ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 49 — December 7, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Notice requesting comments on a proposal to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to establish the electronic travel authorization (eTA) program

Summary

Notice is hereby given that Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is seeking written comments from all interested parties on a proposal to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (the “Regulations”) to introduce an electronic travel authorization (eTA) requirement.

Under the proposed measures, all foreign nationals who are currently exempt from the requirement to obtain a temporary resident visa (TRV), other than citizens of the United States, would be required to apply for and obtain an eTA prior to travelling to Canada by air, unless otherwise exempted. Implementation of the eTA requirement is expected in April 2015.

Background

As part of the Canada-United States Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan (the “Action Plan”), Canada and the United States committed to establishing a common approach to screening visa-exempt foreign nationals in order to identify threats before they arrive in the North American perimeter. To fulfil this commitment, Canada is introducing the eTA program. The United States successfully implemented a similar program, known as the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA), in 2008.

By screening visa-exempt foreign nationals before they arrive in Canada by air, the proposed regulatory amendments would help the Government of Canada prevent those who are inadmissible or do not meet the requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (the “Act”) from travelling to Canada, while facilitating travel for low-risk individuals. A key consideration in designing the eTA program would be to provide timely and expeditious decisions based on relevant information provided electronically by the applicant.

Description

The purpose of this Notice of Intent is to signal an intention to amend the Regulations in order to implement the eTA program.

The proposed regulatory amendments would require that most current visa-exempt foreign nationals apply for and obtain an eTA before entering Canada by air. As Canadian citizens are exempt from the U.S. ESTA requirement, U.S. citizens would be exempt from the eTA requirement.

Other limited exemptions to the eTA requirement may be considered, such as in instances where Canada has international obligations.

Foreign nationals who are currently exempt from the TRV and who could be subject to the eTA requirement include

  • Citizens of current visa-exempt countries listed in subsection 190(1) of the Regulations, other than citizens of the United States, and foreign nationals travelling with passports listed under subsections 190(2) and (2.1); and
  • Foreign nationals currently listed in subsection 190(3) of the Regulations, such as
  • Air crew members;
  • Foreign nationals transiting through Canada under the Transit Without Visa Program or China Transit Program; and
  • Foreign nationals re-entering Canada after a visit solely to the United States or Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, providing the requirements of paragraph 190(3)(f) are met.

To make the process as efficient as possible, the proposed regulatory amendments would specify that foreign nationals who require an eTA must apply online through the CIC Web site by entering mandatory biographic, passport and background information similar to the information that is currently requested by officers at ports of entry or in applications for a TRV.

In order to determine that the eTA applicant is not inadmissible and meets the requirements of the Act, an electronic system would perform an examination that includes a risk assessment and a verification of the information provided in the application against immigration and enforcement databases. It is expected that the vast majority of applications would be approved by the electronic system within minutes of applying. It is also expected that eTA travellers may experience faster processing when they arrive in Canada as they have already been pre-screened.

The proposed regulatory changes would specify that those applications not approved by the electronic system would be referred to an officer for further examination. If an examination by an officer is required, officers would have the ability to either approve or deny an eTA application after making a determination on whether a foreign national is inadmissible or does not meet the requirements of the Act. The grounds of inadmissibility that could result in a denied eTA application are currently described in the Act and are the same grounds that could result in a denied application in other immigration lines of business; for example, a foreign national could be inadmissible for reasons such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, international human rights violations, security or criminality.

After an eTA is issued by either the automated system or an officer, officers would also have the ability to suspend or cancel an eTA if the foreign national becomes inadmissible to Canada at a later time.

Foreign nationals who are subject to these regulatory changes would not be authorized to travel to Canada without a valid eTA. The Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiative, being led by the Canada Border Services Agency, would be the mechanism by which the eTA requirement would be enforced. For more information regarding the IAPI initiative, please visit www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/btb-pdf/ate-atpem-eng.html.

Finally, the proposed Regulations would require that foreign nationals pay a cost recovery fee, expected to be for a minimal amount, before submitting their application. Approved eTA applications would be valid for multiple entries to Canada over a period not exceeding five years.

Comments

This Notice of Intent is an opportunity for the public to provide early comments and input into the proposed regulatory amendments described above, before the Regulations are prepublished in the Canada Gazette. The prepublication process would provide an additional opportunity for public consultation on the proposed Regulations.

Anyone may, within 45 days of the publication of this notice, provide their comments on this Notice of Intent, in writing, to the person named below at the address provided.

Questions and requests for additional information, as well as comments on this Notice of Intent, may be directed to Tina Matos, Director, Document and Visa Policy, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, 300 Slater Street, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1L1, 613-954-6243 (telephone), 613-952-9187 (fax), tina.matos@cic.gc.ca (email).

November 14, 2013

TINA MATOS
Director
Document and Visa Policy
Admissibility Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism— Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strain ATCC (see footnote 1) 13525— specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas P. fluorescens strain ATCC 13525 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment Report of P. fluorescens Strain ATCC 13525

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment on a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, ATCC 13525. This strain was added to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) under subsection 105(1) of CEPA 1999 because it was manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, and it entered or was released into the environment without being subject to conditions under CEPA 1999 or any other federal or provincial legislation.

P. fluorescens is considered to be an ubiquitous bacterium and it has the ability to adapt to and thrive in soil and on plants and aqueous surfaces. Multiple potential uses of P. fluorescens in various industrial and commercial sectors exist. These uses include pulp and paper and textile processing; municipal and industrial wastewater treatment; waste degradation, particularly in petroleum refineries; and bioremediation and biodegradation. P. fluorescens is also used in commercial and household drain cleaners and degreasers, enzyme and chemical production, septic tank additives and general cleaning and odour-control products. Other uses include pest control, plant growth promotion and use as an anti-frost agent.

There is no evidence from the scientific literature to suggest that P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 is likely to have a considerable impact on animal and plant populations in the environment. P. fluorescens is not considered a plant or an animal pathogen by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), and the CFIA does not require a permit for the import of this organism into Canada under the Plant Protection Act.

P. fluorescens is classified as a Risk Group 1 (RG1) organism by the Public Health Agency of Canada, meaning that it is unlikely to cause disease in healthy workers under ordinary circumstances in the research laboratory. There have been no reported infections attributed to the strain P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. Information from the scientific literature indicates that P. fluorescens is unlikely to infect the general Canadian population, but that it can infect humans with compromised immunity, and human outbreaks, associated with contaminated medical devices and fluids, have been reported. P. fluorescens can also grow at temperatures typical of refrigerated storage, a characteristic which has enabled it to proliferate in stored blood products and cause sepsis in transfused patients.

This assessment considers human and environmental exposure to P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 from its deliberate use in household or commercial products or in industrial processes in Canada. The Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey (notice) under section 71 of CEPA 1999, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, on October 3, 2009. Information submitted in response to the notice indicates that 100 to 1 000 kg of P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 were imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 does not meet any of the criteria as set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999 at current levels of exposure.

However, should exposure increase through new activities, there is a potential risk to human health, based on the pathogenicity of P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 to susceptible humans. Therefore, there is concern that new activities for the above-mentioned living organism, which have not been identified or assessed, could lead to the living organism meeting the criteria as set out in section 64 of the Act. Therefore, it is recommended that the above-mentioned living organism be subject to the Significant New Activity provisions specified under subsection 106(3) of the Act, to require that any new manufacture, import or use of this living organism undergo ecological and human health assessments as specified in section 108 of the Act, prior to the commencement of the new activity.

The draft Screening Assessment report for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of living organisms — Nitrococcus sp. 16972-7 (see footnote 2) and Nitrosococcus sp. 16971-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Nitrococcus sp. 16972-7 and Nitrosococcus sp. 16971-6 are micro-organisms on the Domestic Substances List, added under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment report conducted on these living organisms, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these living organisms do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these living organisms at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of Draft Screening Assessment Report of
Nitrococcus sp. 16972-7 and Nitrosococcus sp. 16971-6

Organism

Strain/Accession Number

Nitrococcus species

16972-7

Nitrosococcusspecies

16971-6

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two lower-hazard (Priority C) micro-organism strains. These strains were nominated and added to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) because they were manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, and they entered or were released into the environment without being subject to CEPA 1999 or any other federal or provincial legislation.

Living organisms on the DSL were prioritized into three groups (Priority A, B, C) based on known hazard characteristics. The 22 micro-organisms in the Priority C (lower-hazard) group are being assessed using an expedited approach in parallel with the more complex assessment of 16 micro-organisms in the Priority A (higher-hazard) group, with the objective of assessing the entire number of DSL micro-organisms more efficiently and providing greater certainty to industries that use these micro-organisms. The Priority C group was further subdivided into four “lots” for assessment based on their taxonomic classification (genus or species) and their known and potential uses related to their biological properties and on whether they remain in commerce in Canada. This notice pertains to Lot 2 of the Priority C group. For more information, please refer to the document titled Prioritization of Micro-organisms on the Domestic Substances List prior to the Screening Assessment under paragraph 74(b) of CEPA 1999, available on the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

The two micro-organisms in Lot 2 are naturally occurring bacteria which thrive mainly in marine, coastal and brackish waters. Neither is recognized as a human pathogen by the Public Health Agency of Canada and no adverse human health effects have been associated with these strains, their genetic material, secondary metabolites or structural components. Similarly, neither of these strains is recognized as an animal or plant pathogen by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Furthermore, an in-depth scientific literature search yielded no reports of the presence of virulence factors or evidence of toxicity or pathogenicity towards humans, plants, vertebrates, or invertebrates. These observations are supported by our understanding of the roles played by these micro-organisms in nature, which do not suggest a potential for pathogenic effects, and by genomic sequencing and analysis, which did not identify attributes associated with pathogenicity.

The hazard potential associated with the micro-organisms in Lot 2 was estimated to be low for both the environment and human health.

There are no current uses for the two micro-organism strains in Lot 2; however, their ability to degrade nitrogenous compounds makes them of potential use as ingredients in microbial-based products used for the maintenance of aquaria and ornamental ponds, wastewater treatment, soil biodegradation; in pharmaceuticals or personal care products; and for production of enzymes.

If potential uses were realized, human exposure would occur primarily through direct contact with consumer, household and commercial products containing these micro-organisms and is expected to be moderate. Inadvertent exposure through treated aquarium and pond water, wastewater and industrial effluents, or biodegraded soil is not expected to be significant. If Nitrosococcussp. 16971-6, specifically, is used in pharmaceuticals or personal care products, direct human exposure could be high, but would depend on the product formulation, frequency of use, and mode of application.

Environmental flora and fauna may come into contact with these micro-organisms when they are released to municipal wastewater and soil, from household, commercial, industrial or manufacturing activities. However, growth and persistence of these micro-organism strains outside the marine environment is not expected.

Given the range of potential applications of these two micro-organism strains, and market trends towards microbial-based products to replace chemical products in certain sectors, the scale and frequency of use of these strains is expected to increase. Conservative assumptions were therefore applied to the exposure characterization.

The two strains in Lot 2 are not recognized to cause disease and the routes of exposure are not expected to lead to adverse environmental or human health effects.

Given that these are naturally occurring micro-organisms, given that they play a key role in the ecosystem, and given the lack of documented evidence for adverse effects in the published literature, it is considered that these micro-organisms present a low hazard towards the environment and human health. Therefore, taking into account the exposures resulting from all their numerous potential uses, the estimated risk is expected to be low for both the environment and human health.

Based on the available information, it is concluded that the micro-organisms listed in this notice do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that the micro-organisms listed in this notice do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the available information, it is proposed to conclude that these micro-organisms do not meet the criteria as set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The summary of the draft screening assessment report as well as additional information on the assessment approach for lower hazard micro-organisms on the Domestic Substances List is available on the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of living organisms— Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC (see footnote 3) 25391, Nitrobacter species 18132-6, (see footnote 4) Nitrobacter species 16969-4, Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 25978, Nitrosomonas species 16968-3, Nitrosomonas species 18133-7, Rhodopseudomonas palustris ATCC 17001, Rhodopseudomonas species 18136-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC 25391, Nitrobacter species 18132-6, Nitrobacter species 16969-4, Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 25978, Nitrosomonas species 16968-3, Nitrosomonas species 18133-7, Rhodopseudomonas palustris ATCC 17001, and Rhodopseudomonas species 18136-1 are living organisms on the Domestic Substances List added under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Final Screening Assessment Report conducted on these living organisms, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that these living organisms do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these living organisms, at this time under section 77 of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment
RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Final Screening Assessment Report of Nitrobacter Winogradskyi ATCC 25391, Nitrobacter Species 18132-6, Nitrobacter Species 16969-4, Nitrosomonas Europaea ATCC 25978, Nitrosomonas Species 16968-3, Nitrosomonas Species 18133-7, Rhodopseudomonas Palustris ATCC 17001, and Rhodopseudomonas Species 18136-1

Organism

Strain/Accession Number

Nitrobacter winogradskyi

ATCC 25391

Nitrobacter species

18132-6

Nitrobacter species

16969-4

Nitrosomonas europaea

ATCC 25978

Nitrosomonas species

16968-3

Nitrosomonas species

18133-7

Rhodopseudomonas palustris

ATCC 17001

Rhodopseudomonas species

18136-1

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of eight lower-hazard (Priority C) micro-organism strains. These strains were nominated and added to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) because they were manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, and they entered or were released into the environment without being subject to CEPA 1999 or any other federal or provincial legislation.

Living organisms on the DSL were prioritized into three groups (Priority A, B, C) based on known hazard characteristics. The 22 micro-organisms in the Priority C (lower-hazard) group are being assessed using an expedited approach in parallel with the more complex assessment of 16 micro-organisms in the Priority A (higher-hazard) group, with the objective of assessing the entire number of DSL micro-organisms more efficiently and to provide greater certainty to industries that use these micro-organisms. The Priority C group was further subdivided into four “lots” for assessment based on their taxonomic classification (genus or species) and their known and potential uses related to their biological properties and on whether they remain in commerce in Canada. This assessment pertains to Lot 1 of the Priority C group. For more information, please refer to the document titled Prioritization of Micro-organisms on the Domestic Substances List prior to the Screening Assessment under paragraph 74(b) of CEPA 1999, available on the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

Where strain-specific data were not available, surrogate information from literature searches was used. Surrogate organisms are identified in each case to the taxonomic level provided by the source. Information identified up to January 2012 was considered for inclusion in the screening assessment report.

The eight micro-organisms in Lot 1 are naturally occurring bacteria. None is recognized as a human pathogen by the Public Health Agency of Canada, and no adverse human health effects have been associated with these strains, their genetic material, secondary metabolites or structural components. Similarly, none of these strains is recognized as an animal or plant pathogen by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency or by any member country of the International Plant Protection Convention. Furthermore, an in-depth scientific literature search yielded no reports of the presence of virulence factors or evidence of toxicity or pathogenicity towards humans, plants, vertebrates, or invertebrates. These observations are supported by an understanding of the roles played by these micro-organisms in nature, which do not suggest a potential for pathogenic effects, and by genomic sequencing and analysis which did not identify attributes associated with pathogenicity. In the highly unlikely event of infection, all Lot 1 strains are susceptible to clinically relevant antibiotics.

The hazard potential associated with the micro-organisms in Lot 1 was estimated to be low for both the environment and human health.

The eight micro-organism strains in Lot 1 are present in a variety of natural environments, but there is little information or data on the level of exposure from these settings. The purpose of the exposure assessment is to characterize human and environmental exposure to these eight strains from their deliberate use in consumer or industrial products used in Canada.

Current and potential uses of Lot 1 micro-organisms are as ingredients in microbial-based products used for bioremediation, biological waste treatment, and municipal waste water treatment; to clean drains and grease traps in restaurants; and to improve water quality in commercial and hobby fish production facilities, and more. Their mode of action is based on their ability to degrade nitrogenous wastes, grease and oils, and man-made chemicals in industrial effluents (e.g. halogenated and aromatic compounds, and active pharmaceutical ingredients).

Human exposure is expected primarily through direct contact with consumer and commercial products containing these micro-organisms. Human exposure through treated water, wastewater effluent or bioremediation sites is not expected to be significant, but environmental flora and fauna may come into contact with these micro-organisms when they are released from commercial, industrial or manufacturing activities.

Given the range of current potential applications of these micro-organisms, and market trends towards increased use of microbial-based products instead of chemical products in certain sectors, the scale and frequency of use of these strains is expected to increase with consequently higher releases to the environment. Conservative assumptions have therefore been applied to the exposure characterization.

The eight strains are not recognized to cause disease and the routes of exposure are not expected to lead to adverse environmental or human health effects.

Given the ubiquity of these organisms in nature, given that they play a key role in the ecosystem, and given the lack of documented evidence for adverse effects in the published literature, it is considered that these micro-organisms present a low hazard towards the environment and human health. Therefore, taking into account the exposures resulting from all their known and potential uses, the estimated risk is expected to be low for both the environment and human health.

Based on the available information, it is concluded that the micro-organisms listed in this notice do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that the micro-organisms listed in this notice do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on the available information, it is concluded that these micro-organisms do not meet the criteria as set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The summary of the screening assessment reports as well as additional information on the assessment approach for lower hazard micro-organisms on the Domestic Substances List is available on the Government of Canada Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Chatham-Kent Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Gary Scoyne

Ottawa, November 25, 2013

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at October 31, 2013

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

4.0

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association


 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

7.4

 
   

7.4

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

22,702.3

 

Government of Canada bonds

66,373.8

 

Other investments

332.1

 
   

89,408.2

Property and equipment

 

221.1

Intangible assets

 

54.5

Other assets

 

204.1

 

89,899.3


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

63,695.5

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,687.8

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

337.4

 

Other deposits

1,169.9

 
   

25,195.1

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under

 

 

repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

576.7

 
   

576.7

   

89,467.3

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

302.0

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

432.0

89,899.3

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, November 21, 2013

S. VOKEY
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, November 21, 2013

STEPHEN S. POLOZ
Governor

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  • Footnote 1
    ATCC: American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 2
    Accession number. Substances added to the confidential portion of the Domestic Substances List are given accession numbers.
  • Footnote 3
    ATCC: American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 4
    Accession number. Substances added to the confidential portion of the Domestic Substances List are given accession numbers.