ARCHIVED — Vol. 149, No. 23 — June 6, 2015

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 18020

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2- propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of paragraph 64(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 100 kg per calendar year in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, or in any natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity;
    • (b) the information specified in item 7 of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
    • (c) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
    • (d) the identification of every government department or agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and, if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency;
    • (e) the test data and a test report from a reproduction and developmental toxicity test, conducted via the dermal route, in respect of the substance, according to one of the following:
      • (i) the methodology described in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline No. 421 entitled Reproduction/Developmental Toxicity Screening Test,
      • (ii) the methodology described in the OECD test guideline No. 414 entitled Prenatal Development Toxicity Study and the OECD test guideline No.416 entitled Two-Generation Reproduction Toxicity Study,
      • (iii) the methodology described in the OECD test guideline No. 422 entitled Combined Repeated Toxicity Study with the Reproduction/Developmental Toxicity Screening Test, or
      • (iv) any other similar methodology that will permit the assessment of the reproduction and developmental toxicity test of the substance via the dermal route of exposure; and
    • (f) all other information and test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  3. The test data and the test reports described in paragraph 2(e) must be in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (Principles of GLP) set out in Annex II of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, and where the test guidelines and the Principles of GLP are current at the time the test data are developed.
  4. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.
    • Transitional Provision
  5. Despite item 1, in relation to hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and December 31, 2015, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg during this period in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, or in any natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment to apply the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) to hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, pursuant to section 85 of that Act. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice. (see footnote 1)

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person engaging in a significant new activity in relation to hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2- propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information required in the Notice at least 90 days before using the substance for the significant new activity.

The activities with respect to hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, requiring a SNAN submission involve its use in any cosmetic or drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act or its use in a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations. These activities have not been identified as presently occurring in Canada.

Activities not subject to the Notice

This Notice does not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under any Act of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA 1999: the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. It also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates that are not isolated and are not likely released, impurities, contaminants or partially unreacted intermediates related to the preparation of a substance or, in some circumstances, to items such as wastes, mixtures or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be notifiable under the SNAc provisions. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA 1999, and section 3.2 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional details. (see footnote 2)

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance hexanedioic acid, mixed 4-methyl-2-propylhexyl and 5-methyl-2propylhexyl and 2-propylheptyl esters, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1043888-25-0, is used for a significant new activity.

Environment Canada and Health Canada will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The assessment of the substance identified potential concerns related to developmental toxicity. The Significant New Activity Notice was issued to obtain information to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before it is used in cosmetics or drugs as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, or in natural health products as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.

The Notice references elements of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) (see footnote 3) to detail some of the information requirements being imposed. Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers. (see footnote 4)

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a particular Notice applies, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they ought to have access. (see footnote 5) The phrase “to which they ought to have access” means information in any of the company’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product, are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant Safety Data Sheet (SDS).

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all substances that may be subject to SNAc provisions. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If a person involved in activities with the substance obtains any information that reasonably supports the conclusion that this substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA 1999, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. Where a person receives possession and control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note, Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 provides more detail on this subject. (see footnote 6)

Under section 86 of CEPA 1999, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc Notice shall notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Notice.

This substance is a chemical substance on the Non-domestic Substances List and as such can be manufactured or imported in a quantity of up to 1 000 kg in a calendar year without the requirement to provide information to the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(1) of the CEPA 1999.

A transitional provision was included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to a 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The Notice comes into force immediately with a threshold of 1 000 kg per calendar year to define what constitutes a significant new activity. However, on January 1, 2016, this threshold will be lowered to 100 kg per calendar year.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is available for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with this Notice or believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to contact the Substances Management Information Line. (see footnote 7) The program will work with the person to help them comply with the Notice. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent and history of compliance.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 19 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 15 of the 19 substances identified in Annex II are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on 4 of these substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on the remaining 15 pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have not identified uses above 100 kg per calendar year other than those regulated under the Pest Control Products Act administered by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the ministers propose to take no further action under section 77 of the Act on 15 of the substances.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining four substances at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment

As part of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister Health have conducted a screening assessment of 19 substances that were prioritized for assessment following categorization of the Domestic Substances List. These 19 substances are registered as active ingredients in pest control products under the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA) and have undergone an environmental and human health risk assessment for the purposes of the PCPA by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, as part of the product registration process.

Based on information collected in response to notices under section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), including Phase One and Phase Two of the Domestic Substances List Inventory Update, in addition to evaluation of other available information on substance uses, it was determined that these 19 substances have uses that are limited to pesticide applications that have been assessed under the PCPA. Given that no other uses of these 19 substances have been identified, the likelihood of exposure to these substances in Canada and potential for harm to humans or the environment resulting from non-pesticidal applications is low.

Proposed conclusion

Based on available information, it is proposed to conclude that these 19 substances do not meet any of the criteria under section 64 of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends, or that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Although a risk to the environment or human health has not been identified, the substances in this assessment are recognized to have properties of concern. There may be a concern for the environment or for human health if exposure to these substances were to increase. Options on how best to monitor changes in the use profiles of these substances are being investigated.

The draft Screening Assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

ANNEX II

Substances Identified as Not Meeting the Criteria Under Section 64 of CEPA 1999

CAS RN (see reference 1) Domestic Substances List name Common/pesticide name
51-03-6 1,3-Benzodioxole, 5-[[2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy]methyl]-6-propyl- Piperonyl butoxide
62-73-7 (see reference a) Phosphoric acid, 2,2-dichloroethenyl dimethyl ester Dichlorvos
76-06-2 Methane, trichloronitro- Chloropicrin
87-90-1 1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, 1,3,5-trichloro- Trichloro-s-triazinetrione
88-30-2 Phenol, 4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)- TFM (3-Trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol)
94-75-7 (see reference b) Acetic acid, (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)- 2,4-D (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid)
133-06-2 (see reference c) 1H-Isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione, 3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-2-[(trichloromethyl)thio]- Captan
133-07-3 1H-Isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione, 2-[(trichloromethyl)thio]- Folpet
333-41-5 Phosphorothioic acid, O,O-diethyl O-[6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4-pyrimidinyl] ester Diazinon
584-79-2 Cyclopropanecarboxylic acid, 2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-methyl-1-propenyl)-, 2-methyl-4-oxo-3-(2-propenyl)-2-cyclopenten-1-yl ester Allethrin
2921-88-2 Phosphorothioic acid, O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) ester Chlorpyrifos
8001-58-9 Creosote Creosote
8003-34-7 Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids Pyrethrins
10453-86-8 Cyclopropanecarboxylic acid, 2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-methyl-1-propenyl)-, [5-(phenylmethyl)-3-furanyl]methyl ester Resmethrin
10605-21-7 Carbamic acid, 1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-, methyl ester Carbendazim
12069-69-1 Copper, [µ-[carbonato(2-)-O:O′]]dihydroxydi- Copper carbonate, basic
13356-08-6 Distannoxane, hexakis(2-methyl-2-phenylpropyl)- Fenbutatin-oxide
20543-04-8 Octanoic acid, copper salt Copper Octanoate
23564-05-8 (see reference d) Carbamic acid, [1,2phenylenebis(iminocarbonothioyl)]bis-, dimethyl ester Thiophanate-methyl
  • Reference 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Reference a
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Reference b
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Reference c
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Reference d
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

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DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

BANK ACT

ADR Chambers Banking Ombuds Office — Approval of an external complaints body

Pursuant to subsection 455.01(1) of the Bank Act, I have approved ADR Chambers Banking Ombuds Office, and, in French, ADR Chambers – Bureau de l’Ombudsman des services bancaires, for the purposes of section 455.01 of that Act, and that approval takes effect 60 days after the day of this publication.

JOE OLIVER
Minister of Finance

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DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

BANK ACT

CIT Financial (Alberta) ULC and CIT Group Inc. and its affiliates — Order deeming entities not to be entities associated with a foreign bank

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to section 3 of the Entity Associated with a Foreign Bank Regulations, of an order deeming CIT Financial (Alberta) ULC not to be an entity associated with a foreign bank for the purposes of paragraphs 510(1)(a) and 510(1)(b) of the Bank Act. The order also deems CIT Group Inc. and its affiliates (CIT Group Inc. and affiliates, collectively “the CIT Affiliates”) not to be entities associated with a foreign bank for the purposes of paragraph 510(1)(d) of the Bank Act, provided that with respect to each of the CIT Affiliates, the order only applies in relation to its control of, or substantial investment in, CIT Financial (Alberta) ULC. The order was effective as of April 1, 2015.

JOE OLIVER
Minister of Finance

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DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

BANK ACT

Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments — Approval of an external complaints body

Pursuant to subsection 455.01(1) of the Bank Act, I have approved the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments, and, in French, Ombudsman des services bancaires et d’investissement, for the purposes of section 455.01 of that Act, and that approval takes effect 60 days after the day of this publication.

JOE OLIVER
Minister of Finance

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DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT

STATE IMMUNITY ACT

Order Accepting the Recommendation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs Concerning the Two-year Review of the List of State Supporters of Terrorism

Whereas, on September 7, 2012, pursuant to subsection 6.1(2) of the State Immunity Act, the Governor in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, after consulting with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, established a list of foreign state supporters of terrorism as a Schedule to the Order Establishing a List of Foreign State Supporters of Terrorism (SOR/2012-170);

Whereas, on September 7, 2014, two years had elapsed since the establishment of the list and pursuant to subsection 6.1(7) of the State Immunity Act, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has reviewed the list in consultation with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, and has determined that there are still reasonable grounds to believe that the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Syrian Arab Republic should remain on the list and that no other foreign state should be listed at this time;

And whereas, on May 7, 2015, His Excellency the Governor General in Council accepted the recommendation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs made pursuant to subsection 6.1(7) of the State Immunity Act,

Therefore, notice is given that the review has been completed and that the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Syrian Arab Republic will remain listed as foreign state supporters of terrorism in the Schedule to the Order Establishing a List of Foreign State Supporters of Terrorism made pursuant to subsection 6.1(2) of the State Immunity Act.

May 26, 2015

THE HONOURABLE ROBERT NICHOLSON
Minister of Foreign Affairs

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-003-15 — Release of new issue of RSS-247

Notice is hereby given by Industry Canada that the following document came into force upon its publication on the Industry Canada Web site:

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-247, Issue 1, Digital Transmission Systems (DTSs), Frequency Hopping Systems (FHSs) and Licence-Exempt Local Area Network (LE-LAN) Devices.

The above-mentioned document was published to outline certification requirements for licence-exempt radio apparatus operating in the bands 902-928 MHz, 2400-2483.5 MHz and 5725-5850 MHz that employ frequency hopping, digital modulation and/or a combination (hybrid) of both techniques. RSS-247 also includes licence-exempt local area network (LE-LAN) devices operating in the bands 5150-5250 MHz, 5250-5350 MHz, 5470-5725 MHz and 5725-5850 MHz.

General information

The development of RSS-247 was coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC).

The Radio Equipment Technical Standards lists will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca). Comments received will be taken into consideration in the preparation of the next issue of this RSS.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

May 28, 2015

DANIEL DUGUAY
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-004-15 — Release of new issue of RSS-119

Notice is hereby given by Industry Canada that the following document came into force upon its publication on the Industry Canada Web site:

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-119, Issue 12, Land Mobile and Fixed Equipment Operating in the Frequency Range 27.41- 960 MHz, which sets out the certification requirements for equipment used for the land mobile and fixed services operating in frequency bands within the range 27.41-960 MHz.
General information

The review of RSS-119 was coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC).

The Radio Equipment Standards lists will be amended to reflect the above-mentioned changes.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca). Comments received will be taken into consideration in the preparation of the next issue of this RSS.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

May 28, 2015

DANIEL DUGUAY
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Chairperson (part-time position)

The Canadian Museum of History, formerly the Canadian Museum of Civilization, is a federal Crown corporation established by amendments to the Museums Act that received royal assent on December 12, 2013. These amendments changed both the name and the mandate of the Canadian Museum of Civilization, which had been established in the Museums Act of 1990. The Museums Act of 1990 also established the Canadian War Museum as an affiliate of the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

The mandate of the Museum is to enhance Canadians’ knowledge, understanding and appreciation of events, experiences, people and objects that reflect and have shaped Canada’s history and identity, and also to enhance their awareness of world history and cultures. The corporation is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

The Canadian Museum of History is governed by a board of trustees composed of a chairperson, a vice-chairperson and nine other trustees. The Board has the overall stewardship of the corporation and is expected to provide strategic guidance to management and to oversee the activities of the corporation. It has a duty to act in the best interests of the corporation and to exercise care and due diligence. The Chairperson is responsible for the proper conduct of the Board meetings in such a way that the corporation carries out its mandate and objectives effectively, ensures good value for public funds, remains viable and holds management accountable for its performance.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. Experience on a board of directors/trustees, preferably as a chairperson, is desired, as is experience at the senior executive level within the private or public sector. The ideal candidate would possess experience in the development of strategies, objectives, plans, and best business practices and in corporate governance. Experience in dealing with the federal government, preferably with senior government officials, and experience in fundraising activities and revenue generation would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate and activities of the Canadian Museum of History. Knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the Chairperson, the Board, and the Director/Chief Executive Officer is also desired. The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of sound governance principles, strategic planning, and the monitoring and evaluation of performance in addition to being financially literate, with knowledge of the federal government’s expectations regarding accountability and reporting. Knowledge of the federal government’s cultural policy agenda and how it relates to the Canadian Museum of History and knowledge of the cultural, heritage and/or recreational tourism sectors would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would possess superior leadership and management skills to enable the Board to accomplish its work effectively and with a national perspective. He or she would be able to lead strategic discussions, foster debate among Board members, facilitate consensus and manage conflicts, should they arise. The ability to anticipate emerging issues and develop strategies to enable the Board to seize opportunities and solve problems is sought, as is the ability to develop and maintain effective relationships with the corporation’s senior management, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, her office, the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, and the corporation’s key stakeholders and partners. Superior communications skills, both written and oral, and the ability to manage communications with a variety of stakeholders and the media are also desired.

The ideal candidate would be a strategic and innovative leader, and would possess sound judgment and integrity. He or she would also possess high ethical standards, superior interpersonal skills, tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

A person is not eligible to be appointed as Chairperson of the Board if that person is not a Canadian citizen.

The Board meets a minimum of four times per year: twice in Gatineau, once by teleconference and once in another Canadian city. The Board may meet several additional times per year by teleconference. The average annual time commitment is approximately 20 days.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.historymuseum.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by June 22, 2015, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

OFFICE OF THE PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF CANADA

Assistant Privacy Commissioner (full-time position)

Salary range: From $172,900 to $203,300
Location: National Capital Region

The mission of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) is to protect and promote the privacy rights of individuals. The Office oversees compliance with both the Privacy Act, which covers the personal information-handling practices of federal government departments and agencies, and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), Canada’s private sector privacy law, along with some aspects of Canada’s anti-spam law.

In this context, the Assistant Privacy Commissioner (APC) provides leadership and direction to three branches and one division within the OPC and is accountable for investigating privacy complaints under the terms of the two federal privacy laws. The APC’s other responsibilities include conducting audits to assess organizations’ compliance under each of the Acts referenced above, analyzing and providing recommendations on privacy impact assessments, responding to formal requests pursuant to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, and providing a range of public and stakeholder outreach activities in support of the OPC’s mandate.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would possess executive level management experience in a private or public sector organization, including the management of human and financial resources, as well as decision-making experience with respect to complex and sensitive issues, preferably in areas related to privacy (data protection, security, cyberspace, technology, etc.). The ideal candidate would also possess experience in the development and/or implementation of policies, performance standards and operational procedures in addition to experience in the interpretation and application of legislation, regulations and directives. Experience in developing, maintaining and managing successful stakeholder relationships and complex partnerships is also desired.

The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the mandate, roles and responsibilities of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and of the legislative and regulatory framework within which the Privacy Commissioner carries out his mandate, in particular the Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). He or she would possess knowledge of the principles of natural justice and knowledge of the operations of the federal government, including those related to sound management principles, strategic reporting, accountability and transparency. Knowledge of the global nature of privacy and data protection and of the relationships between current and emerging technologies and privacy issues is also desired. Knowledge of privacy regimes in other jurisdictions (provincial, territorial, national and international) would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to provide leadership within the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and to provide quality advice, support and recommendations to the Privacy Commissioner in carrying out his mandate. He or she would have the ability to think strategically, anticipate trends and act to influence the policy development process as well as the ability to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies, and analyze complex situations in order to make equitable decisions and recommendations, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences. The ideal candidate would also possess superior communication skills, both written and oral, and the ability the develop and maintain effective relationships with a broad range of stakeholders that include senior government officials, private sector organizations, industry and professional associations, academia, and privacy protection agencies in Canada and internationally.

The ideal candidate will demonstrate sound judgment, integrity, tact, discretion and impartiality, adhere to strong professional ethics and possess superior interpersonal skills. He or she would also be an objective and diplomatic leader.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance. He or she must also be willing to travel within Canada and abroad as required.

As provided in the Privacy Act, the Assistant Privacy Commissioner shall engage exclusively in such duties or functions of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner under this Act or any other Act of Parliament as are delegated by the Privacy Commissioner to that Assistant Privacy Commissioner and shall not hold any other office under Her Majesty for reward or engage in any other employment for reward.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at https://www.priv.gc.ca/index_e.asp.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by June 22, 2015, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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  • Footnote 1
    The Policy on the Use of Significant New Activity Provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=5CA18D66-1.
  • Footnote 2
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers is available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 3
    The New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247/.
  • Footnote 4
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers is available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 5
    A comprehensive listing of substances that are subject to SNAc provisions is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=0F76206A-1.
  • Footnote 6
    The Substances Management Advisory Note, Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=CC526AE6-1.
  • Footnote 7
    The Substances Management Information Line can be contacted at substances@ec.gc.ca (email), 1-800-567-1999 (toll free in Canada), 819-938-3232 (outside of Canada).