ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 48 — November 29, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Establishing the Caring for Children Class

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 14.1 (see footnote a) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote b), gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Establishing the Caring for Children Class.

Ottawa, November 24, 2014

CHRIS ALEXANDER
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

MINISTERIAL INSTRUCTIONS ESTABLISHING THE CARING FOR CHILDREN CLASS

Definitions

1. (1) The following definitions apply in these Instructions.

“Act”
« Loi »

“Act” means the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

“Canadian educational credential”
« Diplôme canadien »

“Canadian educational credential” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“equivalency assessment”
« attestation d’équivalence »

“equivalency assessment” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“full-time work”
« travail à plein temps »

“full-time work” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“language skill area”
« habileté langagière »

“language skill area” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“Regulations”
« Règlement »

“Regulations” means the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

“work”
« travail »

“work” means an activity for which wages are paid or commission is earned.

Economic class

(2) For greater certainty, the caring for children class is part of the economic class referred to in paragraph 70(2)(b) of the Regulations.

Caring for children class

2. (1) The caring for children class is established as part of the economic class referred to in subsection 12(2) of the Act whose members are foreign nationals who intend to reside in a province other than Quebec and who, as of the date on which their application for a permanent resident visa as a member of that class is made,

  • (a) have acquired — within the four years before that date — at least two years of full-time work experience in Canada as a home child care provider within the meaning of that occupation as set out in the National Occupational Classification for unit group 4411, other than any experience as a foster parent;
  • (b) meet the employment requirements that are listed as required, if any, in the National Occupational Classification under unit group 4411;
  • (c) have attained a level of proficiency of at least benchmark 5 in either official language for each of the four language skill areas, as set out in the Canadian Language Benchmarks or the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens, as demonstrated by the results of an evaluation designated by the Minister — that must be less than two years old on that date — by an organization or institution designated by the Minister for the purpose of evaluating language proficiency under subsection 74(3) of the Regulations; and
  • (d) have obtained
    • (i) a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies, or
    • (ii) a foreign diploma, certificate or credential, along with an equivalency assessment — issued within five years before that date — that indicates that the foreign diploma, certificate or credential is equivalent to a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies.

Full-time work experience in Canada

(2) The full-time work experience in Canada referred to in paragraph (1)(a)

  • (a) must include the performance of the actions described in the lead statement for the occupation of home child care provider set out for unit group 4411 in the National Occupational Classification and the performance of a substantial number of the main duties listed for that unit group, including all of the essential duties;
  • (b) must only involve work that was authorized under a work permit;
  • (c) must be acquired while the foreign national had temporary resident status; and
  • (d) must not include any period during which the foreign national was engaged in full-time study or was self-employed.

Processing fees

3. The following fees are payable for processing an application for a permanent resident visa as a member of the caring for children class:

  • (a) in respect of a principal applicant, $550;
  • (b) in respect of a spouse or common-law partner of the principal applicant, $550; and
  • (c) in respect of a dependent child of the principal applicant, $150.

Family member — permanent resident status

4. A foreign national who is an accompanying family member of a person who makes an application as member of the caring for children class becomes a permanent resident if, following an examination, it is established that

  • (a) the person who made the application has become a permanent resident; and
  • (b) the foreign national is not inadmissible.

Effective period

5. These Instructions have effect during the period that begins on November 30, 2014 and that ends on November 29, 2019.

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Establishing the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Class

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 14.1 (see footnote c) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote d), gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Establishing the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Class.

Ottawa, November 24, 2014

CHRIS ALEXANDER
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

MINISTERIAL INSTRUCTIONS ESTABLISHING THE CARING FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH MEDICAL NEEDS CLASS

Definitions

1. (1) The following definitions apply in these Instructions.

“Act”
« Loi »

“Act” means the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

“Canadian educational credential”
« Diplôme canadien »

“Canadian educational credential” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“equivalency assessment”
« attestation d’équivalence »

“equivalency assessment” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“full-time work”
« travail à plein temps »

“full-time work” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“language skill area”
« habileté langagière »

“language skill area” has the same meaning as in subsection 73(1) of the Regulations.

“Regulations”
« Règlement »

“Regulations” means the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

“work”
« travail »

“work” means an activity for which wages are paid or commission is earned.

Economic class

(2) For greater certainty, the caring for people with high medical needs class is part of the economic class referred to in paragraph 70(2)(b) of the Regulations.

Caring for people with high medical needs class

2. (1) The caring for people with high medical needs class is established as part of the economic class referred to in subsection 12(2) of the Act whose members are foreign nationals who intend to reside in a province other than Quebec and who, as of the date on which their application for a permanent resident visa as a member of that class is made,

  • (a) have acquired — within the four years before that date — at least two years of full-time work experience in Canada in one of the following occupations:
    • (i) a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse within the meaning of the National Occupational Classification for unit group 3012, including the occupations listed under that unit group as example titles.
    • (ii) a licensed practical nurse within the meaning of the National Occupational Classification for unit group 3233, including the occupations listed under that unit group as example titles,
    • (iii) a nurse aide, orderly or patient service associate within the meaning of that occupation as set out in the National Occupational Classification for unit group 3413, including the occupations listed under that unit group as example titles, or
    • (iv) a home support worker or related occupation, but not a housekeeper, within the meaning of that occupation as set out in the National Occupational Classification for unit group 4412, including the occupations — other than housekeeper — listed under that unit group as example titles;
  • (b) meet the employment requirements that are listed as required, if any, for the occupation in question in the National Occupational Classification under the applicable unit group for that occupation, including any applicable requirements of registration with the appropriate regulatory body in the province where the foreign national intends to reside;
  • (c) have attained at least the following level of proficiency in either official language for each of the four language skill areas, as set out in the Canadian Language Benchmarks or the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens, as demonstrated by the results of an evaluation designated by the Minister — that must be less than two years old on that date — by an organization or institution designated by the Minister for the purpose of evaluating language proficiency under subsection 74(3) of the Regulations:
    • (i) for an occupation referred to in subparagraph (a)(i), benchmark 7, and
    • (ii) for an occupation referred to in any of subparagraphs (a)(ii) to (iv), benchmark 5; and
  • (d) have obtained
    • (i) a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies, or
    • (ii) a foreign diploma, certificate or credential, along with an equivalency assessment — issued within five years before that date — that indicates that the foreign diploma, certificate or credential is equivalent to a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies.

Work experience in Canada

(2) The full-time work experience in Canada referred to in paragraph (1)(a)

  • (a) must include the performance of the actions described in the lead statement for the occupation in question set out in the unit group for that occupation in the National Occupational Classification and the performance of a substantial number of the main duties listed for that unit group, including all of the essential duties,
  • (b) must only involve work that was authorized under a work permit;
  • (c) must be acquired while the foreign national had temporary resident status; and
  • (d) must not include any period during which the foreign national was engaged in full-time study or was self-employed.

Processing fees

3. The following fees are payable for processing an application for a permanent resident visa as a member of the caring for people with high medical needs class:

  • (a) in respect of a principal applicant, $550;
  • (b) in respect of a spouse or common-law partner of the principal applicant, $550; and
  • (c) in respect of a dependent child of the principal applicant, $150.

Family member — permanent resident status

4. A foreign national who is an accompanying family member of a person who makes an application as member of the caring for people with high medical needs class becomes a permanent resident if, following an examination, it is established that

  • (a) the person who made the application has become a permanent resident; and
  • (b) the foreign national is not inadmissible.

Effective period

5. These Instructions have effect during the period that begins on November 30, 2014 and that ends on November 29, 2019.

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

New Ministerial Instructions

Notice is hereby given, under subsection 87.3(6) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, that the Department of Citizenship and Immigration has established the following Ministerial Instructions that, in the opinion of the Minister, will best support the attainment of the immigration goals established by the Government of Canada.

Overview

Authority for Ministerial Instructions is derived from section 87.3 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). The Instructions are directed to officers who are charged with handling and/or reviewing applications for permanent residence under the Live-in Caregiver Class in Canada.

These Instructions come into force on November 30, 2014.

These Instructions apply to applications received by the designated Citizenship and Immigration Canada offices after November 30, 2014.

Any categories for which Instructions are not specifically issued shall continue to be processed in the usual manner.

These Instructions are intended to support a broader strategy for caregiver immigration reform and are part of important changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. These reforms include creating new pathways to permanent residence (PR) and reducing the vulnerability of caregivers. The new PR pathways aim to ensure that caregivers have the opportunity to continue their career objectives or to transition into established, well-paying careers and integrate into Canada’s labour market successfully.

These Instructions are consistent with IRPA objectives as laid out in section 3, specifically to pursue the maximum social, cultural and economic benefits of immigration; to enrich and strengthen the social and cultural fabric of Canadian society; to support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy; and to protect public health and safety and to maintain the security of Canadian society.

The Instructions are compliant with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The Instructions respect all previously established accords and agreements including the Quebec-Canada Accord and all agreements with provinces and territories.

Intake of permanent resident applications under the Live-in Caregiver Class

No new permanent resident application under the Live-in Caregiver Class [section 113 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR)] will be accepted for processing unless it is supported, at the time of application receipt by CIC, by evidence that the underlying work permit associated with the foreign national’s initial entry as a live-in caregiver under the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) was based on a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) that was requested from Service Canada on or before November 30, 2014.

This will remain in place unless otherwise indicated in a future Ministerial Instruction.

No humanitarian and compassionate requests to overcome requirements of Ministerial Instructions

Requests made on the basis of humanitarian and compassionate grounds from outside Canada that accompany any permanent resident application affected by Ministerial Instructions but not identified for processing under the Instructions will not be processed.

Retention and disposition

Applicants for permanent residence under the Live-in Caregiver Class whose application is received after November 30, 2014, and which does not, at the time of application receipt by CIC, contain evidence that the underlying work permit associated with the foreign national’s initial entry as a live-in caregiver under the LCP was based on an LMIA that was requested from Service Canada on or before November 30, 2014, shall be informed that their application does not qualify for processing and their processing fees shall be returned.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 11 living organisms — Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0, (see footnote 1) Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7, Bacillus licheniformis ATCC (see footnote 2) 12713, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405, Bacillus subtilis subspecies subtilis ATCC 6051, Bacillus subtilis subspecies inaquosorum ATCC 55406, Bacillus species 16970-5, Bacillus species 2 18118-1, Bacillus species 4 18121-4 and Bacillus species 7 18129-3 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0, Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7, Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 12713, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405, Bacillus subtilis subspecies subtilis ATCC 6051, Bacillus subtilis subspecies inaquosorum ATCC 55406, Bacillus species 16970-5, Bacillus species 2 18118-1, Bacillus species 4 18121-4 and Bacillus species 7 18129-3 are living organisms on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on these living organisms, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that these living organisms do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these living organisms at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of 11 Strains in the Domestic Substances List Bacillus licheniformis/subtilis Group

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a Screening Assessment of the following living organism strains that are listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL):

  • Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0
  • Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7
  • Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 12713
  • Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A (also referred to as Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a)
  • Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405
  • Bacillus subtilis subspecies subtilis ATCC 6051T (= type strain)
  • Bacillus subtilis subspecies inaquosorum ATCC 55406
  • Bacillus species 16970-5
  • Bacillus species 2 18118-1
  • Bacillus species 4 18121-4
  • Bacillus species 7 18129-3

For the purposes of this assessment, the DSL living organisms listed above will collectively be referred to as the “DSL Bacillus licheniformis/subtilis group.” The term “Bacillus subtilis complex” will denote information that is not specific to these DSL strains, but relates to the broader group of species that includes the DSL strains.

The living organisms in the B. licheniformis/subtilis group on the DSL were added to the DSL under subsection 105(1) of CEPA 1999, because they were manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, and they entered or were released into the environment without being subject to conditions under CEPA 1999 or any other federal or provincial legislation. Each of the four strains listed at the bottom of the above list are “masked” to the genus level at the request of the Nominator, pursuant to the Masked Name Regulations of CEPA 1999, and the full species name may not be disclosed.

Members of the broader B. subtilis complex have the ability to adapt to and thrive in many terrestrial and aquatic habitats. They may be contaminants in food and transient members of the bowel microflora. Some members of the B. subtilis complex are used in the fermentation of foods. They form endospores that permit survival in suboptimal environmental conditions. Numerous physiological variants exist in nature, indicating that members of this complex establish successfully in nearly every environment. Various characteristics of the DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group make them suitable for use as active ingredients in commercial and consumer products.

Certain strains of B. licheniformis can cause bovine, porcine and ovine abortion as well as mastitis in cattle, but the overall impact of B. licheniformis disease in livestock is low. Members of the DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group are susceptible to veterinary antibiotics so that in the case of livestock infection, effective treatment options are available. Negative effects in aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates exposed to strains of B. subtilis and B. licheniformis have been reported. One report implicated an isolate of B. licheniformis as the causative agent of pistachio dieback. B. subtilis complex strains also have antimicrobial properties and can promote growth in both plants and animals.

Certain members of the B. subtilis complex are occasionally reported to cause disease in susceptible humans, including those with debilitating disease or compromised immunity, young infants and the elderly, but do so rarely in the general population. Some produce extracellular enzymes and toxins that could cause food poisoning. In laboratory analyses done by scientists at Health Canada, the DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis strains did not produce these food poisoning toxins.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of these strains with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA 1999, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. These strains were nominated for inclusion on the DSL based on uses in consumer and commercial products for cleaning and deodorizing, drain cleaning and degreasing, treatment of recreational vehicle septic tanks and in bioremediation and biodegradation, waste and wastewater treatment, water conditioning and livestock feed. Additional potential uses identified in the public domain include use in the formation of beneficial biofilms for medical and cleaning applications, as bioindicators of sediment toxicity, in dispersal modelling and sterility testing, in metal biosynthesis, as antifungal biocontrol agents, as active ingredients in human and veterinary probiotic products, and in the production of antibiotics and enzymes for numerous applications, including cleaning and breaking down complex cellulosic materials for ethanol production. B. atrophaeus is mostly used as a surrogate organism in dispersal modelling, to fine tune defense monitoring equipment and to test the efficacy of sterilization procedures.

To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA 1999, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009. Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that in the 2008 reporting year, products containing the strains listed in the DSL were imported into or manufactured in Canada in quantities up to 100 tonnes for B. amyloliquefaciens, 1 000 tonnes for B. licheniformis and 1 000 tonnes for B. subtilis. No information on uses of B. atrophaeus was collected through the section 71 notice, as the organism was nominated for inclusion on the DSL after the survey took place.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in the draft Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0, Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7, Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 12713, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis ATCC 6051T, Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum ATCC 55406, Bacillus species 16970-5, Bacillus species 2 18118-1, Bacillus species 4 18121-4 or Bacillus species 7 18129-3 (DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group). It is proposed to conclude that the DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group strains do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Also, based on the information presented in the draft Screening Assessment, the risk to human health from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0, Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7, Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 12713, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis ATCC 6051T, Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum ATCC 55406, Bacillus species 16970-5, Bacillus species 2 18118-1, Bacillus species 4 18121-4 or Bacillus species 7 18129-3 (DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group) is considered to be low. It is proposed to conclude that the DSL B. licheniformis/subtilis group strains do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 13563-0, Bacillus atrophaeus 18250-7, Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 12713, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051A, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 55405, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis ATCC 6051, Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum ATCC 55406, Bacillus species 16970-5, Bacillus species 2 18118-1, Bacillus species 4 18121-4 and Bacillus species 7 18129-3 do not meet any of the criteria as set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for these living organisms is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Escherichia hermannii (E. hermannii) strain ATCC (see footnote 3) 700368 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of E. hermannii Strain ATCC 700368

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a Screening Assessment of a strain of Escherichia hermannii (ATCC 700368). This strain was added to the Domestic Substances List under subsection 25(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1988 and under subsection 105(1) of CEPA 1999 because it was manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986.

E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 is a non-spore-forming Gramnegative bacterium. The species has a complex and ambiguous taxonomy: it was originally classified as an atypical E. coli, and recent phylogenetic studies suggest that E. hermannii is more closely related to genera other than Escherichia within the family Enterobacteriaceae. Reports of isolation of E. hermannii are rare but include a range of sources, notably humans, raw and processed food, animals and their food products, plants, and terrestrial, aquatic and marine environments. E. hermannii plays a role in the nitrogen and sulphur cycle and can tolerate environments contaminated with toxic hydrocarbons and metals. These properties make it of possible commercial interest. Potential uses of E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 reported in the public domain include bioremediation, biodegradation, industrial effluent treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (particularly in oil and grease traps as well as in sewage sludge), odour control, organic waste treatment, composting and disposal of solid wastes from industrial uses.

There is no evidence in the scientific literature to suggest that E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 is likely to have adverse effects on animal or plant populations in the environment. However, because E. hermannii has been only rarely isolated, there may not have been sufficient exposure of environmental species to E. hermannii strains in nature to observe or document an ability to cause disease in plants or animals. Therefore, there is some uncertainty about the pathogenic potential of E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 and its effects on the environment. It was difficult to identify a suitable surrogate microorganism or surrogate information.

Although E. hermannii has occasionally been described as an opportunistic human pathogen, and there is evidence in the literature to demonstrate that some strains contain determinants of pathogenicity, there are no reports linking E. hermannii to the production of known toxins. Infections involving E. hermannii as the putative primary pathogen are very rare and occur in individuals predisposed to infection or involve a significant breach in normal barriers against infection; like most living organisms, E. hermannii can cause adverse effects if introduced into normally sterile body compartments. The majority of case reports involving E. hermannii were polymicrobial, and the other living organisms involved were considered to be the primary pathogens. E. hermannii has also been isolated from diarrheal stools, although rarely so, and has never been demonstrated to be the cause of disease.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA 1999, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA 1999, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009. Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in the draft Screening Assessment, including the identified uncertainty, there is a low risk of harm to organisms in the environment from E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368. It is proposed to conclude that E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Also, based on the information presented in the draft Screening Assessment, the risk to human health from E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 is considered to be low. It is proposed to conclude that E. hermannii strain ATCC 700368 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that Escherichia hermannii strain ATCC 700368 does not meet any of the criteria as set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of benzidine-based dyes and related substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (section 68 or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 40 of the 42 benzidine-based dyes and related substances identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance TDBD (CAS RN (see footnote 4) 1871-22-3) is currently subject to the significant new activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on 40 of the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMB·2HCl pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the 42 substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMB·2HCl at this time.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the 40 remaining substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that, pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Act, the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List such that TDBD (CAS RN 1871-22-3) is no longer subject to the significant new activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Final Screening Assessment of Benzidine-based Dyes and Related Substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a Screening Assessment on 9 benzidine-based acid dyes, 24 benzidine-based direct dyes, 2 benzidine-based cationic indicators, 2 benzidine-based precursors and 5 benzidine derivatives. These 42 substances constitute five subgroups of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substances Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on structural similarity and applications. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN), Domestic Substances List (DSL) name, and Colour Index generic name or acronym of the 42 substances are presented in the following tables, by subgroup.

Identity of the nine benzidine-based acid dyes in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or acronym
3701-40-4 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-2,2′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo], disodium salt Acid Red 99
6459-94-5 1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 8-[[3,3′-dimethyl-4′-[[4-[[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]oxy]phenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-7-hydroxy-, disodium salt Acid Red 114
6470-20-8 [1,1′-Biphenyl]-2,2′-disulfonic acid, 4-[(4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)azo]-4′-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-, disodium salt Acid Orange 56
6548-30-7 1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 8-[[3,3′-dimethoxy-4′-[[4-[[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]oxy]phenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-7-hydroxy-, disodium salt Acid Red 128
68318-35-4 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4′-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-5-hydroxy-6-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-, trisodium salt Acid Black 209
68400-36-2 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-6-[[4′-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-3-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-, disodium salt NAAHD
83221-63-0 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4′-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]-2,2′-disulfo[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-, sodium salt NAADD
89923-60-4 Benzenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(2,2′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[azo(4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-pyrazole-4,1-diyl)]]bis[4-chloro-, disodium salt BADB
10169-02-5 [1,1′-Biphenyl]-2,2′-disulfonic acid, 4,4′-bis[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-, disodium salt Acid Red 97

Identity of the 24 benzidine-based direct dyes in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or acronym
72-57-1 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetrasodium salt Direct Blue 14
573-58-0 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diylbis(azo)]bis[4-amino-, disodium salt Direct Red 28
992-59-6 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-amino-, disodium salt Direct Red 2
2150-54-1 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4,5-dihydroxy-, tetrasodium salt Direct Blue 25
2429-71-2 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, disodium salt Direct Blue 8
2429-74-5 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetrasodium salt Direct Blue 15
6420-06-0 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-5-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, disodium salt Direct Violet 28
6420-22-0 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-3-[[4′-[(6-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, trisodium salt Direct Blue 295
6449-35-0 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4′-[(6-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, disodium salt Direct Blue 151
6548-29-4 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4,4′-[(3,3′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[3-amino-, tetrasodium salt Direct Red 46
6655-95-4 Acetic acid, 2,2′-[[4,4′-bis[[1-hydroxy-6-[(4-methoxyphenyl)amino]-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-3,3′-diyl]bis(oxy)]bis-, tetrasodium salt Direct Blue 158
16071-86-6 Cuprate(2−), [5-[[4′-[[2,6-dihydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo][1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxybenzoato(4-)]-, disodium Direct Brown 95
67923-89-1 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, trilithium salt NAAH·3Li
70210-28-5 Benzoic acid, 5-[[4′-[[6-amino-5-(1H-benzotriazol-5-ylazo)-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxy-4-methyl-, disodium salt BABHS
71215-83-3 Benzoic acid, 5-[[4′-[(2-amino-8-hydroxy-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-2,2′-dichloro[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-2-hydroxy-, disodium salt BAHSD
71550-22-6 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, tetralithium salt NADB·4Li
72252-59-6 [1,1′-Biphenyl]-3,3′-dicarboxylic acid, 4-[[5-[[5-(aminosulfonyl)-2-hydroxyphenyl]azo]-1-hydroxy-6-(phenylamino)-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-4′-[[1-[[(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-oxopropyl]azo]-, tetrasodium salt BDAAH
75659-72-2 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, monolithium trisodium salt NADB·Li·3Na
75659-73-3 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, dilithium disodium salt NADB·2Li·2Na
75673-18-6 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, monolithium disodium salt NAAH·Li·2Na
75673-19-7 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-4-hydroxy-3-[[4′-[(1-hydroxy-4-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]azo]-, dilithium monosodium salt NAAH·2Li·Na
75673-34-6 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, dilithium salt NADB·2Li
75673-35-7 1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[4-hydroxy-, monolithium monosodium salt NADB·Li·Na
75752-17-9 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis(azo)]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, trilithium monosodium salt NADB·3Li·Na

Identity of the two benzidine-based cationic indicators in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or acronym
298-83-9 2H-Tetrazolium, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[2-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-, dichloride TDBPD
1871-22-3 2H-Tetrazolium, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[2,5-diphenyl-, dichloride TDBD

Identity of the two benzidine-based precursors in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or acronym
91-92-9 2-Naphthalenecarboxamide, N,N′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis[3-hydroxy- Naphthol AS-BR
93940-21-7 1-Triazene-1-carbonitrile, 3,3′-(3,3′-dimethoxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4,4′-diyl)bis- TCDB

Identity of the five benzidine derivatives in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Colour Index name or acronym
91-97-4 1,1′-Biphenyl, 4,4′-diisocyanato-3,3′-dimethyl- TODI
119-90-4 [1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethoxy- 3,3′-DMOB
119-93-7 (see reference 1) [1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethyl- 3,3′-DMB
366-29-0 [1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl- 4N-TMB
612-82-8 (see reference 2) 1,1′-Biphenyl]-4,4′-diamine, 3,3′-dimethyl-, dihydrochloride 3,3′-DMB·2HCl

Reference 1
These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.

Reference 2
These substances were not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but were included in this assessment as they were considered as priorities based on other human health concerns.

For the purpose of this Screening Assessment, four subgroups (benzidine-based acid dyes, direct dyes, cationic indicators and precursors) are collectively referred to as “benzidine-based substances” while benzidine-based acid dyes and benzidine-based direct dyes are collectively referred to as “benzidine-based dyes.”

The majority of the benzidine-based substances and benzidine derivatives in this grouping were not reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities above 100 kg/year according to recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA 1999.

Environment

Benzidine-based dyes are anionic molecules that have relatively high water solubility (greater than 1 g/L) and are expected to dissociate at environmentally relevant pH levels. When considering potential releases of benzidine-based dyes to the environment, it is expected that the chemistry of these substances results in their partitioning to water, sediment and soil. Benzidine-based dyes have low experimental log octanol–water partition coefficients (Kow) and low fish bioconcentration factors (BCFs), indicating that these dyes are not likely to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. According to empirical and modelled data, benzidine-based dyes are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil); however, they may degrade and transform into certain benzidine derivatives if they reach anaerobic environments. Based on aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity data (including both empirical and read-across data), benzidine-based dyes have the potential to cause harm to aquatic and terrestrial organisms at low concentrations. A conservative aquatic exposure analysis of the textile wet processing sector and a conservative terrestrial exposure analysis of the application of biosolids to land were done because such processing and application were anticipated to present the highest potential ecological risks related to the industrial release of these substances. The predicted environmental concentrations for benzidine-based dyes in aquatic and terrestrial environments were compared with the predicted no-effect concentrations for each compartment, and the calculated risk quotients were all below one. Considering all available lines of evidence with respect to the persistence, potential bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity, industrial uses and potential releases of the substances, it is concluded that benzidine-based dyes have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

Benzidine-based cationic indicators also have relatively high water solubility and are expected to dissociate at environmentally relevant pH levels. Given their high water solubility and affinity for negatively charged organic particles, potential releases would be expected to partition to water, sediment and soil. Since benzidine-based cationic indicators are charged, they have low experimental log Kow values. While BCFs were not available for these substances, the latter are similar enough in physical and chemical properties to benzidine-based dyes to suggest that they are not likely to bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Benzidine-based cationic indicators are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil); however, benzidine-based cationic indicators may degrade and transform to certain benzidine derivatives if they reach anaerobic environments. Based on aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity data (including both empirical and read-across data), benzidine-based cationic indicators have the potential to cause harm to aquatic organisms at low concentrations. However, considering all lines of evidence for these two benzidine-based cationic indicators, particularly as no commercial activity in Canada was reported, it is believed that the substances would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is concluded that these benzidine-based cationic indicators have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

The benzidine-based precursors, Naphthol AS-BR and TCDB, were assessed individually, since their physical and chemical properties and chemical structures are very different. Models were used to predict most results, as no close analogues with relevant data could be found. Naphthol AS-BR is sparingly soluble and not expected to dissociate under environmentally relevant pH levels, so it is expected to reside mostly in soil or sediment if released to the environment. TCDB is moderately soluble and is expected to dissociate readily and stay in the water column or bind with particles, given its acidic character. Both benzidine-based precursors have moderate to high estimated log Kow values and moderate to high modelled aquatic BCFs. Modelled data show that these substances, despite some tendency to bioaccumulate, may metabolize significantly. These benzidine-based precursors are expected to biodegrade very slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil). Based on two sets of modelled aquatic toxicity data for acute and chronic endpoints, both TCDB and Naphthol AS-BR have the potential to cause harm to aquatic organisms at low concentrations (pivotal values <1 mg/L). Considering all lines of evidence, including the fact that TCDB and Naphthol AS-BR are not known to be in commerce in Canada, it is believed that these substances would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is concluded that these benzidine-based precursors have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

Benzidine derivatives are generally moderately soluble, have low to moderate log Kow values and will ionize at low pH levels. Based on these properties, as well as their high potential for binding to particulate matter and sediment, these substances are expected to be found in water, sediment and soil if released to the environment. Empirical and modelled data indicate that benzidine derivatives biodegrade slowly in aerobic environments (water, sediment and soil). Moderate to high water solubility, low to moderate log Kow values as well as a low empirical BCF for 3,3′-DMB indicate that benzidine derivatives will not bioconcentrate in aquatic organisms. Empirical and modelled data indicate that benzidine derivatives are moderately to highly toxic to aquatic organisms. However, given that these substances do not have the potential to be released to the environment in high volumes, as they were not reported to be manufactured or imported in Canada in quantities above 100 kg/year, according to recent regulatory surveys, it is believed that benzidine derivatives would not present a risk to the environment. Therefore, it is concluded that these five benzidine derivatives have a low potential to cause ecological harm in Canada.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the 42 benzidine-based dyes and related substances evaluated in this assessment. It is concluded that these benzidine-based dyes and related substances do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

A critical effect for certain benzidine-based substances is potential carcinogenicity via reductive cleavage of the azo bonds and release of aromatic amines, which can be converted to reactive intermediates through metabolic oxidation. Therefore, benzidine-based substances are evaluated by examining their hazard potential (e.g. ability to undergo reductive cleavage and hazard potential of the corresponding aromatic amines) together with their potential for exposure of the general population of Canada. Similarly, the benzidine derivatives are evaluated for their hazard potential, together with their potential for exposure of the general population.

Exposure of the general population to benzidine-based substances and derivatives from environmental media is not expected due to limited commercial quantities in Canada. Therefore, risk to human health from these sources is not expected.

Available information indicates that residual 3,3′-DMB may leach into foods being prepared with polyamide cooking utensils. The margins between the estimated daily oral exposure from use of polyamide cooking utensils and critical effect levels are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

The benzidine derivatives 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMOB are regulated in textiles in the European Union. Two European surveys, as well as a Japanese study, indicate that 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMOB are occasionally detected in some textiles and leather products, some of which were reported to be imported from other countries. These two benzidine derivatives could therefore be present in imported products in Canada, as the Canadian textile market is predominantly composed of imported products. Testing of products on the Canadian market, however, did not identify these two benzidine derivatives in imported and domestic textile and leather products. Exposure to 3,3′-DMB and 3,3′-DMOB from textiles and leather is considered to be limited, and direct and prolonged skin contact is not expected. Therefore, risk to human health is not expected.

Exposure of the general population to the other three benzidine derivatives (3,3′-DMB·2HCl, TODI and 4N-TMB) is not expected. Therefore, risk to human health is not expected.

Three of the five benzidine derivatives in this assessment (3,3′-DMB, 3,3′-DMB·2HCl and 3,3′-DMOB) have effects of concern based on their potential carcinogenicity.

The potential for exposure of the general population due to dermal contact with textile clothing and leather articles was identified for one of the benzidine-based acid dyes, Acid Red 97. Although exposure to Acid Red 97 is expected for the general population, the hazard potential, based on available information, is considered low. Accordingly, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

For the remaining benzidine-based acid dyes and all of the benzidine-based direct dyes in this assessment, available information (including surveys conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 and information on uses pursuant to the Food and Drugs Act) indicates that exposure from textiles and leather is considered to be limited; direct and prolonged skin contact is not expected. Therefore, risk to human health is not expected.

Exposure of the general population to the two benzidine-based precursors and two benzidine-based cationic indicators in this assessment is not expected. Therefore, risk to human health is not expected.

Some of the benzidine-based acid dyes, benzidine-based direct dyes, and benzidine-based precursors in this assessment have effects of concern based on potential carcinogenicity. These include the benzidine-based substances that may release benzidine, 3,3′-dichlorobenzidine (3,3′-DCB), 3,3′-DMB, 3,3′-DMOB, 2,2′-dimethylbenzidine (2,2′-DMB) or 2,2′-dichlorobenzidine (2,2′-DCB).

Based on the information presented in this Screening Assessment, it is concluded that the benzidine-based dyes and related substances evaluated in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that the benzidine-based dyes and related substances evaluated in this assessment do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Although a risk to human health has not been identified for the general population of Canada at current levels of exposure, some substances in this assessment are recognized to have effects of concern based on their potential carcinogenicity. There may be a concern for human health if exposure of the general population of Canada to these substances were to increase in products available to consumers such as textiles, cosmetics and food.

Options on how best to monitor changes in the use profile of these substances are being investigated. Stakeholders will have the opportunity to provide feedback on a consultation document, describing potential options for information gathering or preventive actions, to be published once assessments for all of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping are completed.

The current Screening Assessment concludes that the potential ecological concern identified in the previous assessment of TDBD (CAS RN 1871-22-3) with respect to new uses as described in the final Screening Assessment of 145 persistent, bioaccumulative and inherently toxic (PBiT) substances, published in April 2008, has changed. The current Screening Assessment concludes that TDBD is no longer of concern for the environment, nor considered as having effects of concern. Consequently, the rescission of the significant new activities provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act is being considered.

The Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position Order in Council
Bertrand, Stephan J.

2014-1237

Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board

 

Full-time member

 
Government of Manitoba

2014-1256

Administrators

 

Joyal, The Hon. Glenn D.

 

November 12 to November 16, 2014

 

Monnin, The Hon. Michel A.

 

December 8 to December 12, 2014

 
Government of Ontario

2014-1255

Administrators

 

Feldman, The Hon. Kathryn N.

 

November 15 to November 17, 2014

 

Smith, The Hon. Heather J.

 

November 11 to November 14, 2014

 
Johnston, The Hon. Robert T. C.

2014-1257

Government of British Columbia

 

Administrator

 

November 24 to November 27, 2014

 
The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc.  

Chairperson

 

Kefalas, Apostolos Paul

2014-1240

Chief Executive Officer

 

Carlin, Glen Patrick

2014-1239

November 21, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-017-14 — Release of RSS-251, Issue 1

Industry Canada hereby gives notice that the following document will come into force upon publication on the Industry Canada Web site:

Radio Standards Specification RSS-251, Issue 1, Field Disturbance Sensors in the Bands 46.7-46.9 GHz (Vehicular Radar) and 76-77 GHz (Vehicular and Airport Fixed Radar)

Industry Canada published the above-mentioned document to outline the technical compliance requirements for licence-exempt Category I radio apparatus operating in the bands 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76-77 GHz.

General information

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada.

The Radio Equipment Technical Standards List will be amended to reflect the above-mentioned changes.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are asked to provide their comments in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF), within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice, to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca).

All submissions received by the close of the comment period will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

October 17, 2014

DANIEL DUGUAY
Acting Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Sarnia Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Craig Huggett

Ottawa, November 6, 2014

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Sarnia Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Frank Rodin

Ottawa, November 6, 2014

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation

Notice of an amendment to the fees charged by Western Canada Marine Response Corporation pursuant to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

Description

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC) currently is a certified response organization pursuant to section 169 of the Act in respect of a rated capability of 10 000 tonnes and a geographic area covering the waters bordering British Columbia (including the shorelines associated with such waters) and excluding waters north of 60° north latitude.

Definitions

1. In this notice of fees,

“Act” means the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. (Loi)

“asphalt” means a derivate of oil that is commercially described as road or paving asphalt or unblended roofers flux, that has a specific gravity equal to or greater than one, that is solid at 15 degrees Celsius and that sinks to the bottom as a solid when immersed in water. (asphalte)

“BOCF” means bulk oil cargo fee. [droits sur les produits pétroliers en vrac (DPPV)]

“CALF” means capital asset/loan fee. [droits d’immobilisations et d’emprunt (DIE)]

“oil handling facility” means an oil handling facility that is prescribed pursuant to the Act and is located in WCMRC’s geographic area. (installation de manutention d’hydrocarbures)

“ship (bulk oil)” means a ship that is constructed or adapted primarily to carry bulk oil in its cargo spaces. [navire (avec produits pétroliers en vrac)]

Registration Fees

2. The registration fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the registration fees set out in Part I of this notice.

PART I

3. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total registration fee payable by a prescribed oil handling facility shall be determined as set out in section 5 of this Part.

4. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total registration fee payable by a ship shall be determined as set out in section 6 of this Part.

5. The registration fee applicable in respect of the annual membership fees is seven hundred and seventy-five dollars and zero cents ($775.00) per prescribed oil handling facility, plus all applicable taxes, from January 1, 2015.

6. The registration fee applicable in respect of the annual membership fees is seven hundred and seventy-five dollars and zero cents ($775.00) per ship, plus all applicable taxes, from January 1, 2015.

Bulk Oil Cargo Fees

7. The bulk oil cargo fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the bulk oil cargo fees set out in Part II of this notice.

PART II

8. This part applies to the loading and unloading of oil within WCMRC’s Geographic Area of Response (GAR).

9. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total BOCF payable by a prescribed oil handling facility shall be determined by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil unloaded (and in the case of bulk oil intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude loaded at the prescribed oil handling facility) by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part.

10. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total BOCF payable by a ship (bulk oil) shall be determined,

  • (a) in the case of bulk oil loaded onto the ship (bulk oil) and intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil loaded at an oil handling facility that is within WCMRC’s geographic area, and that does not have an arrangement with WCMRC, by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part;
  • (b) in the case of bulk oil unloaded from the ship (bulk oil), by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil unloaded at an oil handling facility that is within WCMRC’s geographic area, and that does not have an arrangement with WCMRC, by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part;
  • (c) in the case of bulk oil loaded onto the ship (bulk oil) outside WCMRC’s geographic area which is transferred within WCMRC’s geographic area to another ship for use as fuel by such ship, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil transferred by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part; and
  • (d) in the case of bulk oil received by the ship (bulk oil) within WCMRC’s geographic area from another ship as cargo where such bulk oil is intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil received by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 11 and 12 of this Part.

11. The BOCF applicable in respect of oil (other than asphalt) is

  • (a) an amended fee of one dollar and fifty-one and four-tenths cents ($1.514) per tonne, plus all applicable taxes, from January 1, 2015.

12. The BOCF applicable in respect of asphalt is

  • (a) an amended fee of seventy-five and seven-tenths cents ($0.757) per tonne, plus all applicable taxes, from January 1, 2015.
Capital Asset Loan Fees

13. The capital asset/loan fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the capital asset/loan fees set out in Part III of this notice.

PART III

14. The capital asset/loan fee (CALF) is determined according to the following:

  • (a) on the basis of cost per tonne;
  • (b) by multiplying a capital asset/loan fee rate (CALFR) by the applicable quantity of bulk oil loaded or unloaded within WCMRC’s Geographic Area of Response (GAR), and where applicable, bulk oil cargo transferred between ships within WCMRC’s GAR;
  • (c) by dividing the forecast annual Funds Required for Capital Purchases (1) of WCMRC, plus the provision for tax (2) by the forecast Annual Volume (3) of bulk oil cargo to be loaded or unloaded within WCMRC’s GAR (4);
  • (d) Funds Required for Capital Purchases (1) = Annual Capital Budget plus the annual principal bank loan repayment, less amortization of capital assets (excluding amortization of assets purchased previously with the BOCF);
  • (e) Provision for tax (2) = (Funds Required for Capital Purchases less amortization of capital assets purchased previously with the BOCF) multiplied by the applicable rate of tax;
  • (f) Annual Volume (3) = Total volume of bulk oil cargo unloaded plus total volume of bulk oil loaded for international destinations and north of 60° north latitude within WCMRC’s GAR and, where applicable, bulk oil cargo transferred between ships within WCMRC’s GAR; and
  • (g) GAR (4) = Geographic area of response for which WCMRC is certified to operate.

15. The CALFR calculated by the above formula is applicable to all products except asphalt. The CALFR for asphalt is 50% of the rate for all other products.

16. The CALF applicable in respect of asphalt is

  • (a) an amended fee of zero cents ($0.000) per tonne, from January 1, 2015.

17. The CALF applicable in respect of other products is

  • (a) an amended fee of zero cents ($0.000) per tonne, from January 1, 2015.

Interested persons may, within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice, file notices of objection that contain the reasons for the objection to the Manager, Environmental Response Systems, Marine Safety and Security, Transport Canada, Place de Ville, Tower C, 10th Floor, 330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N8, 613-993-8196 (fax), oep-epe@tc.gc.ca (email). All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the name of the response organization submitting the list of proposed amended fees, and the date of publication of the notice of proposed amended fees.

November 4, 2014

MARK JOHNCOX, CA

[48-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at October 31, 2014

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

8.5

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

3.4

 
   

3.4

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

20,835.7

 

Government of Canada bonds

72,010.9

 

Other investments

350.7

 
   

93,197.3

Property and equipment

 

264.9

Intangible assets

 

42.9

Other assets

 

173.9

 

93,690.9


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

67,379.9

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,794.7

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

300.3

 

Other deposits

1,193.0

 
   

25,288.0

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

577.4

 
   

577.4

   

93,245.3

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

315.6

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
   

445.6

93,690.9

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, November 18, 2014

CARMEN VIERULA
Chief Accountant and Chief Financial Officer

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, November 18, 2014

STEPHEN S. POLOZ
Governor

[48-1-o]

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 2012, c. 19, s. 703 and ss. 710(3)
  • Footnote b
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote c
    S.C. 2012, c. 19, s. 703 and ss. 710(3)
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 2001, c. 27
  • Footnote 1
    Accession number. Substances added to the confidential portion of the Domestic Substances List are given accession numbers.
  • Footnote 2
    ATCC: American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 3
    ATCC: American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 4
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.