ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 30 — July 26, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2014-66-07-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 66(2) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), makes the annexed Order 2014-66-07-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, July 9, 2014

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2014-66-07-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENTS

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

825-85-4 1200-03-9 1472-93-1 1891-67-4 2127-03-9 3891-98-3 9079-59-8 10138-32-6 13481-97-5 16062-88-7 25584-58-1 25601-41-6 32441-45-5 33527-91-2 35194-30-0 37811-72-6 37995-02-1 39202-17-0 40949-94-8 53605-94-0 56138-10-4 64417-98-7 84606-45-1 91001-61-5 649747-80-8 850997-10-3 864910-70-3 957209-18-6 957774-85-5 1174627-68-9 1240316-06-6 1246861-40-4 1256265-83-4 1292781-82-8 1315250-65-7 1315250-67-9 1315251-11-6 1338815-87-4 1339119-15-1 1351148-32-7 1374861-00-3 1379527-22-6 1392276-61-7 1392277-05-2 1415237-51-2 1415313-86-8 1417785-12-6 1428547-20-9 1431149-53-9 1434128-32-1 1447806-11-2 1448854-07-6 1448854-23-6 1449215-95-5 1450911-80-4 1471997-95-1 1471997-96-2

2. Part II of the List is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

18630-0 3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 2-amino-4-alkyl-5-[(1E)-2-[4-nitro-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]diazenyl]-6-(phenylamino)-
  2-Amino-4-alkyl-5-[(1E)-2-[4-nitro-2-(trifluorométhyl)phényl]diazényl]-6-(phénylamino)pyridine-3-carbonitrile
18631-1 3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 6-amino-4-alkyl-5-[(1E)-2-[4-nitro-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-(phenylamino)
  6-Amino-4-alkyl-5-[(1E)-2-[4-nitro-2-(trifluorométhyl)phényl]diazényl]-2-(phénylamino)pyridine-3-carbonitrile
18632-2 Cuprate (4-), [2-[2-[[2-[3-amino-2-(hydroxy-kappa-O)-5-sulfonyl]diazenyl-kappa-N2](4-sulfophenyl)alkyl]diazenyl-kappa-N1]-4-sulfobenzoate (6-)-kappa-O]-, sodium, reaction products with 2-[(3-(ethylamino)phenyl)sulfonyl]ethyl hydrogen sulfate and 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine
  [2-[2-[[2-[3-Amino-2-(hydroxy-kappa-O)-5-sulfonyl]diazényl-kappa-N2](4-sulfophényl)alkyl]diazényl-kappa-N1]-4-sulfobenzoate(6-)-kappa-O]-cuprate(4-), sodium, produits de réaction avec de l’hydrogénosulfate de 2[(3(éthylamino)phényl)sulfonyl]éthyle et de la 2,4,6-trifluoro-[1,3,5]-triazine
18634-4 Benzoic acid, 3,5-diamino-, reaction products with diazotized 2-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl]alkyl hydrogen sulfate and diazotized potassium 2-amino-5-[(2-(sulfooxy)ethyl]sulfonyl]benzenesulfonate (2:1), hydrolyzed, sodium salts
  Acide 3,5-diaminobenzoïque, produits de réaction de l’hydrogénosulfate de 2-[(4-aminophényl)sulfonyl]alkyle diazoté et du 2-amino-5-[(2-(sulfooxy)éthyl]sulfonyl]benzènesulfonate de potassium (1/2) diazoté, hydrolysés, sels de sodium
18641-2 Heteromonocyclic derivative, reaction products with carbopolycyclic chloride and alkanediol
  Dérivé hétéromonocyclique, produits de réaction avec un chlorocarbopolycyclique et un alcanediol
18669-3 Fatty acids, me esters, mixed with vegetable oil, sulfurized
  Esters méthyliques d’acides gras, mélangés avec une huile végétale, sulfurés
18670-4 Hexahydroheteropolycycle
  Hexahydrohétéropolycycle
18679-4 Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-bis(2-methylpropyl) ester, trialkylamine salt
  Phosphorodithioate de O-O-di(2-méthylpropyle), sel de dialkylalcanamine
18684-0 5-(8-[4-(4-(4-[7-(3,5-Dicarboxyphenylazo)-8-hydroxy-3,6-disulphonaphthalen-1-ylamino]-6-hydroxy-[1,3,5]triazin-2-yl)-dimethylheteromonocyclyl)-6-hydroxy-[1,3,5]triazin-2-ylamino]-1-hydroxy-3,6-disulfo-naphthalen-2-ylazo)-isophthalic acid, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen salt
  Acide 5-(8-[4-(4-(4-[7-(3,5-dicarboxyphénylazo)-8-hydroxy-3,6-disulfonaphtalène-1-ylamino]-6-hydroxy- [1,3,5]triazine-2-yl)-diméthylhétorémonocycle-yl)-6-hydroxy-[1,3,5]triazine-2-ylamino]-1-hydroxy-3,6-disulfonaphtalène-2-ylazo)isophtalique, sel d’ammonium, de sodium et acide
18690-6 Resin acids and Rosin acids, alkenoated, esters with alkylpolyol
  Acides résiniques et colophaniques, alcénoatés, sels avec un alcanepolyol

COMING INTO FORCE

3. This Order comes into force on the day on which it is published in the Canada Gazette.

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2014-87-06-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote b), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote c);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote d), makes the annexed Order 2014-87-06-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, July 9, 2014

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2014-87-06-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENT

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 2) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 16415-12-6
  • 25805-16-7
  • 68122-98-5
  • 70983-81-2

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2014-87-06-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 16 aromatic amines specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 3 of the 16 aromatic amines identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on 3 of the 16 aromatic amines, benzenamine, 2-chloro-; benzenamine, 3,4-dichloro-; and 1,3-benzenediamine, pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on the remaining 13 aromatic amines pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the 16 aromatic amines do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action under section 77 of the Act on benzenamine, 2-chloro-; benzenamine, 3,4-dichloro-; and 1,3-benzenediamine at this time.

And notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining 13 aromatic amines at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Aromatic Amines

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 16 aromatic amines. These substances constitute the Aromatic Amines subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan based on similar chemical structures and application. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for action, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN), (see footnote 3) Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and common names of the 16 substances in the Aromatic Amines subgroup are presented in the following table.

Identity of the 16 substances in the Aromatic Amines subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Common name used in this report
88-53-9 (see note 1) Benzenesulfonic acid, 2-amino-5-chloro-4-methyl- Red Lake C Amine
90-04-0(see note 2),(see note 3) Benzenamine, 2-methoxy- o-Anisidine
91-59-8 (see note 4),(see note 5) 2-Naphthalenamine 2-Naphthylamine
95-51-2 Benzenamine, 2-chloro- 2-Chloroaniline
95-53-4 (see note 6),(see note 7) Benzenamine, 2-methyl- o-Toluidine
95-76-1 Benzenamine, 3,4-dichloro- 3,4-Dichloroaniline
95-80-7 (see note 8),(see note 9) 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4-methyl- 2,4-Diaminotoluene
100-01-6 (see note 10) Benzenamine, 4-nitro- 4-Nitroaniline
106-47-8 (see note 11),(see note 12) Benzenamine, 4-chloro- 4-Chloroaniline
106-49-0 (see note 13) Benzenamine, 4-methyl- p-Toluidine
108-45-2 1,3-Benzenediamine 1,3-Diaminobenzene
123-30-8 (see note 14) Phenol, 4-amino- p-Aminophenol
156-43-4 (see note 15) Benzenamine, 4-ethoxy- p-Phenetidine
540-23-8 (see note 16) Benzenamine, 4-methyl-, hydrochloride p-Toluidine hydrochloride
541-69-5 (see note 17) 1,3-Benzenediamine, dihydrochloride 1,3-Diaminobenzene dihydrochloride
615-05-4 (see note 18),(see note 19) 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4-methoxy- 2,4-Diaminoanisole
  • Note 1
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 2
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 3
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 4
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 5
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 6
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 7
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 8
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 9
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 10
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 11
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 12
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 13
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 14
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 15
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 16
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 17
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 18
    Denotes that the aromatic amine is part of the 22 aromatic amines (EU22) that are regulated in Europe under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation for their use in azo colourants for textiles and leather.
  • Note 19
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

The 16 aromatic amines are industrial chemicals primarily used as chemical intermediates in the synthesis of pigments, dyes, pesticides, drugs and rubber products, as well as in laboratory chemicals. No manufacturing activity of any of the 16 aromatic amines in Canada was reported above the 100 kg/year threshold, according to recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA 1999. Seven of the aromatic amines have been reported as being imported into Canada above the 100 kg/year survey reporting threshold. An additional two aromatic amines were reported as being imported into Canada, but they were below the 100 kg/year reporting threshold. Other sources of exposure to certain aromatic amines include cigarette smoke.

Environment

The 16 aromatic amines are soluble in water. In terms of potential releases to water, sediment and soil, given the physical and chemical properties of these substances, aromatic amines will bind to dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and sediment over time; however, water is considered the primary route of exposure.

Available experimental and modelled data regarding the abiotic and biotic degradation of the 16 aromatic amines indicate that these substances are persistent in water, sediment and soil. Information on the log octanol–water partition coefficients and fish bioconcentration factors indicates that these substances are not likely to bioconcentrate or bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms.

There is a wide range of acute and chronic aquatic toxicity data for the aromatic amines (median effective concentrations [EC50] or median lethal concentrations [LC50]: 0.0004–418 mg/L). The toxicity of substituted aniline compounds is dependent on their mode of action, the type of substituents (chloro-, methyl-, etc.), the number of substituents (mono-, di-, etc.) and their position (ortho-, meta-, para-). Aquatic invertebrates (Daphnia) were more sensitive than other organisms to aromatic amines. Limited toxicity data were available for terrestrial and sediment-dwelling organisms.

Aquatic exposure scenarios were developed to represent the potential major environmental releases due to industrial and consumer activities involving the aromatic amines. Predicted environmental concentrations were calculated for the aquatic environment for these substances released from tire manufacturing, tire wear, cosmetics formulation and consumer use of cosmetics. The probability that the predicted environmental concentration of aromatic amines would exceed the substances’ predicted no-effect concentration was low (~5% or less) for all four scenarios, meaning little harm is expected to be caused to aquatic organisms as a result of these industrial and consumer activities.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from aromatic amines. It is proposed to conclude that the 16 aromatic amines in this assessment do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

This human health assessment focuses on substances that are reported above the reporting threshold of 100 kg/year in the recent surveys conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 or for which available information indicates potential exposure of the general population of Canada. Potential exposure of the general population of Canada was characterized for nine substances: 2-naphthylamine, o-toluidine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, 4-chloroaniline, 3,4-dichloroaniline, o-anisidine, p-aminophenol, 1,3-diaminobenzene and Red Lake C Amine. Exposure of the general population of Canada to one or more of the nine aromatic amines from the use of certain consumer products, such as cooking utensils, textiles and cosmetics, was estimated. No robust Canadian data on concentrations of these nine aromatic amines in environmental media were identified, and, with the exception of p-aminophenol, section 71 data indicate low volumes of use of these nine aromatic amines in Canada. Therefore, exposure to the aromatic amines from environmental media is generally considered to be low. Exposure was not expected for the remaining seven aromatic amines in this subgroup; this includes those not reported under section 71 and those with no other information identified to support exposure data.

Carcinogenicity and/or genotoxicity were considered to be the health effects of concern for six of the nine aromatic amines for which exposure was characterized. 2-Naphthylamine, o-toluidine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, 4-chloroaniline and o-anisidine are classified as known or possible human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (Group 1 or 2B) and the European Union (Category 1A or 1B). In addition, carcinogenicity was considered a potential health effect of concern of 3,4-dichloroaniline based on health effects of the related substance, 4-chloroaniline. Carcinogenicity and genotoxicity were not identified as the endpoints of concern for p-aminophenol, 1,3-diaminobenzene or Red Lake C Amine; therefore, critical non-cancer health effect levels were selected for risk characterization.

Four substances (2-naphthylamine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, 4-chloroaniline and o-anisidine) were detected in some imported textile and leather products in a study conducted by Health Canada in 2012. Margins between critical effect levels and estimates of exposure of the general population from dermal contact with textiles as well as mouthing of textiles by infants are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Available information indicates that residual o-toluidine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, o-anisidine, 4-chloroaniline and 1,3-diaminobenzene may migrate to foods being prepared with polyamide cooking utensils. Margins between critical effect levels and the estimated daily oral exposure from use of polyamide cooking utensils are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Exposure to p-aminophenol, 1,3-diaminobenzene, 4-chloroaniline and Red Lake C Amine was identified from the use of certain cosmetic products. The margins between exposure estimates and critical effect levels for each of these substances were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

o-Toluidine was identified at low levels in breast milk from a small sample of Canadian women. The margin between the critical effect level and the estimated daily intake of o-toluidine for nonformula-fed infants via breast milk is considered adequate and does not indicate a concern at these low levels of exposure.

For the remaining seven aromatic amines (2,4-diaminoanisole, 2-chloroaniline, p-toluidine, p-toluidine hydrochloride, 4-nitroaniline, p-phenetidine and 1,3-diaminobenzene dihydrochloride), based on available information, exposure to the general population of Canada is not expected. Therefore, the risk to human health from these substances is considered to be low.

Based on the available information presented in this draft Screening Assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 16 aromatic amines evaluated in this assessment are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

It is therefore proposed to conclude that the above-mentioned 16 substances do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 16 aromatic amines in this draft Screening Assessment do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Consideration for follow-up

In Canada, 14 of the 16 aromatic amines are considered to have high human health hazard potential (2-naphthylamine, o-toluidine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, 4-chloroaniline, o-anisidine, 2,4-diaminoanisole, 3,4-dichloroaniline, 2-chloroaniline, p-toluidine, p-toluidine hydrochloride, p-aminophenol, 1,3-diaminobenzene, 1,3-diaminobenzene dihydrochloride and p-phenetidine). Exposure of the general population to these substances is not of concern at current levels of exposure. However, there may be health concerns if uses resulting in human exposure in any subpopulation were to increase.

To ensure consistency across the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping, options on how best to monitor changes in the use profile of these substances will be investigated when the assessments for all of the substances in this grouping are completed.

The draft Screening Assessment is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 33 azo basic dyes specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 29 of the 33 azo basic dyes identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on 29 of the 33 azo basic dyes pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on 2,6-pyridinediamine, 3-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride; 1,3-benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride; 1,3-benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monoacetate; and 1,3benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, acetate pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these 33 azo basic dyes do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the En-vironment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on 2,6-pyridinediamine, 3-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride; 1,3-benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride; 1,3-benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monoacetate; and 1,3-benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, acetate at this time.

And notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action under section 77 of the Act on the remaining 29 azo basic dyes at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Azo Basic Dyes

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 33 azo basic dyes. These substances constitute the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on similar chemical structures and applications. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for action, as they met categorization criteria under subsec-tion 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.

An assessment to determine whether one basic dye (NDTHPM) met one or more criteria under section 64 of CEPA 1999 was previously conducted under the Challenge initiative of the CMP. It was concluded that NDTHPM did not meet the criteria under section 64 of CEPA 1999. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number, (see footnote 4) Domestic Substances List names and Colour Index or generic names (if applicable) of the 33 azo basic dyes are presented in the following table.

Identity of the 33 substances in the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or generic name
136-40-3 (see note 20) 2,6-Pyridinediamine, 3-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride N/A
532-82-1 (see note 21) 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monohydrochloride Basic Orange 2
2869-83-2 Phenazinium, 3-(diethylamino)-7-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-5-phenyl-, chloride N/A
4608-12-2 Phenazinium, 3-(dimethylamino)-7-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-5-phenyl-, chloride N/A
4618-88-6 Phenazinium, 3-amino-7-[[4-(dimethylamino) phenyl]azo]-5-phenyl-, chloride N/A
10114-58-6 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4,4′-[1,3-phenylenebis(azo)]bis-, dihydrochloride Basic Brown 1
10189-42-1 Pyridinium, 1-[2-[[4-[[2,6-dichloro-4-[(dimethylamino) sulfonyl]phenyl]azo]phenyl]ethylamino] ethyl]-, chloride N/A
14408-20-9 Pyridinium, 1-[2-[[4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl] ethylamino]ethyl]-, chloride N/A
14970-39-9 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, 5-[[4-(diethylamino) phenyl]azo]-1,4-dimethyl-, trichlorozincate(1-) N/A
23408-72-2 Benzothiazolium, 2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl] azo]-3-ethyl-6-methoxy-, trichlorozincate(1-) N/A
29508-48-3 1H-Pyrazolium, 1,5-dimethyl-3-[(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)azo]-2-phenyl-, methyl sulfate N/A
36986-04-6 Pyridinium, 1-[2-[[4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl] ethylamino]ethyl]-, chloride N/A
52769-39-8 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, dimethyl-3-[[4-[methyl(phenylmethyl) amino]phenyl]azo]-, trichlorozincate(1-) N/A
59709-10-3 Pyridinium, 1-[2-[[4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl] ethylamino]ethyl]-, acetate N/A
63589-49-1 1H-Pyrazolium, 2-cyclohexyl-3-[[4-(diethylamino)phenyl] azo]-1-methyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
63681-54-9 Benzenesulfonic acid, dodecyl-, compd. with 4-(phenylazo)-1,3-benzenediamine (1:1) N/A
65150-98-3 Thiazolium, 2-[[4-(diethylamino)phenyl] azo]-3-methyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
68929-07-7 Benzothiazolium, 2-[[4-[ethyl(2-hydroxyethyl)amino] phenyl]azo]-5-methoxy-3-methyl-, methyl sulfate (salt) N/A
68936-17-4 1H-Imidazolium, 2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-1,3-dimethyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
69852-41-1 Benzothiazolium, 2-[[4-[ethyl(2-hydroxyethyl)amino] phenyl]azo]6-methoxy-3-methyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
71032-95-6 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7-[[4,6-bis[[3-(diethylamino)propyl] amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-, monoacetate (salt) NDTHPM
72361-40-1 Pyridinium, 1-[2-[[4-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-3-methylphenyl]ethylamino]ethyl]-, chloride N/A
72379-36-3 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, 5-[[4-[ethyl(phenylmethyl)amino]phenyl]azo]-1,4-dimethyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
72379-37-4 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, 3-[[4-[ethyl(phenylmethyl)amino]phenyl]azo]-1,2-dimethyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
74744-63-1 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, 3,3′(or 5,5′)-[1,2-ethanediylbis[(ethylimino)4,1-phenyleneazo]]bis[1,4-dimethyl-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (1:1) N/A
75199-20-1 1,3′-Bipyridinium, 1′,2′-dihydro-6′-hydroxy-3,4′-dimethyl-2′-oxo-5′-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-, chloride N/A
75660-25-2 (see note 22) 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, monoacetate N/A
79234-33-6 (see note 23) 1,3-Benzenediamine, 4-(phenylazo)-, acetate N/A
83969-13-5 1,3,4-Thiadiazolium, 5-[bis(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl] azo]-3-methyl-, sulfate (2:1) N/A
85114-37-0 1H-1,2,4-Triazolium, 1,4-dimethyl3(or 5)-[[4-[methyl(phenylmethyl) amino]phenyl]azo]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
85480-88-2 Benzothiazolium, 3-(3-amino-3-oxopropyl)-2-[(1-ethyl-2-phenyl-1H-indol-3-yl)azo]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1) N/A
93783-70-1 1,3,4-Thiadiazolium, 5-[bis(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-3-methyl-, trichlorozincate(1-) N/A
125329-01-3 Propanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-, compd. with 7-[[4,6-bis[[3-(diethylamino)propyl] amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (1:1) N/A

Abbreviations: CAS RN, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number; N/A, not applicable.

  • Note 20
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 21
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 22
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Note 23
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

For the purposes of this draft Screening Assessment, the 33 substances considered are collectively referred to as “azo basic dyes.”

The 33 azo basic dyes are not expected to occur naturally in the environment. No manufacturing activity of any of the 33 azo basic dyes in Canada was reported above the 100 kg/year threshold, according to recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA 1999. Six substances have been reported as being imported into Canada above the 100 kg/year survey reporting threshold.

Environment

Azo basic dyes have moderate to high water solubility (0.1–340 g/L). Azo basic dyes are expected to settle out of the water column to bed sediments or wastewater sludge. Modelled biodegradation data for azo basic dyes predict that these substances would biodegrade slowly in water under aerobic conditions. In sediment and soil, biodegradation is also expected to be slow under aerobic conditions and fast under anaerobic conditions. Azo basic dyes may degrade and transform to certain aromatic amines if they reach anaerobic environments.

Azo basic dyes are not expected to bioaccumulate given their physical and chemical properties (i.e. low log octanol–water partition coefficients, ionized at relevant environmental pH, moderate molar weights, relatively large cross-sectional diameters and moderate to high water solubilities).

Azo basic dyes were divided into seven subsets based on their physical and chemical properties, and the critical toxicity value for the most sensitive ecological subset was derived from the most sensitive valid experimental value. Most substances had median lethal concentrations (LC50 values) that ranged between 0.3 and 13 mg/L for aquatic organisms. Based on the experimental and read-across data and the low critical toxicity values for each subset, it is concluded that azo basic dyes may be expected to be hazardous to aquatic organisms at moderate concentrations (i.e. LC50 <10 mg/L). Based on limited empirical soil toxicity data, azo basic dyes are not expected to cause harm to soil-dwelling organisms at low concentrations.

Given that the water column is the major environmental compartment for the presence of azo basic dyes, aquatic exposure analyses were focused on scenarios representing potential major environmental releases due to industrial activities that may result in high levels of exposure of aquatic organisms. Predicted environmental concentrations were calculated for the aquatic environment for those substances used in chemical formulation, paper dyeing, textile dyeing and pharmaceutical production processes. The predicted environmental concentrations were derived in the form of probabilistic distributions due to the variability and uncertainty in several contributing variables. The probability that the predicted environmental concentrations of azo basic dyes exceeded the predicted no-effect concentration was very low in all four scenarios.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft Screening Assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from azo basic dyes. It is proposed to conclude that the 33 azo basic dyes in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

With respect to human health, the current screening assessment addresses 32 of 33 substances in the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup. The remaining substance, NDTHPM, was previously assessed and a conclusion was published under the Challenge initiative of the CMP. As significant new information was not identified for NDTHPM, the human health risk assessment for this substance has not been updated.

Exposure of the general population of Canada to the substances in the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup from environmental media is not considered to be significant.

Of the 32 substances for which conclusions have been drawn, 12 substances in the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup have been identified as being present in certain products (paper products, textiles, drugs and cosmetics) in Canada that may result in exposure of the general population.

The margins between the upper-bounding estimate of dermal exposure to Basic Orange 2 in hair dye and the short-term critical health effect in rats are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. The margin of exposure derived for Basic Orange 2 through dermal contact with hair dye is considered to be protective of exposure via pen ink.

Potential exposure and risk to human health from exposure to the substances bearing CAS RNs 75660-25-2 and 52769-39-8, through incidental ingestion of paper products by toddlers, is not expected to be significant. The substance bearing CAS RN 52769-39-8 is not considered to pose a high hazard to human health based on the absence of indications for health effects of concern and its limited potential for exposure.

Exposure to the substances bearing CAS RNs 14408-20-9, 36986-04-6, 59709-10-3, 68929-07-7, 69852-41-1 and 93783-70-1 may occur through dermal and oral contact with textiles as well as oral ingestion of paper. No health effects data were identified for these substances in the Azo Basic Dyes subgroup, nor were appropriate analogues identified. There were no indications of high hazard for azo reductive cleavage products. Therefore, the risk of dermal exposure to and incidental ingestion of textiles or paper containing substances bearing CAS RNs 14408-20-9, 36986-04-6, 59709-10-3, 68929-07-7, 69852-41-1 and 93783-70-1 for the general population of Canada is not considered to be significant.

It is therefore proposed to conclude that the above azo basic dyes being evaluated in this assessment do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999. In addition, there are no updates to the assessment and conclusion made with respect to paragraph 64(c) for NDTHPM, previously considered by the Government of Canada under the Challenge initiative of the CMP.

Overall proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that the 33 azo basic dyes considered in this assessment do not meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Considerations for follow-up

Although a concern for human health has not been identified for the general population of Canada at current levels of exposure, seven of the azo basic dyes in the subgroup (Basic Brown 1, Basic Orange 2, and the dyes bearing CAS RN 136-40-3, CAS RN 63681-54-9, CAS RN 75199-20-1, CAS RN 75660-25-2 and CAS RN 125329-01-3) are recognized for their high human health hazard based on their potential carcinogenicity and/or genotoxicity. Similarly, although a concern for human health has not been identified for the general population of Canada with respect to the substances bearing CAS RN 75119-20-1 and CAS RN 125329-01-3, p-aminoazobenzene — recognized for its high human health hazard — may be released upon reductive azo bond cleavage of these substances. There may be a concern for human health if exposure of the general population of Canada to these substances were to increase.

Additionally, there is high uncertainty with the characterization of human health effects hazard for 7 of the 33 azo basic dyes (CAS RN 14408-20-9, CAS RN 36986-04-6, CAS RN 52769-39-8, CAS RN 59709-10-3, CAS RN 68929-07-7, CAS RN 69852-41-1, and CAS RN 93783-70-1) due to a paucity of empirical or predictive data in the health effects database.

To ensure consistency across the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping, options on how best to monitor changes in the use profiles of these substances will be investigated when the assessments for all of the substances in this grouping are completed. Where relevant, research and monitoring will support verification of assumptions used during the screening assessment.

The draft Screening Assessment is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position Order in Council

Bracken, The Hon. J. Keith

2014-860

Government of British Columbia

 

Administrator

 

July 3, July 4 and September 12, 2014

 

Dowdeswell, Elizabeth, O.C.

2014-855

  • Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Ontario
 

Flack, Graham

2014-872

  • Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage
 

Jones, Bill

2014-875

  • Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence to be styled Senior Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence
 

Lucas, Stephen

2014-873

  • Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Plans and Consultations and Intergovernmental Affairs), Privy Council Office
 

Matthews, William

2014-877

  • Comptroller General of Canada
 

Morgan, Marta

2014-876

  • Associate Deputy Minister of Finance
 

Patrice, Michel

2014-856

  • Senate of Canada
 
  • Commissioner to administer oaths
 

Sterling, Lori

2014-874

  • Associate Deputy Minister of Employment and Social Development and Deputy Minister of Labour
 

Swords, Colleen

2014-871

  • Deputy Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to be styled Deputy Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
 

Watson, The Hon. Jack

2014-869

  • Government of Alberta
 
  • Administrator
 
  • July 6 to July 10, 2014
 

Wernick, Michael

2014-870

  • Privy Council Office
 
  • Senior Advisor
 

Wister, Andrew Victor

 
  • National Seniors Council
 
  • Member

2014-878

  • and
 
  • Chairperson

2014-879

July 16, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Hamilton Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Hamilton Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 2001;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to and subject to the terms and conditions of a Lease Agreement between the Authority and Poscor Shred Services Corp., dated August 1, 2003, and Lease Extending and Amending Agreements between the Authority and Poscor Mill Services Corp., dated July 31, 2013, and February 20, 2014, 1520812 Ontario Inc. was assigned the right to purchase a parcel of land forming part of the real property set out in Schedule C of the letters patent (“Real Property”), subject to the issuance of supplementary letters patent;

WHEREAS 1520812 Ontario Inc. wishes to exercise their right to purchase the Real Property;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2) of the Act, the Authority wishes to dispose of the Real Property in favour of 1520812 Ontario Inc.;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to remove reference to the Real Property from Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent of the Authority is consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after the paragraph which begins “TWELFTHLY”:

EXCEPT:

1. Parts 4, 5, and 7, Plan 62R-15661, City of Hamilton

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Wentworth Land Title Office of the documents evidencing the transfer of the Real Property from the Authority to 1520812 Ontario Inc.

ISSUED this 23rd day of June, 2014.

________________________________

The Honourable Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental
Affairs and Minister for the Economic Development Agency of
Canada for the Regions of Quebec, acting for the Honourable
Lisa Raitt, P.C., M.P., Minister of Transport, pursuant to
Order in Council P.C. 2013-895 of August 16, 2013.

[30-1-o]

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Occupational group definitions

Pursuant to paragraph 11.1(1)(b) of the Financial Administration Act, the Treasury Board of Canada hereby provides notice that the following occupational group definitions will apply to the Police Operations Support Group and its sub-groups, effective May 15, 2014. The definitions of the Radio Operations and Electronics Groups, effective March 18, 1999, as published in Part I of the Canada Gazette on March 27, 1999, are revised as follows upon the effective date of the Police Operations Support Group. The definition of the Law Group effective March 18, 1999, as published in Part I of the Canada Gazette on March 27, 1999, is replaced by the following definitions of the Law Management and Law Practitioner Groups effective December 9, 2010.

Police Operations Support Group Definition

The Police Operations Support Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in planning, developing, conducting or managing telecommunications in support of police operations.

Inclusions

The Police Operations Support Group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. planning, developing, conducting or managing telecommunications operations in support of police operations;
  2. planning, developing, conducting or managing lawfully authorized telecommunications interceptions in support of police operations.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Police Operations Support Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group, and for more certainty, those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. operation, routine servicing and minor repair of a variety of cryptographic, facsimile, electronic mail and associated communications equipment in preparing, receiving, transmitting, and relaying messages; and the performance of related activities including recording receipt and dispatch times of traffic, priority allocation and distribution of message copies that require special knowledge of communication procedures, format, schedules, message traffic routes and equipment operation;
  2. operation of electronic equipment to communicate information for the safety of life at sea, the protection of the environment and the efficient movement of marine vessels, and to monitor radio aids to marine navigation, and the provision of associated advisory services;
  3. maintenance and repair of electronic and associated electro-mechanical or electrical equipment.

Telecommunications Operations Sub-Group Definition

The Telecommunications Operations Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in planning, developing, conducting or managing telecommunications operations in support of police operations.

Inclusions

The Telecommunications Operations Sub-Group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. operating, controlling and monitoring police telecommunications systems to respond to public requests for assistance; inputting, retrieving and disseminating information from information management systems; and providing dispatch service and information to support police operations;
  2. analyzing, modifying or developing policies, operating methods or procedures in support of telecommunications operations;
  3. developing or delivering training on operating methods or procedures or the use of specialized equipment for telecommunications operations;
  4. processing protected and non-protected information via electronic systems to and from local, national and international locations;
  5. supervising or managing any of the above activities.

Intercept Monitoring and Analysis Sub-Group Definition

The Intercept Monitoring and Analysis Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in planning, developing, conducting or managing lawfully authorized telecommunications interceptions in support of police operations.

Inclusions

The Intercept Monitoring and Analysis Sub-Group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. recording, monitoring, analyzing or transcribing live or pre-recorded intercepted telecommunications; monitoring and analyzing tracking data, videos and related information systems;
  2. analyzing, modifying or developing policies, operating methods or procedures in support of lawful telecommunications interceptions and monitoring operations;
  3. developing or delivering training on intercept monitoring and transcription responsibilities and procedures, or on the use of specialized communications systems;
  4. supervising or managing any of the above activities.

Radio Operations Group Definition

The Radio Operations Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the operation of electronic equipment to communicate information for the safety of life at sea, the protection of the environment and the efficient movement of marine vessels, and to monitor radio aids to marine navigation, and the provision of associated advisory services.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the operation of radio communications equipment at Marine Communications and Traffic Services Centres or on Canadian Coast Guard ships as a radio operator acting in a relief capacity;
  2. the performance of vessel traffic services at a Marine Communications and Traffic Services Centre;
  3. the planning and development of standards and procedures and the management of communications networks dealing with radio operations and with the delivery of vessel traffic services and flight information services;
  4. the development, direction and delivery of associated training and evaluation programs, and the issuance of certificates through legislative delegation;
  5. the analysis and evaluation of proposals from NAV CANADA and other flight information service providers; and
  6. the leadership of radio operations and vessel traffic services at Marine Communications and Traffic Services Centres.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Radio Operations Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the operation of radio equipment aboard Canadian Coast Guard ships as defined in the Ships’ Officers Group;
  2. the operation of electronic equipment for the purpose of making and analyzing ionosphere measurements;
  3. the maintenance and repair of electronic and associated electro-mechanical or electrical equipment;
  4. the operation of meteorological communication networks;
  5. the provision of a marine information service within a Regional Marine Information Centre;
  6. the planning, development, conduct or management of telecommunications operations in support of police operations;
  7. the planning, development, conduct or management of lawfully authorized telecommunications interceptions in support of police operations.

Electronics Group Definition

The Electronics Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the application of electronics technology to the design, construction, installation, inspection, maintenance and repair of electronic and associated equipment, systems and facilities and the development and enforcement of regulations and standards governing the use of such equipment.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the inspection, certification and licensing of telecommunications, radio communications and broadcasting equipment installations;
  2. the examination and certification of radio operators and related personnel;
  3. the development and enforcement of international and domestic radio regulations, agreements and equipment standards, and the examination of related applications and technical briefs for radio and television stations;
  4. the detection, investigation and suppression of radio and television interference;
  5. the design, construction, installation, testing, inspection, maintenance, repair or modification of electronic equipment, systems or facilities, including the preparation of related standards;
  6. the conduct of experimental, investigative or research and development projects in the field of electronics, under the leadership of an engineer or a scientist;
  7. the planning and delivery of a quality assurance program for electronic systems and equipment;
  8. the development, direction and conduct of training in the above activities; and
  9. the leadership of any of the above activities.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Electronics Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the operation of electronic equipment for the purpose of monitoring radio aids to navigation;
  2. the use of manual and trade skills in the manufacture, fabrication and assembly of equipment;
  3. the electrical and electronics work performed as part of the repair, modification and refitting of naval vessels and their equipment;
  4. the testing or inspection of electronic equipment to ensure fair measurement;
  5. the planning, development, conduct, or management of telecommunications operations in support of police operations;
  6. the planning, development, conduct or management of lawfully authorized telecommunications interceptions in support of police operations.

Law Management Group Definition

The Law Management Occupational Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the application of a comprehensive knowledge of the law and its practice in the management of legal functions, with accountability for exercising delegated authority over human and financial resources.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for the following activities:

  1. providing legal advice on the development, direction, conduct or management of programs or services; and,
  2. managing legal programs or services and determining the nature and priority of objectives and resources committed to their achievement within and across organizations.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Law Management Occupational Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group.

Law Practitioner Group Definition

The Law Practitioner occupational group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the application of a comprehensive knowledge of the law and its practice to the performance of legal functions.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. The provision of legal advice and legal services;
  2. The drafting of legislation, including regulations and Orders in Council;
  3. The conduct of litigation and prosecution;
  4. The provision of legal policy work and law reform work in the areas of responsibility of the Minister of Justice; and,
  5. The provision of legal research and legal editing services.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Law Practitioner occupational group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group.

Also excluded are positions that require the interpretation of regulations; the drafting of contracts, leases or other legal documents; or the conduct of studies in which a comprehensive knowledge of law is desirable but not mandatory.

[30-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at June 30, 2014

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

5.4

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

9.1

 
   

9.1

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

23,202.2

 

Government of Canada bonds

67,601.7

 

Other investments

346.4

 
   

91,150.3

Property and equipment

 

241.3

Intangible assets

 

47.2

Other assets

 

205.1

 

91,658.4


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

66,926.7

Deposits

Government of Canada

22,354.6

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

149.6

 

Other deposits

1,251.8

 
   

23,756.0

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

537.4

 
   

537.4

   

91,220.1

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

308.3

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

438.3

91,658.4

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, July 16, 2014

S. VOKEY
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, July 16, 2014

STEPEHEN S. POLOZ
Governor

[30-1-o]

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 1
    Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998
  • Footnote b
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote c
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 2
    Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998
  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 4
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society; any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.