ARCHIVED — Vol. 149, No. 11 — March 14, 2015

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

STRENGTHENING CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP ACT

Notice requesting comments on a proposal to amend the Citizenship Regulations to implement provisions of the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act and to make other regulations as a result

Summary

Notice is hereby given that Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is seeking written comments from all interested parties on a proposal to amend the Citizenship Regulations (the Regulations) and make other regulations as a result of amendments to the Citizenship Act (the Act) made pursuant to the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act (SCCA).

Background

The SCCA received royal assent on June 19, 2014, fulfilling the Government’s commitment in the 2013 Speech from the Throne to strengthen and protect the value of Canadian citizenship by introducing the first comprehensive reforms to the Citizenship Act in more than a generation.

The proposed regulatory amendments are intended to improve processing efficiency in the citizenship program, reinforce the value of Canadian citizenship, strengthen integrity and combat fraud, and protect and promote Canada’s interests and values.

These changes will strengthen the value of citizenship while encouraging access to citizenship for qualified applicants. Overall, the changes will ensure that new citizens are better prepared to assume the responsibilities of citizenship, that only qualified applicants obtain citizenship and that the citizenship program is efficient and timely.

Description

The purpose of this Notice of Intent is to signal an intention to amend the Regulations in order to support the changes being made to the Citizenship Act pursuant to the SCCA. The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has the authority, under the SCCA, to make regulations in the areas described below.

Language proficiency requirements: Currently, adult citizenship applicants 18 years of age and over have to demonstrate adequate knowledge of one of Canada’s official languages. Since November 2012, adult applicants must provide evidence of language proficiency along with their application. The SCCA requires citizenship applicants from 14 to 64 to demonstrate that they have an adequate knowledge of English or French. The proposed regulations in this area would require citizenship applicants 14 to 17 years of age to provide upfront evidence of language proficiency. Existing forms of language evidence currently accepted by CIC for adult applicants will be extended to applicants 14 to 17 years of age, along with other forms of evidence the applicants already have or that are easily accessible.

Residency requirements: The SCCA specifies that only physical presence in Canada after a person becomes a permanent resident can count towards meeting the citizenship residence requirement. It also requires adult applicants to have accumulated 1 460 days (four years) of physical presence in Canada, within the six-year period immediately before the date of their application. Finally, the SCCA specifies that applicants must be physically present in Canada for at least 183 days during each of four calendar years that are fully or partially within the six years immediately before the person’s application to be eligible for citizenship. The proposed regulations in this area would specify that citizenship applicants must provide upfront evidence that they have met the residency requirements outlined in the SCCA. The proposed regulations may also include the required form of evidence, such as the completed residence calculator.

Income tax filing requirement: The SCCA specifies that to be eligible for citizenship, all adult applicants must have met any applicable requirement under the Income Tax Act to file a return of income in respect of four taxation years that are fully or partially within the six years immediately before the person’s application. The proposed regulations in this area would specify that citizenship applicants must provide upfront evidence that they have met the tax filing requirement outlined in the SCCA. The proposed regulations may also include the required form of evidence, such as the applicant’s social insurance number.

Fast-tracked citizenship applications for members of the Canadian Armed Forces: The SCCA specifies that members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) need to complete three years of service in the CAF within the six years immediately before applying for citizenship in order to be eligible to apply for the fast-track grant of citizenship. The proposed regulations in this area would specify that members of the CAF are required to provide upfront evidence that they meet the service requirement for fast-tracked citizenship applications. The proposed regulations may also include the required form of evidence, such as a letter from the applicant’s Commanding Officer.

Revocation: The SCCA specifies that the Minister may make regulations prescribing the manner in which and the place at which applications are to be made and notices are to be given under the Citizenship Act and specifying the information and evidence that is to be provided in support of them. The proposed regulations in this area would specify the manner in which notices are sent in relation to revocation proceedings, such as by personal delivery, or regular or electronic mail, including notices with respect to decisions.

Adoption: The SCCA extends access to the adoption grant provisions under section 5.1 of the Citizenship Act to persons adopted before January 1, 1947 (or April 1, 1949, in the case of Newfoundland and Labrador). Prior to these legislative changes, persons adopted before these dates who wanted to acquire Canadian citizenship would have had to apply for permanent residence and then apply for and meet the requirements for a regular grant of Canadian citizenship. The proposed regulations in this area would specify the evidence that is required to support an application for a grant of citizenship under section 5.1 of the Citizenship Act in respect of those applicants who were adopted before January 1, 1947 (or April 1, 1949, in the case of an adoption in Newfoundland and Labrador) by a person who became a citizen on that date. The proposed regulations may also include the required form of evidence.

Consultants: The SCCA specifies that the Minister may, by regulation, designate a body whose members in good standing may represent or advise a person for consideration — or offer to do so — in connection with a proceeding or application made under the Act.  Accordingly, under this authority, the Minister proposes to designate the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC). The Minister may also make regulations respecting the acceptance for the processing of applications made under the Act by a person who has been represented or advised by a third party for consideration. And lastly, the Minister may, by regulation, also provide for any transitional issues raised by the act of designating a regulatory body.

Comments

This Notice of Intent is an opportunity for the public to provide comments and input into the proposed regulatory amendments described above before the regulations are published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Anyone may, within 30 days of the publication of this notice, provide comments on this Notice of Intent, in writing, to the person named below at the address provided.

Questions and requests for additional information, as well as comments on this Notice of Intent, may be directed to Teny Dikranian, Director, Legislation and Program Policy, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, 180 Kent Street, 6th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1L1, 613-991-2485 (fax), Citizenship-Citoyennete@cic.gc.ca (email).

TENY DIKRANIAN
Director
Legislation and Program Policy

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 17909

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance 9-Decenamide, N,N-dimethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1356964-77-6 under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas the substance is a chemical on the Non-domestic Substances List and, for this reason, it can be imported or manufactured in a quantity of up to 1 000 kg in a calendar year without providing information to the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the Ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance 9-Decenamide, N,N-dimethyl-, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 100 kg per calendar year in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act or in any natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
    • (b) the information specified in item 7 of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
    • (c) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
    • (d) the identification of every government department or government agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and, if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency; and
    • (e) the test data and a test report from a dermal toxicity study, in respect of the substance, conducted according to the methodology described in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 411 entitled Subchronic Dermal Toxicity: 90-day Study and in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (“Principles of GLP”) set out in Annex 2 of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, where the Test Guideline and Principles of GLP are current at the time the test data are developed.
  3. All other information and test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.
TRANSITIONAL PROVISION

5. Despite item 1, in relation to the substance 9-Decenamide, N,N-dimethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1356964-77-6 in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and December 31, 2015, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg during this period in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act or in any natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment to apply the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) to 9-decenamide, N,N-dimethyl-, pursuant to section 85 of that Act. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person wish to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice. (see footnote 1)

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to the substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person engaging in a significant new activity in relation to 9-decenamide, N,N-dimethyl- submit a Significant New Activity Notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days before using the substance for the significant new activity.

The Notice applies to any person who intends to use 9-decenamide, N,N-dimethyl- for a significant new activity.

The activities with respect to 9-decenamide, N,N-dimethyl- requiring a SNAN submission involve its use in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act or its use in a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations. These activities have not been identified as presently occurring in Canada.

Activities not subject to the Notice

This Notice does not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under any Act of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA 1999, the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. It also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates that are not isolated and are likely not released, impurities, contaminants or partially unreacted intermediates related to the preparation of a substance, or, in some circumstances, to items such as wastes, mixtures or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the SNAc provisions. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA 1999, and section 3.2 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional details. (see footnote 2)

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance 9-decenamide, N,N-dimethyl- is used for a significant new activity.

With regard to the information requested from a dermal toxicity study, particular attention should be paid to α2u globulin-mediated renal toxicity to elucidate potential toxicological pathways. This information is required to determine if the results are specific to rats or whether they could occur in humans.

Environment Canada and Health Canada will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The assessment of the substance has identified potential concerns related to dermal toxicity as well as irritation to the eyes, corrosiveness to the skin and effects on the kidney. The Significant New Activity Notice was issued to obtain information to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before it is used in cosmetics or drugs, as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, or in natural health products, as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.

The Notice references elements of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) (see footnote 3) to detail some of the information requirements being imposed. Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers. (see footnote 4)

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a particular Notice applies, (see footnote 5) a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they ought to have access. The phrase “to which they ought to have access” means information in any of the company’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).

Although an MSDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the MSDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an MSDS may not list all substances that may be subject to SNAc provisions due to public health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If a person involved in activities with the substance obtains any information that reasonably supports the conclusion that this substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA 1999, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. Where a person receives possession and control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by the original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note, Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 provides more detail on this subject. (see footnote 6)

Under section 86 of CEPA 1999, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc shall notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Notice.

This substance is a new chemical substance on the Non-domestic Substances List and as such can be manufactured or imported in a quantity of up to 1 000 kg in a calendar year without triggering the requirement to provide information to the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(1) of the CEPA 1999.

A transitional provision was included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The Notice comes into force immediately with a threshold of 1 000 kg per calendar year to define what constitutes a significant new activity. However, on January 1, 2016, this threshold will be lowered to 100 kg per calendar year.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is available for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with this Notice or believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to contact the Substances Management Information Line. (see footnote 7) The program will work with the person to help them comply with the Notice. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent and history of compliance.

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ACT

Notice of annual increase of Health Canada’s Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product fees

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Health, under the Ministerial Authority to Enter into Contract, hereby updates the fees that are payable for the provision of Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product services by 2 %, beginning April 1, 2015. These fees will continue to be updated annually, with an automatic 2% increase to align with the Drug Program’s regulatory user fees.

This change is effective beginning on April 1, 2015. The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2015, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Diana Dowthwaite, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone), cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

Services Fee as of April 1, 2014 Fee as of April 1, 2015
Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (or a supplemental copy of a Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product) $80 $82
Drug Master Files $416 $424
Drug Master Files — letter of access $188 $191
Drug Master Files — biannual updates $188 $191

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Notice of annual increase of fees

Notice is hereby given, under section 19.2 of the Financial Administration Act, that in keeping with section 4 of the 2011 Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations, every fee outlined by the Regulations is to be increased annually by 2%, rounded up to the nearest dollar.

The revised fees updated as of April 1, 2015, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Diana Dowthwaite, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone), cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

Fee Category Section in Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations Fee with Penalties as of November 6, 2014 Fee as of April 1, 2015
PART 2 — DRUGS
Fees For Examination Services — Schedule 1
New active substance 6   $328,498
Clinical or non-clinical data and chemistry and manufacturing data 6   $166,383
Clinical or non-clinical data only 6   $77,655
Comparative studies 6   $46,937
Chemistry and manufacturing data only 6   $22,192
  • ANDS — Pharma only
6 $10,878 $11,096
Published data only 6   $18,402
Switch status from prescription drug to non-prescription drug 6   $44,685
Labelling only 6   $2,990
Administrative submission 6   $310
Disinfectants 6   $4,137
Drug identification number application — labelling standards 6   $1,658
Remission
Remission processing fee 11(1)(a)(iii)   $543
Establishment Licence Fees
Fabrication of Drugs — Schedule 2
Basic fee 19(1), 27, 28(1)(a), 28(2)(a)   $16,725
Each additional category 19(1)(a)   $4,191
Dosage form classes
  • 2 classes
19(1)(b)   $8,369
  • 3 classes
19(1)(b)   $16,725
  • 4 classes
19(1)(b)   $20,916
  • 5 classes
19(1)(b)   $25,092
  • 6 classes
19(1)(b)   $29,270
Each additional class 19(1)(b)   $1,679
Sterile dosage forms 19(1)(c)   $8,369
Packing/Labelling of Drugs — Schedule 3
Basic fee 20(1), 20(3)(a), 28(1)(b), 28(2)(b)   $11,183
Each additional category 20(1)(a)   $2,794
Dosage form classes
  • 2 classes
20(1)(b)   $5,577
  • 3 or more classes
20(1)(b)   $8,369
Importation and Distribution of Drugs — Schedule 4
Basic fee 21(a), 22, 28(1)(c) and (d), 28(2)(c) and (d)   $6,973
Each additional category 21(a)(i), 22(a)   $1,745
Dosage form classes
  • 2 classes
21(a)(ii), 22(b)   $3,488
  • 3 or more classes
21(a)(ii), 22(b)   $6,973
Each fabricator 21(b)(i)   $1,679
Each additional dosage form class for each fabricator 21(b)(ii)   $846
Distribution or Wholesaling
Distribution or wholesaling fee 23   $4,191
Testing
Testing fee 24   $2,794
Drug Analysis — Schedule 5
Vaccines (1) 25   $27,874
Drugs, not included in items 1, 6 and 9 of this Schedule, that are listed in Schedule D to the Food and Drugs Act 25   $11,151
Drugs for human use that are prescription drugs, controlled drugs or narcotics 25   $8,369
Drugs for human use, not included in any other item, for which a drug identification number has been assigned 25   $4,191
Radiopharmaceuticals 25   $0
Whole blood and its components (6) 25   $0
Hemodialysis products 25   $0
Drugs that are labelled as disinfectants, including those listed in paragraph 9(f) of this Schedule, but excluding other drugs labelled as disinfectants of medical devices 25   $0
Drugs that meet the requirements of a class monograph having one of the following titles (9)
  • Acne therapies
25   $0
  • Antidandruff products
25   $0
  • Antiperspirants
25   $0
  • Antiseptic skin cleaners
25   $0
  • Athlete’s foot treatments
25   $0
  • Contact lens disinfectants 9(f)
25   $0
  • Fluoride-containing anti-caries products
25   $0
  • Medicated skin care products
25   $0
  • Sunburn protectants
25   $0
  • Throat lozenges
25   $0
Fees for the Examination of Dealer’s Licence Applications
Dealer’s Licence
Dealer’s licence 31(1)   $4,884
Fees for Right to Sell Drugs
Annual fee 35(1)   $1,106
PART 3 — MEDICAL DEVICE FEES
Fees for the Examination of Medical Device Licence Applications
Class II Medical Devices
Class II — Licence application 39(1)   $381
Class III Medical Devices — Schedule 6
Licence application 40(1)(a), 41(a)   $5,469
Licence application for a near patient in vitro diagnostic devices 40(1)(a), 41(a)   $9,310
Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing 40(1)(a), 41(a)   $1,376
Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations 40(1)(a), 41(a)   $5,122
Class IV Medical Devices — Schedule 7
Licence application 40(1)(b), 41(b)   $12,720
Licence application for devices that contain human or animal tissue 40(1)(b), 41(b)   $11,866
Licence application for near patient in vitro diagnostic device 40(1)(b), 41(b)   $21,683
Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing 40(1)(b), 41(b)   $1,376
Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations 40(1)(b), 41(b)   $5,836
Remission
Remission processing fee 44(1)(a)(iii)   $57
Fee for Right to Sell Licensed Class II, III or IV Medical Devices
Fee (if annual gross revenue medical device sales is less than $20,000) 48(1)(a)   $57
Fee (in any other case) 48(1)(b)   $359
Fees for the Examination of an Application for an Establishment Licence
Medical devices establishment licence 51(1)   $7,794

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Parliamentary Secretaries to the 2015-196

Anderson, David

 

Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Armstrong, Scott

 

Minister of Employment and Social Development; Minister of Labour

 

McLeod, Cathy

 

Minister of Health; Minister of Western Economic Diversification

 

Trottier, Bernard

 

Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Warkentin, Chris

 

Minister of Public Works and Government Services

 

March 5, 2015

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADA COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS

Chairperson (part-time position)

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a federal Crown corporation created by an Act of Parliament in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” To fulfill this mandate, the Council offers a broad range of grants and services to professional Canadian artists and arts organizations in dance, music, theatre, visual arts, writing and publishing, media arts and integrated arts. It also promotes public awareness of the arts through its communications, research and arts promotion activities. The Canada Council Art Bank, the Public Lending Rights Commission, and the Canadian Commission for UNESCO are administered through the Council.

The CCA is governed by a board that is expected to provide strategic guidance to management and to oversee the activities of the Corporation. It has a duty to act in the best interests of the Corporation and to exercise care and due diligence. The Chairperson provides leadership and guidance to the Council in the formulation of strategic direction of the Corporation. He or she ensures the proper conduct of Council meetings in such a way that the Corporation carries out its mandate and objectives effectively, ensures good value for public funds, remains viable, and holds management accountable for its performance.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. Experience on a board of directors/trustees of a public, private or not-for-profit sector organization, preferably as a chairperson is sought, as is experience at the senior executive level within the private or public sector. The candidate would possess experience in the development of strategies, objectives, plans, and best business and/or organizational practices and in corporate governance. Experience in dealing with the federal government, preferably with senior government officials, and experience working or volunteering with organizations in the arts and cultural sectors would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate and activities of the CCA. Knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the Chairperson, the Board, and the Director and Chief Executive Officer is also desired. The candidate would possess knowledge of sound governance principles, strategic planning, monitoring and evaluation of performance. He or she would also be financially literate and possess knowledge of the federal government’s expectations with regard to accountability and reporting. Knowledge of the federal government’s cultural policy priorities and how these relate to the CCA is desired. Knowledge of and interest in the arts and cultural sectors, and familiarity with a range of artistic disciplines, would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would possess superior leadership and executive-level skills to enable the CCA to accomplish its work effectively and with a national perspective. He or she would be able to lead strategic discussions, foster debate among Council members, facilitate consensus and manage conflicts, should they arise. The ability to anticipate emerging issues and develop strategies to enable the Council to seize opportunities and solve problems is sought. The candidate would possess the ability to develop and maintain effective relationships with the Council’s senior management, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, her office, the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, and the CCA’s key stakeholders and partners. Superior communications skills, both written and oral, are desired.

The ideal candidate would be a strategic and innovative leader and be a person of sound judgment and integrity. In addition, he or she would possess high ethical standards and superior interpersonal skills, tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The Council meets generally four times per year in Ottawa, with occasional teleconference meetings as needed. The average annual time commitment is approximately four weeks.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. For more information please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at http://www.canadacouncil.ca/.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by March 30, 2015, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN MUSEUM FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

Director (Chief Executive Officer) [full-time position]

Salary range: From $177,400 to $208,600
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR), located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, was established as a federal Crown corporation on March 13, 2008. Its mandate is to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue. The Museum aspires to offer its visitors an inspiring encounter with human rights while exceeding Canadians’ expectations for balance, transparency, sound business practices and meaningful public consultation. It fosters an appreciation for the importance of human rights, spurs informed dialogue and invites participants to identify the contemporary relevance of past and present human rights events, both at home and abroad. The Museum exemplifies Canadians’ commitment to freedom and democracy and aims to ignite an informed, ever-evolving global conversation.

The Director is the Chief Executive Officer and, under the direction of the Board of Trustees, is responsible for providing corporate leadership for the management of the Corporation’s resources and assets and for the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations in meeting its mandated objectives.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of relevant education, job-related training and/or experience. Corporate leadership experience at the chief executive officer or senior executive level is sought, as is experience in managing complex partnerships and stakeholder relationships, including donors. The candidate should also have experience in dealing with external stakeholders, preferably with senior government officials, as well as experience in financial management and revenue generation. The ideal candidate would also have experience in strategic and high-performance management in an entrepreneurial environment in addition to experience in reporting to, working with, serving and/or engaging a board.

The candidate should possess knowledge of the current challenges and opportunities for Canadian cultural institutions and of the federal government’s policy agenda and how it relates to national museums. He or she would have general knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate and activities of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. The ideal candidate would also be knowledgeable about sound management and corporate governance, as well as risk management principles and practices. Knowledge of the cultural, patrimonial and/or recreational tourism sectors would be considered an asset, as would knowledge of international human rights issues that have potential implications on fundamental freedoms and democratic rights.

The ideal candidate would be an innovative, entrepreneurial and strategic leader who would have the ability to provide the corporate leadership, vision and strategic direction needed to ensure the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is able to carry out its mandate and achieve its objectives. In addition to the ability to identify, analyze and define priorities and strategies, the candidate would be resilient within a high scrutiny environment, and have the ability to spearhead outreach initiatives and actively market and promote the Museum’s brand to audiences across Canada and globally. Possessing superior interpersonal skills, sound judgment and integrity, the ideal candidate would be able to focus the energies and talents of the Corporation’s employees and motivate them to achieve corporate objectives. The candidate would demonstrate the ability to develop effective working relationships with the Board of Trustees, the Museum’s management, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and her Office, the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, and the Museum’s key stakeholders and partners. The ability to work effectively with the Museum’s key partners, including the other national museums, is also sought.

Superior communications skills, both written and oral, are desired as is the ability to provide leadership for the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in dealing with the Government, the media, the Museum’s stakeholders and partners, and other organizations. The candidate should also possess superior analytical skills and adhere to high ethical standards.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to Winnipeg, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance, and be prepared to travel as required across Canada and abroad.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the Corporation and its activities can be found on its Web site at http://humanrights.ca.

For more information, please contact Michelle Richard or Kathy Rahme at 613-742-3204 or at krahme@boyden.com. To apply for this position, please visit the Boyden Global Executive Search Web site at http://www.boyden.ca.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Schedules I, II and III

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 14(3) and 14.1(3) of the Bank Act, that Schedules I, II and III, as amended, were as shown below as at December 31, 2014.

SCHEDULE I
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2014

Name of Bank Head Office
B2B Bank Ontario
Bank of Montreal Quebec
Bank of Nova Scotia (The) Nova Scotia
Bridgewater Bank Alberta
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Ontario
Canadian Tire Bank Ontario
Canadian Western Bank Alberta
CFF Bank Alberta
Citizens Bank of Canada British Columbia
Continental Bank of Canada Ontario
CS Alterna Bank Ontario
DirectCash Bank Alberta
Equitable Bank Ontario
First Nations Bank of Canada Saskatchewan
General Bank of Canada Alberta
Hollis Canadian Bank Ontario
HomEquity Bank Ontario
Laurentian Bank of Canada Quebec
Manulife Bank of Canada Ontario
National Bank of Canada Quebec
Pacific & Western Bank of Canada Ontario
President’s Choice Bank Ontario
RedBrick Bank Ontario
Rogers Bank Ontario
Royal Bank of Canada Quebec
Tangerine Bank Ontario
Toronto-Dominion Bank (The) Ontario
Zag Bank Alberta

SCHEDULE II
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2014

Name of Bank Head Office
Amex Bank of Canada Ontario
Bank of America Canada Ontario
Bank of China (Canada) Ontario
Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (Canada) Ontario
Bank One Canada Ontario
BNP Paribas (Canada) Quebec
BofA Canada Bank Ontario
Citco Bank Canada Ontario
Citibank Canada Ontario
CTBC Bank Corp. (Canada) British Columbia
Habib Canadian Bank Ontario
HSBC Bank Canada British Columbia
ICICI Bank Canada Ontario
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Canada) Ontario
J.P. Morgan Bank Canada Ontario
J.P. Morgan Canada Ontario
Korea Exchange Bank of Canada Ontario
Mega International Commercial Bank (Canada) Ontario
Shinhan Bank Canada Ontario
Société Générale (Canada) Quebec
State Bank of India (Canada) Ontario
Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation of Canada Ontario
UBS Bank (Canada) Ontario
Walmart Canada Bank Ontario

SCHEDULE III
(Section 14.1)

As at December 31, 2014

Name of Authorized Foreign Bank (FB) Name under which FB is permitted to carry on business in Canada Type of Foreign Bank Branch (FBB) (see reference *) Principal Office
Bank of America, National Association Bank of America, National Association Full-service Ontario
Bank of New York Mellon (The) Bank of New York Mellon (The) Full-service Ontario
Barclays Bank PLC Barclays Bank PLC, Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
BNP Paribas BNP Paribas Full-service Quebec
Capital One Bank (USA), N.A. Capital One Bank (Canada Branch) Full-service Ontario
China Construction Bank China Construction Bank Toronto Branch Full-service Ontario
Citibank, N.A. Citibank, N.A. Full-service Ontario
Comerica Bank Comerica Bank Full-service Ontario
Coöperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A. Rabobank Nederland Full-service Ontario
Credit Suisse AG Credit Suisse AG, Toronto Branch Lending Ontario
Deutsche Bank AG Deutsche Bank AG Full-service Ontario
Fifth Third Bank Fifth Third Bank Full-service Ontario
First Commercial Bank First Commercial Bank Full-service British Columbia
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Full-service Ontario
M&T Bank M&T Bank Full-service Ontario
Maple Bank GmbH Maple Bank Full-service Ontario
Merrill Lynch International Bank Limited Merrill Lynch International Bank Limited Lending Ontario
Mizuho Bank, Ltd. Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
Northern Trust Company (The) Northern Trust Company, Canada Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
PNC Bank, National Association PNC Bank Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
Royal Bank of Scotland N.V. (The) Royal Bank of Scotland N.V., (Canada) Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
Royal Bank of Scotland plc (The) Royal Bank of Scotland plc, Canada Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
Société Générale Société Générale (Canada Branch) Full-service Quebec
State Street Bank and Trust Company State Street Full-service Ontario
U.S. Bank National Association U.S. Bank National Association Full-service Ontario
UBS AG UBS AG Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
MUFG Union Bank, National Association Union Bank, Canada Branch Lending Alberta
United Overseas Bank Limited United Overseas Bank Limited Full-service British Columbia
Wells Fargo Bank, National Association Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch Full-service Ontario
  • Reference *
    An FBB, whose order is subject to the restrictions and requirements referred to in subsection 524(2) of the Bank Act, is referred to as a "lending" branch.

March 2, 2015

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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  • Footnote 1
    The policy on the use of Significant New Activity provisions is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=5CA18D66-1.
  • Footnote 2
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 3
    The New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) are available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247.
  • Footnote 4
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 5
    A comprehensive listing of substances that are subject to SNAc provisions is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=0F76206A-1.
  • Footnote 6
    The Substances Management Advisory Note, Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/ subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=CC526AE6-1.
  • Footnote 7
    The Substances Management Information Line can be contacted at substances@ec.gc.ca (email), 1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada), 819-938-3232 (outside of Canada).