ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 26 — June 28, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice concerning the availability of an equivalency agreement and of a report that summarizes how any comments or notices of objection were dealt with

Pursuant to subsection 10(7) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment has entered into and makes available the Agreement on the Equivalency of Federal and Nova Scotia Regulations for the Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Producers in Nova Scotia.

Notice is also hereby given pursuant to subsection 10(6) of the Act of the availability of a report summarizing how comments and notices of objection were addressed further to the 60-day public comment period.

The agreement and the report are available as of June 28, 2014, on the Department of the Environment’s Environmental Registry, located at the following address: www.ec.gc.ca/lcpe-cepa.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2014-87-05-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2014-87-05-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, June 12, 2014

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2014-87-05-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENTS

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 687-47-8
  • 17084-02-5
  • 26099-88-7
  • 35194-63-9
  • 64742-70-7
  • 69011-40-1
  • 207239-21-2
  • 1211908-05-2
  • 1217266-27-7

2. Part II of the List is amended by deleting the following:

14715-0 Lecithin metal salt
  Sel métallique de lécithine

COMING INTO FORCE

3. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2014-87-05-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Code of Practice for 2-Butanone, oxime (Butanone oxime) Associated with the Interior Application of Consumer Alkyd Paint and Coating Products

Whereas a screening assessment of 2-Butanone, oxime conducted under section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 has concluded that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

Whereas on March 6, 2010, the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, a statement under subsection 77(6) of the Act indicating their intention to recommend that 2-Butanone, oxime be added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Act;

Whereas 2-Butanone, oxime is a substance specified on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas subsection 92(1) of the Act requires a regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control action in relation to this substance be made and published in the Canada Gazette;

Notice is hereby given, under subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of Health is issuing the following code of practice under subsection 55(1) of that Act:

Code of Practice for 2-Butanone, oxime (Butanone oxime) Associated with the Interior Application of Consumer Alkyd Paint and Coating Products.

Electronic copies of this code of practice may be downloaded from the Internet at the following address: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/contaminants/butanone-oxime/index-eng.php.

February 14, 2014

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

Code of Practice for 2-Butanone, oxime (Butanone oxime) Associated with the Interior Application of Consumer Alkyd Paint and Coating Products

Glossary of terms

CEPA 1999 Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
Consumer product For the purpose of this Code, a consumer product is a product that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes.
Interior consumer alkyd paint and coating products Alkyd paint and coating products that are consumer products and that are intended to be used for interior applications.
Dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products Alkyd paint and coating products that are consumer products and that are intended to be used for both interior and exterior applications.

1.0 Objective of the Code of Practice

1.1 The objective of this code of practice (herein referred to as the “Code”) is to help reduce inhalation exposure to 2-Butanone, oxime (butanone oxime) by the general public during and immediately following interior application of consumer alkyd paint and coating products. However, all applicable municipal, provincial, territorial and federal legal requirements pertaining to this substance must be met, and a commitment by any person to adopt the practices and procedures set out in this Code does not remove obligations to comply with all applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. This Code outlines the following recommended practices:

  • (a) to reduce the concentration of butanone oxime in products to which the Code applies to the lowest level technically and economically feasible;
  • (b) to incorporate a ventilation statement on all products to which the Code applies; and
  • (c) to implement a consumer education program that will inform consumers on behaviours that will help to achieve well ventilated conditions during and following use of products to which the Code applies.

2.0 Background

2.1 The substance butanone oxime, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) 96-29-7, is part of the chemical grouping “discrete organics,” and the chemical sub-grouping “oximes,” or more specifically, “ketoximes.” Butanone oxime was included in Batch 7 of the Challenge under the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan.

2.2 The most prevalent use of butanone oxime is as an anti-skinning agent in the formulation of alkyd paints, primers, varnishes and stains. Anti-skinning agents are added to prevent air-dried coatings from forming hard, congealed films on the surface of the coating (oxidation) during storage by preventing the drier effect until application of the coating. In closed containers, the oxidation and skin formation takes place due to the presence of air between the coating surface and the closed lid. Butanone oxime is the most used anti-skinning agent in paints and is a volatile type of anti-skinning agent (i.e. will be volatilized from a formulation upon application to allow drying) [Danish Environmental Protection Agency, 2003]. The use of anti-skinning agents is a compromise between preventing skinning and retaining an adequate drying potential of the coating after application. The cross-linking should be as slow as possible during storage and then regain its full drying potential as soon as possible after application. Therefore, for drying performance, it is preferable that a minimum amount of anti-skinning agent be used (Danish Environmental Protection Agency, 2003).

3.0 Elements of exposure mitigation for the interior application of consumer alkyd paint and coating products

3.1 A study by Chang et al. (1998) examined emissions of butanone oxime immediately following application of interior alkyd paint products. This study and a publication on healthy indoor painting practices (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2000) have been considered in the development of label statements and consumer education that will serve to guide the general public on actions intended to reduce indoor air concentrations.

3.2 Mechanisms to help reduce exposure to butanone oxime during and following interior application of consumer alkyd paint and coating products are the following:

  • (a) to reduce the concentration of butanone oxime in interior and dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products to the lowest level technically and economically feasible. A means to achieve this may also include replacement of butanone oxime with an appropriate alternative;
  • (b) to increase ventilation in the work area during painting. Maximizing the ventilation and releasing air to outdoors may result in a reduction in air concentrations of butanone oxime during the work period; and
  • (c) to continue ventilation after painting which may result in a more rapid decrease in air concentrations of butanone oxime.

4.0 Persons to which the Code applies

4.1 This Code may be adopted by any person who

  • (a) manufactures, imports or sells interior or dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products containing butanone oxime in Canada; and
  • (b) has the responsibility to ensure that consumer products comply with Canadian labelling requirements.

5.0 Products to which the Code applies

5.1 This Code is recommended for

  • (a) interior consumer alkyd paint and coating products; or
  • (b) dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products.

6.0 Products excluded from the Code

6.1 This Code is not intended for consumer alkyd paint and coating products that are

  • (a) to be used exclusively for exterior applications; or
  • (b) in compliance with subsection 25(2) of the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001 (CCCR, 2001).

7.0 Recommended practices

7.1 Reduce the concentration of butanone oxime in products to which the Code applies to the lowest level technically and economically feasible.

7.2 When feasible, use alternatives to butanone oxime:

  • (a) Alternatives should be considered to reduce human health risks and minimize environmental risks; and
  • (b) Alternatives should not have the potential to produce butanone oxime.

8.0 Label statement

8.1 To help achieve reduced indoor air concentrations of butanone oxime, it is recommended that the labels of the products listed in section 5 include the following statement: “USE ONLY IN A WELL-VENTILATED AREA”.

9.0 Consumer education

9.1 In order to help reduce public/consumer inhalation exposure to butanone oxime, a person who adopts this Code should

  • (a) provide information on how to help achieve a well-ventilated area; and
  • (b) provide information on ventilation following application.

9.2 The following are examples of statements that may be used as part of the consumer education information if they do not represent a different hazard to the consumer/user of the product (for example, a product that has flammable vapours that may prevent use of a fan):

  • (a) “Open Windows and/or Blow Air Outdoors with Fan”
  • (b) “Continue Ventilation Following Application”

9.3 For the purpose of sections 9.1 and 9.2, it is recommended that any person who adopts this Code make information available to the public/consumers using one or more of the following means:

  • (a) Information pamphlet, poster or similar media at the site of product purchase;
  • (b) Information posted on a Web site; or
  • (c) Information on a label affixed to the product that does not contravene existing product labelling requirements.

10.0 Record keeping and reporting

10.1 Record keeping: Any person who adopts this Code is asked to keep at the principal place of business in Canada electronic or paper records of the information below for a period of at least five years after the day on which they are made.

  • (a) The name and civic address of the person responsible for labelling the products on behalf of the participating companies;
  • (b) A list of the interior and dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products to which this Code applies;
  • (c) Indicate if butanone oxime was removed from any of its products and replaced with another substance, demonstrating that section 7 of the Code has been adopted;
  • (d) Concentration of butanone oxime in each product (% by weight);
  • (e) Label information demonstrating that section 8 of the Code has been adopted; and
  • (f) Consumer education information including specific statements and means of communication demonstrating that section 9 of the Code has been adopted.

10.2 Reporting: Any person who adopts this Code is asked to provide electronic notice to the Government of Canada upon adoption of sections 7, 8 and 9 of the Code. This Notice will detail the specific interior and dual use consumer alkyd paint and coating products to which this Code is applied as outlined in section 10.1. A template for reporting information has been provided in Appendix 1.

10.3 Confidentiality: In this section, “confidential business information” in respect of a person to whose business or affairs the information relates, means business information

  • (a) that is not publicly available;
  • (b) in respect of which the person has taken measures that are reasonable in the circumstances to ensure that it remains not publicly available; and
  • (c) that has actual or potential economic value to the person or their competitors because it is not publicly available and its disclosure would result in a material financial loss to the person or a material financial gain to their competitors.

10.4 Request for confidentiality

10.4.1 A person who provides information to the Minister of Health under this Code may submit a written request that the information or part of it be treated as confidential business information.

10.4.2 If the Minister of Health considers that the information does not meet the definition of confidential business information, a written notice will be given to this effect to the person who had provided the information to the Minister.

10.5 Use and disclosure of confidential business information: The Minister of Health will use and disclose confidential business information in respect of which a request for confidentiality has been made under section 10.4 as permitted by law.

10.6 Disclosure of personal information: For greater certainty, personal information as defined in section 3 of the Privacy Act will be used and disclosed in accordance with that Act.

11.0 Contact information for submitting reports

11.1 Reporting documentation is to be submitted to the Minister of Health either by email, mail or fax to the following addresses. Please type: “Report on Butanone Oxime Code of Practice” in the subject line of your message.

Email: info@chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca
Mail: Chemical Substances Web site
c/o Health Canada
Address Locator 4905B
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9
Fax: 613-952-8857

12.0 Review of progress and need for further action

12.1 Five years after publication of this Code in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the Minister of Health will initiate an evaluation of progress achieved towards reducing inhalation exposure to butanone oxime by the general public during interior application of consumer alkyd paint and coating products.

12.2 The review will help determine if other steps or programs are needed to further reduce inhalation exposure to butanone oxime by the general public during interior application of consumer alkyd paint and coating products.

12.3 Periodic reviews of the reduction of inhalation exposure to butanone oxime will occur as needed after the five-year review is completed.

13.0 References

Chang, John, C. S., Zhishi Guo, Leslie E. Sparks (1998). “Exposure and Emission Evaluations of Methyl Ethyl Ketoxime (MEKO) in Alkyd Paints”, Indoor air, 8: 295–300.

Danish Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Project No. 884, 2003, “Substitution of Cobalt Dryers and Methyl Ethyl Ketoxime”. Available from http://www2.mst.dk/common/Udgivramme/Frame.asp?http://www2.mst.dk/udgiv/Publications/2004/87-7614-097-0/html/kap01.htm.

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (2000) EPA-744-F-00-011, “Healthy Indoor Painting Practices”. Available from www.epa.gov/oppt/exposure/pubs/inpaint5.pdf.

Appendix 1: Reporting Form for the Code of Practice for 2-Butanone, oxime (Butanone oxime) Associated with the Interior Application of Consumer Alkyd Paint and Coating Products

This form may be used as a template to provide information to Health Canada in respect to section 10 of the Code of Practice.

Section A — Contact Information

(a) Name and civic address of the person providing information or duly authorized representative

Name: _________________________________________

Participating Company Name: _________________________________________

Civic Address: _________________________________________

Date of Submission: _________________________________________

(b) General/Technical contact for the company/facility (if different from authorized representative). This contact information will be used by Health Canada to correspond with your company/facility on items related to your submission.

Name: _________________________________________

Email: _________________________________________

Position/Job Title: _________________________________________

Telephone Number (with area code): _________________________________________

Section B — Information to be submitted

1. Provide the name of each product subject to the Code 2. Indicate if butanone oxime has been removed and replaced by another substance (provide product name or CAS Registry Number of replacement, if possible) 3. Concentration of butanone oxime (%) by weight (w/w%) 4. Label information demonstrating that section 8.0 has been implemented (may include any additional ventilation statements on the label). 5. Consumer education information including specific statements and means of communication (for example, label, website, pamphlet) that demonstrate section 9 of the Code has been adopted.
         
         
         
         

Section C — Signature

I declare this report to be accurate and complete.

_________________________________
Submitter Name (print)

_________________________________
Submitter Title

_________________________________
Telephone

_________________________________
Email

_________________________________
Submitter Signature

_________________________________
Date of Signature

Section D — Request for Confidentiality

Please identify specific sections that are requested to be treated as confidential.

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CONTROLLED DRUGS AND SUBSTANCES ACT

Notice to interested parties — Tamper resistance under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

Introduction

This notice offers interested parties the opportunity to provide input on proposed new regulations under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act that would require products containing specified controlled substances, or classes thereof, to have tamper-resistant properties in order to be sold in Canada. The Minister of Health intends to propose that controlled-release oxycodone be subject to the proposed new tamper-resistance regulations.

Background: Prescription drug abuse

Prescription drug abuse has emerged as a significant public health concern in Canada. Prescription drugs now rank third among the most commonly abused substances among Canadian youth, after alcohol and marijuana. Prescription drug abuse can lead to addiction, overdose and death, and is damaging to Canadian families and communities by threatening public health and safety. Among the most commonly abused prescription drugs are opioid pain relievers, which contain controlled substances such as oxycodone, fentanyl and morphine. Canadian consumption of prescribed opioids has quadrupled since 2000. Opioid products come in several presentations, including immediate release tablets, controlled-release tablets, solutions for injection, and patches. All forms can be abused. However, controlled-release tablets and patches typically include higher amounts of the active ingredient, making them more attractive for abuse. The development of drug formulations with tamper-resistant properties, i.e. properties that resist crushing, cutting, chewing, dissolution or other forms of tampering, is suggested to be one of several approaches that could help deter abuse.

Regulatory proposal

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, with its dual purpose of protecting public health and maintaining public safety, provides the Minister of Health with tools to restrict or prohibit activities with controlled substances and may be used to require that a drug containing a controlled substance have certain qualities, such as tamper-resistant properties.

The Minister of Health intends to propose regulations that would require that products containing specified controlled substances, or classes thereof, listed on a schedule, have tamper-resistant properties in order for activities with these substances, such as sale, to be authorized in Canada. Under the proposed regulatory approach,

  • The proposed regulations would set out criteria for tamper-resistant properties.
  • Products containing a controlled substance (or class thereof) listed on a schedule to the regulations would have to meet those criteria.
  • For products that contain controlled substances that are included in the new schedule, a manufacturer would have to submit scientific information to the Minister to demonstrate that the regulatory criteria for tamper-resistant properties have been met.
  • The Minister would have decision-making authority to determine whether the criteria for tamper-resistant properties have been met and, in effect, allow the product to be sold in Canada. The Minister’s approval of the tamper-resistant properties of a drug would be tied to the appropriate dealer’s licensing scheme under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, which would remain separate from the Notice of Compliance process under the Food and Drugs Act from a regulatory decision-making perspective. However, Health Canada would strive to streamline the processes from an operational perspective.
  • Health Canada would develop a guidance document for drug manufacturers to communicate the type of scientific studies and information that the Minister would expect to receive in order to determine compliance with the new regulatory criteria for tamper-resistant properties. A manufacturer would still be required to submit scientific evidence of any pharmaceutical product’s safety, efficacy and quality as required by the Food and Drugs Act and its regulations.

The Minister also intends to propose that controlled-release oxycodone be added to the schedule to the proposed regulations.

Below are the concepts of what could be included as criteria for tamper-resistant properties in proposed regulations.

A tamper-resistant formulation is a product formulated with measures intended to reduce the likelihood of successfully tampering with the product for the purposes of abuse, as demonstrated by appropriate, controlled, in vitro and clinical studies.

A tamper-resistant formulation must satisfy the criteria set out in (1) and (2) below.

(1) A tamper-resistant formulation

  • (a) contains a medicinal ingredient that is a controlled substance which is inactive until it is processed inside the human body;
  • (b) is formulated such that physical manipulation for the purposes of misuse will result in the release of a substance which counteracts the biologic activity of the medicinal ingredient;
  • (c) is formulated such that physical manipulation for the purposes of misuse produces an unpleasant or aversive effect in the user;
  • (d) when crushed or broken using manual or mechanical means, retains in vivo controlled-release properties of the intact tablet via one or more routes of administration and
    • (i) when crushed or broken using manual or mechanical means, retains in vitro controlled-release properties of the intact tablet despite extractions in commonly available household solvents, or
    • (ii) when crushed or broken using manual or mechanical means and dissolved in water or any substance which could be injected intravenously in humans, forms a viscous substance which cannot be drawn into a syringe and so injected; or
  • (e) contains a mechanism other than (a), (b), (c) or (d) above intended to confer tamper-resistant properties.

(2) When tampered with and administered to humans via one or more routes of administration, it results in reduced drug liking relative to a non-tamper-resistant formulation of the same medicinal ingredient or of an alternative formulation or preparation of the same or different medicinal ingredient that meets established criteria that are considered to be acceptable as a surrogate for reduced drug liking.

Questions to guide input from interested parties

Below are key questions for which Health Canada is particularly interested in receiving input. However, all input is welcome and should not be limited to responses to these questions.

1. Do you think that tamper-resistant products have a role to play within the Government of Canada’s comprehensive strategy on addressing prescription drug abuse?

2. Should all controlled-release oxycodone products be subject to a tamper-resistant regulation or only a subset of these products, for example those above a certain strength? Please provide a rationale or evidence to support your response.

3. Are there other controlled substances, or classes thereof, that you feel should be required to have tamper-resistant properties before they are allowed to be sold in Canada? If possible, please provide a rationale or evidence to support your response.

4. What criteria or evidence should be taken into consideration when determining which controlled substances should require tamper-resistant properties in order to be sold in Canada?

5. Are the criteria outlined above for tamper-resistant properties appropriate?

6. How can tamper-resistant products be assessed in terms of their ability to effectively deter abuse?

7. What is the appropriate lead time required for the pharmaceutical supply chain to prepare for a requirement that a drug containing a controlled substance, or class thereof, have tamper-resistant properties in order to be sold in Canada, if that drug is already on the market?

8. Beyond their potential ability to curb abuse, what other impacts both positive and negative could potentially result from mandating tamper-resistant properties as a condition of sale on select pharmaceuticals that are at high risk for abuse and diversion?

9. Are there particular circumstances or scenarios under which exceptions to the proposed regulations should be authorized?

10. Are there any other comments you wish to offer to inform the Government’s position on this issue?

The publication of this notice begins a 60-day comment period. Contributions can be sent by email at tamper.resistance@hc-sc.gc.ca, or by mail at 150 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway, Main Statistics Canada Building, Address Locator: 0302A, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

June 28, 2014

ROBERT IANIRO
Director General
Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

La Chambre de Commerce du district de Malartic Inc.

Notice is hereby given that His Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated May 29, 2014, has been pleased to change the name of La Chambre de Commerce du district de Malartic Inc. to La Chambre de commerce et de l’industrie du district de Malartic inc. upon petition made therefor under section 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

June 16, 2014

VIRGINIE ETHIER
Director

For the Minister of Industry

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

Prince Albert Chamber of Commerce

Notice is hereby given that His Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated May 29, 2014, has been pleased to change the name of the Prince Albert Chamber of Commerce to the Prince Albert and District Chamber of Commerce and to change its boundaries to Prince Albert and Shellbrook upon petition made therefor under sections 4 and 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

June 18, 2014

VIRGINIE ETHIER
Director

For the Minister of Industry

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Application for surrender of charter

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of subsection 32(2) of the Canada Corporations Act, an application for surrender of charter was received from

File No. Name of Company Received
446257-2 IHE CANADA 12/05/2014

June 19, 2014

VIRGINIE ETHIER
Director

For the Minister of Industry

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNALS SUPPORT SERVICE OF CANADA

Chief Administrator (full-time position)

Salary range: From $198,000 to $233,900
Location: National Capital Region

The Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada will be a single integrated organization that will provide a full range of high-quality support services to 11 designated federal administrative tribunals, while fully preserving the tribunals’ decision-making independence on adjudicative and case-related matters.

The Chief Administrator will ensure the provision of professional level administrative, management and other support services through the effective and efficient use of human, financial and material resources to the Canada Agricultural Review Tribunal, the Canada Industrial Relations Board, the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal, the Competition Tribunal, the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal, the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board, the Specific Claims Tribunal, the Social Security Tribunal and the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada.

The ideal candidate would have a university degree in a relevant field of study, or a combination of equivalent education, job-related training and experience. A law degree would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have significant management experience at the senior executive level in a public or private sector organization, as well as experience in the management of financial and human resources. Demonstrated experience in managing the operations of large, complex public or private sector organizations is desired. The ideal candidate would have experience in negotiating complex issues among a variety of stakeholders with competing objectives, as well as demonstrated decision-making experience at a senior level with respect to sensitive administrative issues. He or she would also have experience in providing strategic advice on complex and sensitive matters. Executive level management experience in a legal, administrative tribunal or judicial context would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would be knowledgeable about the mandate, role and responsibilities of the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, including its governing legislation, as well as about the federal government and the functions and responsibilities as deputy head of a department for purposes of the Federal Accountability Act, the Public Service Employment Act and related statutes and regulations. Knowledge of the role of administrative tribunals in Canada, and of sound business practices and principles, including human resources and financial management, as well as of good corporate governance are also desired.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to analyze differing opinions and complex situations and respond strategically and reasonably with a view to making recommendations that are fair and equitable, as well as the ability to make sound decisions and to provide corporate leadership and vision, in order to ensure employees remain highly motivated and maintain morale. He or she would have the ability to engage and maintain appropriate co-operative relationships with administrative tribunal chairpersons and members and possess the ability to exercise transparency, probity and accountability in the management of resources. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, are also desired.

The ideal candidate would demonstrate tact, diplomacy and discretion, as well as possess high ethical standards and integrity. He or she would be a strong visionary leader who has sound judgment and superior interpersonal skills and who can inspire others. Finally, the ideal candidate would be decisive, innovative and action-oriented.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by July 21, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADA REVENUE AGENCY

Director (part-time position)

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is a large and complex organization that touches the lives of Canadians every day. Its mission is to administer tax, benefits and related programs and to ensure compliance on behalf of governments across Canada, thereby contributing to the ongoing economic and social well-being of Canadians. The CRA has a workforce of approximately 40 000 employees located across Canada with an annual budget of over $4 billion. The CRA processed almost $419 billion in taxes and duties in 2012–2013, and issued 111 million benefit and credit payments, totalling approximately $21 billion, for federal, provincial and territorial, and Aboriginal governments. The CRA’s governance structure comprises a Minister, a Commissioner and Chief Executive Officer, and a Board of Management, as defined in the Canada Revenue Agency Act.

The Board of Management was established in 1999 to support the Agency in achieving its mission and mandate. It is composed of 15 appointed members, including the Chair and the Commissioner. The Board provides strategic guidance and oversees the organization and administration of the CRA as well as the management of its resources, services, property, personnel and contracts. It is expected to bring a forward-looking, strategic perspective to the CRA’s operations and foster sound management and service delivery.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or business experience. Training in board governance would be an asset.

The qualified candidate would have experience in board discussions and significant senior-level expertise in the area of information technology, human resources management or management experience in large operational organizations.

The successful candidate must be able to develop and maintain constructive relationships and facilitate information-sharing and meaningful dialogue among board members, the senior management team, and senior government officials. The preferred candidate will have personal and professional integrity, excellent interpersonal skills, sound judgement, tact and discretion as well as the ability to be objective.

The ideal candidate would be knowledgeable about the roles and responsibilities of a director and the CRA’s Board of Management. The position also requires knowledge of the CRA’s mandate and of the legislative framework within which it operates. Knowledge of the current best practices in corporate governance is needed.

Proficiency in both official languages is preferred.

The successful candidate must be willing to travel to attend Board meetings.

Pursuant to the CRA’s enabling legislation, the Director of the Board must be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Moreover, the incumbent must not be a member of the Senate or House of Commons or a member of a provincial or territorial legislature, or be employed on a full-time basis in the public service of Canada or of a province or territory.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “General Information” and “Forms and Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to identify qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the CRA and its activities can be found at www.cra-arc.gc.ca. For specific information regarding the Board of Management, please go to www.cra-arc.gc.ca/board.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by Friday, July 11, 2014, to the Corporate Secretary to the Board of Management, Corporate Secretariat, Connaught Building, 555 MacKenzie Avenue, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L5, 613-954-0500 (fax), Tara.Cosgrove@cra-arc.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE TRIBUNAL

Member (full-time position)

Salary range: $141,300–$166,200
Location: National Capital Region

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (the Tribunal) is an adjudicative body reporting to Parliament through the Minister of Finance. The Chairperson and the members of the Tribunal conduct injury inquiries into dumping and subsidy complaints, hear appeals of decisions of the Canada Border Services Agency and the Canada Revenue Agency, inquire into complaints from potential suppliers under various trade agreements concerning all federal government procurement, conduct safeguard inquiries, and provide advice to the Government and/or to the Minister of Finance on economic, trade and tariff issues. In doing so, the Tribunal supports the Government’s trade and economic agenda while ensuring that Canada’s rights and obligations under various trade agreements are honoured.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in business, public administration, economics or law, or an acceptable combination of relevant education, job-related training and/or experience.

The ideal candidate would have experience in dealing with complex and sensitive issues and decision making in a private or public sector organization. Experience in developing, maintaining and managing successful working relationships is desired. The candidate would also possess experience in the interpretation and application of legislation. Experience in trade policy and/or international economics as well as experience as a member or legal counsel of an adjudicative tribunal would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would have knowledge of the mandate and operations of the Tribunal. He or she would also possess a solid understanding of the procedures and practices involved in conducting an adjudicative hearing. Knowledge of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act, the Special Import Measures Act, and other relevant domestic legislation and international rules and practices is sought. This candidate would be knowledgeable about administrative law, principles of natural justice and rules and practices followed by administrative tribunals in Canada as well as the international trading system, the World Trade Organization, and the North American Free Trade Agreement. An understanding of the general functioning of a business, including accounting and financial management processes, is also desired.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to analyze complex situations and cases for the purpose of rendering decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term impact. He or she would be able to analyze all aspects of a case, and to interpret and apply the relevant criteria with a view to making lawful and equitable decisions. The ability to conduct a proactive, fair and efficient adjudicative hearing as well as the capacity to work independently and as a team member are sought. The candidate being considered for this position would also possess superior communication skills, both orally and in writing, with the ability to write clear and concise reports, analyses and decisions.

Members of the Tribunal should be flexible and impartial and demonstrate tact, discretion, adaptability and initiative. Superior interpersonal skills, sound judgement, high ethical standards and integrity are also desired.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance. A member shall not accept or hold any office or employment inconsistent with his or her duties.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the Tribunal and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.citt-tcce.gc.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by July 21, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at May 31, 2014

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

5.2

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

5.4

 
   

5.4

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

22,976.1

 

Government of Canada bonds

69,301.0

 

Other investments

351.6

 
   

92,628.7

Property and equipment

 

238.0

Intangible assets

 

47.6

Other assets

 

219.2

 

93,144.1


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

65,534.9

Deposits

Government of Canada

25,257.3

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

150.2

 

Other deposits

1,188.6

 
   

26,596.1

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

569.1

 
   

569.1

   

92,700.1

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

314.0

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

444.0

93,144.1

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, June 16, 2014

S. VOKEY
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, June 16, 2014

STEPHEN S. POLOZ
Governor

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