ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 41 — October 11, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice with respect to reporting of greenhouse gases (GHGs) for 2014

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 46(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act), that, with respect to emissions of GHGs identified in Schedule 1 to this notice and for the purpose of conducting research, creating an inventory of data, formulating objectives and codes of practice, issuing guidelines, or assessing or reporting on the state of the environment, any person who operates a facility described in Schedule 3 to this notice during the 2014 calendar year, and who possesses or who may reasonably be expected to have access to information described in Schedule 4 to this notice, shall provide the Minister of the Environment with this information no later than June 1, 2015.

Information on GHG emissions requested under this notice shall be submitted to

Minister of the Environment
Pollutant Inventories and Reporting Division
Environment Canada
Fontaine Building, 10th Floor
200 Sacré-Cœur Boulevard
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3

Enquiries concerning this notice shall be addressed to

Pollutant Inventories and Reporting Division
Environment Canada
Fontaine Building, 10th Floor
200 Sacré-Cœur Boulevard
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-938-3258
Toll-free: 1-877-877-8375
Fax: 819-938-3273
Email: ges-ghg@ec.gc.ca

This notice applies to the calendar year 2014. Pursuant to subsection 46(8) of the Act, persons subject to this notice shall keep copies of the required information, together with any calculations, measurements and other data on which the information is based, at the facility to which the calculations, measurements and other data relate, or at the facility’s parent company, located in Canada, for a period of three years from the date the information is required to be submitted. Where the person chooses to keep the information required under the notice, together with any calculations, measurements and other data, at the facility’s parent company in Canada, that person shall inform the Minister of the civic address of that parent company.

If a person who operates a facility with respect to which information was submitted in response to the Notice with respect to reporting of greenhouse gases (GHGs) for 2013 determines that the facility is not required to provide the information set out in Schedule 4 of this notice, the person shall notify the Minister of the Environment that the facility does not meet the criteria set out in Schedule 3 of this notice no later than June 1, 2015.

The Minister of the Environment intends to publish greenhouse gas emission totals by gas for each facility. Pursuant to section 51 of the Act, any person subject to this notice who provides information in response to this notice may submit, with their information and no later than their deadline for submission, a written request that it be treated as confidential based on the reasons set out in section 52 of the Act. The person requesting confidential treatment of the information shall indicate which of the reasons in section 52 of the Act applies to their request. Nevertheless, the Minister may disclose, in accordance with subsection 53(3) of the Act, information submitted in response to this notice. Every person to whom a notice is directed shall comply with the notice. A person who fails to comply with the Act is subject to the offence provision.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

SCHEDULE 1

Greenhouse Gases

Table 1: Greenhouse gases subject to mandatory reporting

  Greenhouse Gas Formula CAS Registry Number (see reference †) 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP)
1. Carbon dioxide CO2 124-38-9 1
2. Methane CH4 74-82-8 25
3. Nitrous oxide N2O 10024-97-2 298
4. Sulphur hexafluoride SF6 2551-62-4 22 800
  Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
5. HFC-23 CHF3 75-46-7 14 800
6. HFC-32 CH2F2 75-10-5 675
7. HFC-41 CH3F 593-53-3 92
8. HFC-43-10mee C5H2F10 138495-42-8 1 640
9. HFC-125 C2HF5 354-33-6 3 500
10. HFC-134 C2H2F4
(Structure: CHF2CHF2)
359-35-3 1 100
11. HFC-134a C2H2F4
(Structure: CH2FCF3)
811-97-2 1 430
12. HFC-143 C2H3F3
(Structure: CHF2CH2F)
430-66-0 353
13. HFC-143a C2H3F3
(Structure: CF3CH3)
420-46-2 4 470
14. HFC-152a C2H4F2
(Structure: CH3CHF2)
75-37-6 124
15. HFC-227ea C3HF7 431-89-0 3 220
16. HFC-236fa C3H2F6 690-39-1 9 810
17. HFC-245ca C3H3F5 679-86-7 693
  Perfluorocarbons (PFCs)
18. Perfluoromethane CF4 75-73-0 7 390
19. Perfluoroethane C2F6 76-16-4 12 200
20. Perfluoropropane C3F8 76-19-7 8 830
21. Perfluorobutane C4F10 355-25-9 8 860
22. Perfluorocyclobutane c-C4F8 115-25-3 10 300
23. Perfluoropentane C5F12 678-26-2 9 160
24. Perfluorohexane C6F14 355-42-0 9 300

Reference †
The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

SCHEDULE 2

Definitions

1. The following definitions apply to this notice and its schedules:

“biomass” means plants or plant materials, animal waste or any product made of either of these. Biomass includes wood and wood products, charcoal, and agricultural residues and wastes (including organic matter such as trees, crops, grasses, tree litter, or roots); that portion of biologically derived organic matter in municipal and industrial wastes; landfill gas; bio-alcohols; black liquor; sludge gas; and animal- or plant-derived oils. (biomasse)

“carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq.)” means a unit of measure used to allow the addition of or the comparison between gases that have different global warming potentials (GWPs). (see footnote 1) [équivalent en dioxyde de carbone (équivalent CO2)]

“CAS Registry Number” means the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number. (see footnote 2) (numéro d’enregistrement CAS)

“CO2 emissions from biomass decomposition” means releases of CO2 resulting from aerobic decomposition of biomass. (émissions de CO2 provenant de la décomposition de la biomasse)

“contiguous facility” means all buildings, equipment, structures and stationary items that are located on a single site or on contiguous or adjacent sites and that are owned or operated by the same person and that function as a single integrated site and includes wastewater collection systems that discharge treated or untreated wastewater into surface waters. (installation contiguë)

“direct emissions” means releases from sources that are located at the facility. (émissions directes)

“facility” means a contiguous facility, a pipeline transportation system, or an offshore installation. (installation)

“flaring emissions” means controlled releases of gases from industrial activities, from the combustion of a gas and or liquid stream produced at the facility not for the purpose of producing energy, including releases from waste petroleum incineration, hazardous emission prevention systems (whether in pilot or active mode), well testing, natural gas gathering system, natural gas processing plant operations, crude oil production, pipeline operations, petroleum refining and chemical fertilizer and steel production. (émissions de torchage)

“fugitive emissions” means uncontrolled releases of gases from industrial activities, other than releases that are venting or flaring emissions, including those releases resulting from the production, processing, transmission, storage and use of solid, liquid or gaseous fuels. (émissions fugitives)

“GHGs” means greenhouse gases. (GES)

“GWP” means global warming potential. (PRP)

“HFCs” means hydrofluorocarbons. (HFC)

“industrial process emissions” means releases from an industrial process that involves chemical or physical reactions other than combustion, and the purpose of which is not to supply energy. (émissions liées aux procédés industriels)

“offshore installation” means an offshore drilling unit, production platform or ship, or sub-sea installation and that is attached or anchored to the continental shelf of Canada in connection with the exploitation of oil or gas. (installation extracôtière)

“on-site transportation emissions” means any direct releases from machinery used for the on-site transportation of substances, materials or products used in the production process. (émissions liées au transport sur le site)

“PFCs” means perfluorocarbons. (PFC)

“pipeline transportation system” means all pipelines that are owned or operated by the same person within a province or territory and that transport processed natural gas and their associated installations including storage installations but excluding straddle plants or other processing installations. (gazoducs)

“reporting company” means a person who operates one or more facilities that meet the reporting threshold as set out in Schedule 3 of this notice. (société déclarante)

“stationary fuel combustion emissions” means releases from non-vehicular combustion sources, in which fuel is burned for the purpose of producing energy. (émissions de combustion stationnaire de combustible)

“venting emissions” means controlled releases to the atmosphere of a waste gas, including releases of casing gas, a gas associated with a liquid (or solution gas), treater, stabilizer or dehydrator off-gas, blanket gas, and releases from pneumatic devices which use natural gas as a driver, and from compressor start-ups, pipelines and other blowdowns, and metering and regulation station control loops. (émissions d’évacuation)

“waste emissions” means releases that result from waste disposal sources at a facility that include landfilling of solid waste, flaring of landfill gas and waste incineration. (émissions des déchets)

“wastewater emissions” means releases that result from wastewater and wastewater treatment at a facility. (émissions des eaux usées)

SCHEDULE 3

Criteria for Reporting

Persons subject to this notice

1. (1) All persons who operate a facility that emits 50 000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (50 kt CO2 eq.) or more (the “reporting threshold”) of the GHGs listed in Table 1 of Schedule 1 in the 2014 calendar year shall be subject to the reporting requirements set out in this notice.

(2) If the person who operates a facility as described in this Schedule changes during the 2014 calendar year, the person who operates the facility, as of December 31, 2014, shall report for the entire 2014 calendar year by June 1, 2015. If operations at a facility are terminated during the 2014 calendar year, the last operator of that facility is required to report for the portion of the 2014 calendar year during which the facility was in operation by June 1, 2015.

2. (1) A person subject to this notice shall determine whether a facility meets or exceeds the reporting threshold described in section 1 using the following equation and the criteria set out in subsections (2) to (4) of this section:

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

where

E = total emissions of a particular gas or gas species from the facility in the calendar year 2014, expressed in tonnes

GWP = global warming potential of the same gas or gas species

i = each emission source

(2) A person subject to this notice shall quantify emissions of each HFC and PFC substance on Schedule 1 separately and then multiply the result for each of these substances by the global warming potential set out in Table 1 of Schedule 1 for that substance.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1), a person subject to this notice shall not include CO2 emissions from combustion of biomass in the determination of total emissions. The person shall quantify and report CO2 emissions from combustion of biomass as part of the greenhouse gas emissions information that is required in paragraph 2(e) of Schedule 4 of this notice.

(4) For the purposes of subsection (1), a person subject to this notice shall not include CO2 emissions from biomass decomposition in the determination of total emissions.

3. A person submitting a report in respect of a facility that meets the emission criteria above shall use the applicable quantification methods for estimating emissions set out in Section E of the Updated UNFCCC [United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change] Reporting Guidelines on Annual Inventories following Incorporation of the Provision of Decision 14/CP.11 contained in FCCC/SBSTA/2006/9.

SCHEDULE 4

Reportable Information

1. A person subject to this notice shall report the following information for each facility that meets the reporting threshold set out in Schedule 3 of this notice:

  • (a) the reporting company’s legal and trade name (if any), and federal business number (assigned by the Canada Revenue Agency) and its Dun and Bradstreet (D-U-N-S) number (if any);
  • (b) the facility name (if any) and the address of its physical location;
  • (c) the latitude and longitude coordinates of the facility, other than a pipeline transportation system;
  • (d) the six-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada code;
  • (e) the National Pollutant Release Inventory identification number (if any);
  • (f) the name, position, mailing and civic address, email address and telephone number of the person submitting the information that is required under this notice;
  • (g) the name, position, mailing address, email address and telephone number of the public contact (if any);
  • (h) the name, position, mailing and civic address, email address and telephone number of the authorized signing officer signing the Statement of Certification pursuant to section 4; and
  • (i) the legal names of the Canadian parent companies (if any), their civic addresses, their percentage of ownership of the reporting company (where available), their federal business number and their Dun and Bradstreet (D-U-N-S) number (if any).

2. For each of the GHGs listed in Table 1 of Schedule 1, a person subject to this notice shall report the following information for each facility that meets the reporting threshold set out in Schedule 3 of this notice:

  • (a) the total quantity in tonnes of direct emissions of carbon dioxide, in each of the following source categories: stationary fuel combustion emissions, industrial process emissions, venting emissions, flaring emissions, fugitive emissions, on-site transportation emissions, waste emissions, and wastewater emissions. The person subject to this notice shall not include CO2 emissions from biomass combustion in the above source categories, but shall report these emissions separately;
  • (b) the total quantity in tonnes of direct emissions of methane and nitrous oxide, in each of the following source categories: stationary fuel combustion emissions, industrial process emissions, venting emissions, flaring emissions, fugitive emissions, on-site transportation emissions, waste emissions, and wastewater emissions. The person subject to this notice shall include CH4 and N2O emissions from biomass combustion in the above source categories;
  • Note: Table 2, below, provides a table for the reporting of these gases.

Table 2: Table for reporting certain GHGs by source category

  Source Categories
Gas Stationary Fuel Combustion Industrial Process Venting Flaring Fugitive On-site Transportation Waste Wastewater
Carbon dioxide (excluding that from biomass combustion, which is to be reported further to paragraph (e))                
Methane                
Nitrous oxide                
Total                
  • (c) in instances where industrial process emissions are produced in combination with emissions from fuel combusted for energy purposes, the person subject to this notice shall report the emissions according to the purpose of the activity: if the purpose of the activity is energy production, the emissions shall be reported as stationary fuel combustion emissions; however, if the purpose of the activity is an industrial process rather than energy production, the emissions shall be reported as industrial process emissions; (see footnote 3)
  • (d) the total quantity in tonnes of direct emissions of sulphur hexafluoride and each hydrofluorocarbon and perfluorocarbon listed on Schedule 1 from industrial processes and industrial product use;
  • (e) the total quantity in tonnes of CO2 from biomass combustion; and
  • (f) the method of estimation used to determine the quantities reported pursuant to paragraphs (a), (b), (d) and (e) chosen from monitoring or direct measurement, mass balance, emission factors, or engineering estimates.

3. CO2 emissions from biomass decomposition are not to be reported.

4. The reported information is to include a Statement of Certification, signed by an authorized signing officer, indicating that the information submitted is true, accurate and complete.

5. If the reported information is subject to a request for confidentiality pursuant to section 51 of the Act, the person subject to this notice shall identify which information is subject to the request and the reasons for the request in accordance with section 52 of the Act.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the notice.)

In March 2004, the Government of Canada initiated a phased approach to the collection of greenhouse gas emissions and related information. This mandatory greenhouse gas reporting program was launched through the publication of the first Canada Gazette notice in March 2004, which set out basic reporting requirements. This notice is the eleventh in a series of notices requiring the reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. This program is part of Canada’s effort to develop, through a collaborative process with provinces and territories, a harmonized and efficient reporting system that will meet the information needs of all levels of government, provide Canadians with reliable and timely information on GHG emissions and support regulatory initiatives.

Reporting requirements on greenhouse gas emissions outlined in this notice are met via Environment Canada’s Single Window (EC SW) system that was launched in March 2010. The EC SW system currently collects data for Environment Canada’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting Program and for British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario, to support provincial GHG reporting regulations; the National Pollutant Release Inventory and its partners and various other partner programs. The EC SW system is currently being considered for GHG reporting by other provinces. The use of a single system for reporting on GHG emissions helps to reduce the reporting burden on industry, and the overall cost to Government. The system requires industry to submit information that is common to multiple jurisdictions once, but also accommodates reporting requirements and thresholds that are jurisdiction specific.

Compliance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (hereinafter referred to as the “Act”) is mandatory pursuant to subsections 272(1) and 272.1(1) of the Act. Amendments to the fine scheme of the Act came into force on June 22, 2012. Subsections 272(2), (3) and (4) and 272.1(2), (3) and (4) of the Act set the penalties for persons who commit an offence under the Act. Offences include failing to comply with an obligation arising from the Act and providing false or misleading information. Penalties for offences can result upon conviction (either summary conviction or indictment) is fines of not more than $12 million, imprisonment for a term of not more than three years, or both.

The current text of the Act, including the most recent amendments, is available on the Department of Justice’s Internet site: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-15.31/.

The Act is enforced in accordance with the Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 available at www.ec.gc.ca/lcpe-cepa/default.asp?lang= En&n=5082BFBE-1. Suspected violations under the Act can be reported to the Enforcement Branch by email at environmental.enforcement@ec.gc.ca.

An electronic copy of this notice is available at the following Internet addresses: www.ec.gc.ca/CEPAregistry/notices or www.ec.gc.ca/ges-ghg.

[41-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2014-66-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 66(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 66(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2014-66-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, September 25, 2014

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2014-66-08-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENT

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 4) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 928-70-1
  • 2720-75-4

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2014-66-08-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

[41-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2014-87-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote d), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote e);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote f), makes the annexed Order 2014-87-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, September 25, 2014

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2014-87-08-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENT

1. Part I of the Non-Domestic Substances List (see footnote 5) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 13897-55-7
  • 13897-56-8
  • 68513-27-9
  • 68554-99-4
  • 70693-26-4
  • 146504-31-6
  • 1163775-81-2

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2014-87-08-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

[41-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of natural gas condensates on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on natural gas condensates pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas three natural gas condensates (natural gas condensates (petroleum) [CAS RN (see footnote 6) 64741-47-5], natural gas (petroleum), raw liquid mix [CAS RN 64741-48-6] and natural gas condensates [CAS RN 68919-39-1]) included in the natural gas condensates draft Screening Assessment are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that all natural gas condensates meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that natural gas condensates be added to Schedule 1 to the Act, and

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for these substances to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

STEVE MCCAULEY
Director General
Energy and Transportation Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Natural Gas Condensates

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of natural gas condensates (NGCs), a class of substances that share similarities in source, properties, and use. In this draft Screening Assessment, NGCs are defined as complex combinations of hydrocarbons in a liquid form, primarily separated and/or condensed from natural gas, and consisting of hydrocarbons mostly falling within, but not necessarily spanning, a carbon range of C2 to C30. In addition, they include all liquids derived from natural gas distillates, except those with predominant hydrocarbon fractions below C5. NGCs are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs). NGCs were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are all complex combinations of hydrocarbons.

During the categorization of the Domestic Substances List, the three NGCs bearing Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) 64741-47-5, 64741-48-6 and 68919-39-1, respectively, were identified as high priorities for action as they were determined to present the “greatest potential” or “intermediate potential” for exposure of individuals in Canada and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. The NGC identified by CAS RN 64741-47-5 also met the ecological categorization criteria. The conclusions of this assessment are considered to cover NGCs as described herein, including the three high priority NGCs.

NGCs spills data reported to Environment Canada and to Alberta’s Energy Resources and Conservation Board were analyzed for the years 2002–2011. NGCs spills data from Alberta were used for the analyses of spill frequency and magnitude, except for spills to marine waters, in which case the Environment Canada data were used. The risk analysis conducted with these data indicates that NGCs may cause harm to soil organisms given the frequency and volume of spills to land (approximately 50 spills per year with a median volume of 500 L). In addition, there are on average 2 spills/year of NGCs to muskeg/stagnant water that may cause harm to aquatic organisms. There was a low frequency of spills to flowing fresh water (less than 1/year) reported; therefore, a risk analysis for flowing fresh water was not performed. There was on average 1 spill per year to marine waters, with average and median spill sizes of approximately 75 L and 2 L, respectively. Given the small size of most spills to marine water, and the low frequency of spills, releases of NGCs have a low likelihood of causing harm to marine species.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment on the frequency and magnitude of spills, NGCs may cause harm to organisms in areas adjacent to sources of release; however, these releases do not compromise the broader integrity of the environment. It is therefore proposed to conclude that NGCs meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA 1999 as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that NGCs do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Exposure and hazard information on the three high-priority NGCs, as well as information on NGCs in general, was used for the human health portion of this assessment.

Due to the absence of relevant toxicological studies on NGCs, health effects information on benzene and low boiling point naphthas (LBPNs) [that are similar to NGCs from a physical–chemical perspective] was considered. Benzene, a component of NGCs, has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen, and was added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. Based on an analysis of the major hydrocarbon constituents of NGCs, benzene was selected as a high-hazard component to characterize potential exposure and risk to the general population from evaporative emissions of NGCs.

The potential for general population exposure to NGCs was evaluated by considering data on the handling/transportation of the substances bearing CAS RNs 64741-47-5, 64741-48-6 and 68919-39-1 and on evaporative emissions from bulk NGC storage facilities. For non-cancer endpoints, margins of exposure (MOEs) for short-term inhalation exposure to evaporative emissions of NGCs in the vicinity of rail loading/unloading sites are considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. For cancer endpoints, MOEs based on upper-bounding estimates of long-term inhalation exposure to evaporative emissions of NGCs in the vicinity of high-volume rail or truck loading/unloading sites, as well as in the vicinity of NGC storage facilities, are considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure.

Based on the information presented in this Screening Assessment, it is proposed to conclude that NGCs meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is therefore proposed to conclude that NGCs meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the risk management scope document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[41-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two liquefied petroleum gases — Petroleum gases, liquefied, CAS (see footnote 7) RN 68476-85-7, and Petroleum gases, liquefied, sweetened, CAS RN 68476-86-8 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Petroleum gases, liquefied and Petroleum gases, liquefied, sweetened are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on these liquefied petroleum gases, a subset of petroleum and refinery gases, pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these liquefied petroleum gases meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that these liquefied petroleum gases be added to Schedule 1 to the Act, and

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for these liquefied petroleum gases to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

STEVE MCCAULEY
Director General
Energy and Transportation Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Two Liquefied Petroleum Gases (Stream 4 Petroleum and Refinery Gases)

The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following liquefied petroleum gases (LPGs):

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name
68476-85-7 68476-86-8 Petroleum gases, liquefied Petroleum gases, liquefied, sweetened

These substances were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they were determined to present the greatest potential or intermediate potential for exposure of individuals in Canada and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. These substances met the categorization criteria for persistence but did not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation or inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are complex combinations of hydrocarbons.

LPGs are produced at petroleum facilities (i.e. refineries or natural gas processing facilities) and are a category of light, predominantly saturated, hydrocarbons (C3–C4). LPGs from refineries may contain unsaturated hydrocarbons, such as propene and butenes. LPGs are similar in composition to site-restricted (PSSA Stream 1) and industry-restricted (PSSA Stream 2) petroleum and refinery gases. Petroleum and refinery gases, including LPGs, are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs). The composition of LPGs varies depending on the sources (e.g. natural gas, crude oil), as well as process operating conditions and processing units used. In order to predict the overall behaviour of these complex substances for the purposes of assessing the potential for ecological effects, representative structures have been selected from each chemical class in the substances.

LPGs are used primarily as domestic and industrial fuels, as feedstocks, and as aerosol propellants in products available to consumers. It has been recognized that, given the physical and chemical properties of these substances (i.e. gases with high vapour pressures), releases of LPGs into the atmosphere can occur.

Based on the available information, exposure to LPGs is considered to be mainly through inhalation. Considering the low acute toxicity of the components of LPGs to small mammals via inhalation, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from LPGs. It is proposed to conclude that these two LPGs (CAS RNs 68476-85-7 and 68476-86-8) do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) and (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical human health effect for the initial categorization of these two LPGs was carcinogenicity, as the European Union has identified petroleum and refinery gases containing 1,3-butadiene at concentrations equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight as carcinogens. 1,3-Butadiene has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen and was added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. 1,3-Butadiene was found to be a multi-site carcinogen in rodents, increasing the incidence of tumours at all inhalation concentrations tested. 1,3-Butadiene also exhibits genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and a plausible mode of action for induction of tumours involves direct interaction with genetic material.

Based on available information, 1,3-butadiene is considered to be present in these two LPGs. Therefore, consistent with the approach used to assess the site-restricted (Stream 1) and industry-restricted (Stream 2) petroleum and refinery gases, 1,3-butadiene was selected as a high-hazard component to characterize the potential exposure to the general population. It is recognized that emissions of these two LPGs at petroleum facilities will contribute to a portion of the previously estimated releases of Stream 1 petroleum and refinery gases. In that assessment, it was determined that margins between high-end estimates of exposure to 1,3-butadiene and estimates of cancer potency for inhalation exposure to 1,3-butadiene are considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure.

The general population living in the vicinity of LPG cylinder tank filling stations or LPG vehicle refuelling stations may also be exposed to LPGs. Margins of exposure were therefore derived based on potential long-term inhalation exposure to 1,3-butadiene arising from LPG releases during the fuel transfer process and are considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure.

The general population may also be exposed to LPGs through various aerosol products available in the Canadian marketplace that use LPGs as propellants. For the characterization of risk of potential long-term inhalation exposure to aerosol products containing LPGs, a margin of exposure was derived based on 1,3-butadiene indoor air levels in non-smoking homes located in three Canadian cities. Compared with the cancer potency of 1,3-butadiene, the margin of exposure is considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. This approach is considered conservative, as multiple sources likely contribute to indoor air levels of 1,3-butadiene.

Based on the contribution of these two LPGs to overall petroleum facility emissions, it is proposed to conclude that these two LPGs (CAS RNs 68476-85-7 and 68476-86-8) meet the criteria in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that these two LPGs (CAS RNs 6847685-7 and 68476-86-8) meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the risk management scope document for these substances are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of five diarylide yellow pigments specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas three of the five diarylide yellow pigments identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas one of the substances, the substance bearing CAS RN (see footnote 8) 78952-70-2, is currently subject to the significant new activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on the five substances, pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act for CAS RN 5567-15-7 (Pigment Yellow 83) and CAS RN 90268-24-9 (Pigment Yellow 176) and pursuant to section 74 of the Act for CAS RN 6358-85-6 (Pigment Yellow 12), CAS RN 5102-83-0 (Pigment Yellow 13), and CAS RN 78952-70-2 (CPAOBP), is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the five substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on Pigment Yellow 83 and Pigment Yellow 176 at this time,

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on Pigment Yellow 12, Pigment Yellow 13, and CPAOBP at this time under section 77 of the Act, and

Notice is further given that, pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Act, the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List such that CPAOBP is no longer subject to the significant new activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment of Five Diarylide Yellow Pigments

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on five structurally related diarylide yellow pigments. These substances constitute a subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan based on structural similarity and applications. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN), Domestic Substances List (DSL) name, Colour Index (C.I.) generic name, and chemical acronym of the five substances are presented in the following table.

Identity of five diarylide yellow pigments in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN DSL name C.I. generic name Chemical acronym
5102-83-0 Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxo- Pigment Yellow 13 PY13
5567-15-7 (see reference a) Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[N-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-oxo- Pigment Yellow 83 PY83
6358-85-6 Butanamide, 2,2′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[3-oxo-N-phenyl- Pigment Yellow 12 PY12
78952-70-2 Butanamide, 2-[[3,3′-dichloro-4′-[[1-[[(2-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-oxopropyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxo- N/A CPAOBP
90268-24-9 (see reference b) Pigment Yellow 176 Pigment Yellow 176 PY176

Abbreviation: N/A, not available.

Reference a
These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered priorities based on other human health concerns.

Reference b
These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered priorities based on other human health concerns.

These five diarylide yellow pigments do not occur naturally in the environment. Four of the five substances have been reported as manufactured in Canada and/or imported for use in industrial activities. Some of the substances are also present in consumer products and cosmetics. No data on measured concentrations in the Canadian environment (or in other countries) have been identified for any of these substances.

Environment

Diarylide yellow pigments exist principally as particles in the nanometre or low micrometre size range, and the pigment powder is typically composed of primary particles (i.e. the crystal lattice of a pigment), aggregates and agglomerates. These pigments have very low solubility in both water (generally in the low micrograms per litre range) and in octanol (below 1 mg/L); because of this, it was proposed that a quotient of the molar solute concentrations in octanol and in water (Soct/Sw) would reasonably represent the octanol–water partition coefficients (Kow) for these pigments. The physical and chemical properties and the particulate nature of these substances suggest that soil and sediments would be the two major environmental media to which diarylide yellow pigments partition.

Experimental data indicate that under aerobic conditions, diarylide yellow pigments are expected to degrade slowly in water, soil and sediments.

Diarylide yellow pigments are not expected to bioaccumulate given their physical and chemical properties (i.e. based on the particulate character of these substances, their very low solubility in both water and octanol, and the high weight and large size of molecules of these substances).

Due to the limited bioavailability of diarylide yellow pigments, no effects were found at the concentration of 1 000 mg/kg soil or sediment (dry weight) in chronic soil and sediment toxicity studies. These pigments also showed no effect at saturation in acute and chronic aquatic ecotoxicity studies in which solvents were not used. Based on these studies, diarylide yellow pigments are not expected to be harmful to aquatic, soil-dwelling or sediment-dwelling organisms at low concentrations.

To evaluate potential exposures to diarylide yellow pigments in the environment, predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) were estimated. An industrial release scenario was chosen to evaluate the potential exposure to these substances. Predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) values for each relevant environmental compartment (soil, sediment and water) were calculated based on the experimental critical toxicity values. Calculated risk quotient (PEC/PNEC) values were much lower than 1 for each environmental compartment (soil, sediment and water), indicating that harm to organisms in these media is not expected.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the diarylide yellow pigments evaluated in this assessment. It is concluded that these diarylide yellow pigments do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

For the human health assessment, exposure of the general population of Canada to these diarylide yellow pigments from environmental media is not expected to be significant, while potential exposure by dermal, oral, and inhalation routes may occur from the use of these substances in consumer products and cosmetics. These substances are expected to exhibit low to negligible absorption and low toxicity. The margins between the estimates of exposure from the use of consumer products and cosmetics and conservative effect levels are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases.

Based on the information presented in this Screening Assessment, it is concluded that the diarylide yellow pigments evaluated in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that the five diarylide yellow pigments evaluated in this assessment do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The current Screening Assessment concludes that CPAOBP does not meet the categorization criteria for bioaccumulation or inherent toxicity as was previously determined in the final Screening Assessment of 145 substances that are persistent, bioaccumulative and inherently toxic (including CPAOBP) published in April 2008. Consequently, Environment Canada, in collaboration with Health Canada, intends to amend the Domestic Substances List, pursuant to subsection 87(3) of CEPA 1999, to indicate that CPAOBP is no longer subject to the significant new activities provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act.

The Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[41-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

TOBACCO ACT

Notice of proposed order to amend the schedule to the Tobacco Act

This notice offers interested parties the opportunity to provide comments on proposed amendments to the schedule of prohibited additives found in the Tobacco Act. These amendments would further restrict the use of additives, including flavouring additives that are used to market cigars that appeal to youth.

Background

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and disease in Canada; it is responsible for more than 37 000 deaths each year. Direct health care costs are estimated at $4.4 billion annually, and the total burden to the economy, including indirect costs (e.g. lost wages, productivity), is estimated at $17 billion per year.

Among Canadians who have ever smoked a whole cigarette, 90% did so by the age of 20 and, of those, more than three quarters went on to become regular smokers at some point in their lifetime. Preventing youth from smoking will contribute to lower prevalence rates over time, including among young adults (ages 20 to 24), who have the highest rate of smoking in Canada.

In 2008, Prime Minister Harper committed to cracking down on the marketing of flavoured tobacco products, like cigarillos, aimed at youth. Prior to 2008, flavoured little cigars (cigars similar in size and in other characteristics to cigarettes) were becoming increasingly popular with youth. In order to limit the tobacco industry’s marketing of such products to youth, the Government of Canada introduced the Cracking Down on Tobacco Marketing Aimed at Youth Act in 2009. Its coming into force amended the Tobacco Act to block tobacco marketing aimed at youth. The legislation ended the sale of single little cigars and blunt wraps to make them less affordable to youth. In addition, the Act banned flavours that were enticing to young people through a schedule which sets out the additives, including flavouring additives other than menthol, prohibited from use in relation to the manufacture and sale of cigarettes, little cigars and blunt wraps. The schedule can be viewed at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/T-11.5/page-16.html#h-22.

With the coming into force of the amendments in 2010, Canada became the first country in the world to prevent the use of additives that contributed to making tobacco products more appealing to youth.

The Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) shows that the use of flavoured tobacco products by youth has decreased since the Government passed the Cracking Down on Tobacco Marketing Aimed at Youth Act. According to the 2012 CTUMS, 5% of youth aged 15 to 19 reported using little cigars in the last 30 days compared to 8% in 2009. Unit sales of flavoured cigars fell an estimated 35% between 2009 and 2011. Finally, according to the Youth Smoking Survey, the prevalence of youth in grades 6 to 12 who reported using at least one flavoured tobacco product in their lifetime has decreased from 19% in 2008–2009 to 15% in 2012–2013. When the legislation came into force in 2010, the Prime Minister publicly stated that the Government would monitor compliance.

Since 2010, Health Canada has observed the introduction of resized cigars (weighing over 1.4 g and without a filter) in the same flavours as those that were on the market before the 2009 amendments to the Tobacco Act. Typically, these resized cigars will feature tipping paper (a paper commonly used to cover filters) even though they are made without filters and/or will have a wrapper that is not fitted in spiral form.

Despite the smoking rate among youth being at an all-time low, young persons continue to use flavoured tobacco products. According to the 2012–2013 Youth Smoking Survey (grades 6 to 12; from grade 6 to secondary V in Quebec), among youth reporting having used at least one tobacco product in the last 30 days, two in five (40%) reported using a flavoured little cigar or a flavoured cigar during the same period, representing approximately 126 000 young Canadians.

Proposed amendments

The schedule to the Tobacco Act lists certain additives, including most flavouring additives other than menthol, that are prohibited from use in the manufacture of cigarettes, little cigars and blunt wraps. Health Canada is proposing to amend the schedule to prohibit the use of the same additives (with some exceptions) in other types of cigars, on the basis that the additives are used to market cigars that appeal to youth. The exceptions would be made to limit the impact on the choices of adults.

The amendments under consideration are as follows:

  • The current prohibitions on the use of certain additives in relation to the manufacture and sale of little cigars would be extended to cigars with tipping paper and cigars with a wrapper that is not fitted in spiral form. The prohibitions would also apply to cigars weighing more than 1.4 g but less than 6 g, excluding the weight of any mouthpiece or tip.
  • Certain traditional flavours that appeal to adults would be allowed in cigars weighing between 1.4 and 6 g, provided they do not feature a filter, tipping paper or a wrapper that is not fitted in spiral form. The use of additives that impart an aroma generally attributed to port, wine, rum or whisky would be allowed in these cigars.
  • Regardless of the type of cigar, menthol would remain exempt from the prohibition on flavouring additives, as is currently the case.
Submitting comments

The publication of this notice begins a 30-day comment period. There will be further opportunities to provide comments throughout the federal regulatory process. Comments received in response to this notice will be used to inform Health Canada’s policy and to enhance the proposed amendments.

Stakeholders and interested parties are requested to provide their comments to the Manager, Regulations Division, Tobacco Products Regulatory Office, Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe) to pregs@hc-sc.gc.ca or by mail at Address Locator 0301A, Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

SUZY MCDONALD
Associate Director General
Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Montréal Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Montréal Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective March 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal immovables managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS Schedule B.1 of the letters patent specifies the dates on which certain federal immovables are to be withdrawn from Part I of Schedule B of the letters patent;

WHEREAS consistent with Schedule B.1,the federal immovables corresponding to items 14 and 15 at Schedule B.1 were withdrawn from Part I of Schedule B on July 1, 2013;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to give management to the Authority of the federal immovables corresponding to items 14 and 15 at Schedule B.1 until July 1, 2017;

WHEREAS pursuant to Schedule B.1, the federal immovables corresponding to items 4, 5, 6 and 9 at Schedule B.1 are to be withdrawn from Part 1 of Schedule B on July 1, 2014;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has also requested that the Minister postpone the date at which the federal immovables corresponding to items 4, 5, 6 and 9 at Schedule B.1 are to be withdrawn from Part 1 of Schedule B until July 1, 2017;

WHEREAS the federal immovables corresponding to items 4, 5, 6, 9, 14 and 15 at Schedule B.1 have been subject to a cadastral amendment and therefore the descriptions of these immovables at Schedule B.1 need to be revised;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, under the authority of section 9 of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Item numbers 4, 5, and 6 of Schedule B.1 of the letters patent are replaced by the following:

No. Summary designation/ Cadastre number + Total area shown on plan
Cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Montreal
Parcel number(s) shown on plan Lease No. Column A
Date of withdrawal
Column B
Date of withdrawal if lease extended
4 (770 Mill Street)
An immovable designated as being lot number 4 657 460, having an area of 4 755.2 m2 (formerly known as being composed of parts of lots number 1 853 761 and number 1 853 785 (borough of Ville-Marie, Montreal)).
4 B2213 July 1, 2017 -
5 (Mill Street - Parking Lot) An immovable designated as being lot number 4 657 459, having an area of 2 238.5 m2 (formerly known as being composed of parts of lots number 1 853 761 and number 1 853 785 (borough of Ville-Marie, Montreal)). 5 B2408-2 July 1, 2017 -
6 (805, Mill Street )
An immovable, having a total area of 2 928.0 m2, designated as lot number 1 853 758 (borough of Ville-Marie, Montreal).
6 B2240 July 1, 2017 -

2. Item number 9 of Schedule B.1 of the letters patent is replaced by the following:

No. Summary designation/ Cadastre number + Total area shown on plan Cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Montreal Parcel number(s) shown on plan Lease No. Column A Date of withdrawal Column B Date of withdrawal if lease extended
9 (Rozon Parking Lot) An immovable designated as being lot number 4 657 454, having an area of 7 173.5 m2 (formerly known as being part of lot number 1 854 009 (borough of Ville-Marie, Montreal)). 9 B2432 July 1, 2017 -

3. Item numbers 14 and 15 of Schedule B.1 of the letters patent are replaced by the following:

No. Summary designation/ Cadastre number + Total area shown on plan Cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Montreal Parcel number(s) shown on plan Lease No. Column A Date of withdrawal Column B Date of withdrawal if lease extended
14 (960 des Moulins Road) An immovable designated as being lot number 4 657 472, having an area of 18 479.5 m2 (formerly known as being part of lots number 2 160 126 and number 2 974 606 (South-West borough, Montreal)). 14 B2480 July 1, 2017 -
15 (Parking Lot P10 – 1261 des Irlandais Road) An immovable designated as being lot number 4 657 475, having an area of 23 916.3 m2 (formerly known as being composed of lot number 2 160 128 and of parts of lots number 1 853 776, number 2 160 126, number 2 160 249, number 2 296 281 and number 2 974 606 (South-West borough, Montreal)). 15 B2067-2 July 1, 2017 -

4. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of issuance.

ISSUED under my hand this 26th day of June, 2014.

________________________________

The Honourable Lisa Raitt, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Tempus, Inc. — Approval to have a financial establishment in Canada

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to section 522.26 of the Bank Act, that the Minister of Finance, pursuant to subsection 522.211(1) of the Bank Act, approved on August 10, 2014, Tempus, Inc. to have a financial establishment in Canada.

September 30, 2014

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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  • Footnote 1
    Since many greenhouse gases (GHGs) exist and their GWPs vary, the emissions are added in a common unit, CO2 equivalent. To express GHG emissions in units of CO2 equivalent, the quantity of a given GHG (expressed in units of mass) is multiplied by its GWP.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 3
    This distinction is in accordance with that provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Source: IPCC 2006, 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme, Eggleston, H. S., L. Buendia, K. Miwa, T. Ngara and K. Tanabe (eds). Published: IGES, Japan, Volumes 2 and 3.
  • Footnote a
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote b
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote c
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 4
    Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote e
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote f
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 5
    Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998
  • Footnote 6
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 7
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 8
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.