, 2013.

August 30, 2013

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[37-1-o]