ARCHIVED — Vol. 149, No. 29 — July 18, 2015

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2015-66-03-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 66(2) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), makes the annexed Order 2015-66-03-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, June 25, 2015

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2015-66-03-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENTS

1. Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

4431-83-8 117698-12-1 1437281-01-0
6798-77-2 147159-48-6 1467707-87-4
6975-24-2 172343-37-2 1472005-85-8
9001-86-9 173244-50-3 1472005-88-1
9001-89-2 174155-46-5 1472010-43-7
9025-57-4 174155-47-6 1476777-83-9
9032-73-9 207308-30-3 1481647-97-5
14352-61-5 917104-27-9 1481694-12-5
21662-10-2 944730-39-6 1491116-15-4
29118-25-0 1003300-72-8 1536326-17-6
37172-56-8 1079802-37-1 1536329-74-4
42797-18-2 1174918-46-7 1542710-29-1
50327-95-2 1254557-84-0 1584160-40-6
69709-01-9 1255685-69-8 1591785-71-5
76735-64-3 1262661-88-0 1591789-87-5
78433-08-6 1359994-45-8 1609655-83-5
80498-15-3 1404190-37-9 1615198-22-5
84632-59-7 1417164-49-8 1615198-25-8
88402-77-1 1421663-75-3 1627515-87-0
93857-00-2 1429493-82-2 1628019-14-6
105683-99-6 1437280-85-7 1637294-01-9

2. Part II of the List is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

18757-1 Resin acids and rosin acids, heteromonocyclic derivatives, esters with alkylpolyols
  Acides résiniques et acides colophaniques, dérivés hétéromonocycliques, esters avec des alcanepolyols
18782-8 4,11-Triphenodioxazinedisulfonic acid, 3,10-bis[(2-aminoalkyl)amino]-6,13-dichloro-, reaction products with 4-[(2-chloroethyl)sulfony]butanoyl chloride, sodium salts
  Acide 3,10-bis[(2-aminoalkyl)amino]-6,13-dichlorotriphénodioxazine-4,11-disulfonique, produits de la réaction avec le chlorure de 4-[(2-chloroéthyl)sulfony]butanoyle, sels de sodium
18783-0 2,7-Naphthalenedisubstituted, 4-amino-6-[[5-[(4-amino-6-chloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]-2-sulfophenyl]azo]-3-[(2,5-disulfophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt
  4-Amino-6-[[5-[(4-amino-6-chloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]-2-sulfophényl]azo]-3-[(2,5-disulfophényl)azo]-5-hydroxynaphtalène substitué en 2 et 7, sel de lithium et de sodium
18787-4 Propanoic acid, 2,2-dialkyl-, potassium salt
  2,2-Dialkylpropanoate de potassium
18792-0 Alkyloxy-hydroxypropyl, trialkylamine, ammonium chloride
  Chlorure d’alcoxy(hydroxypropyl)trialkylaminium
18812-2 Carbopolycycle-bis(diazonium), dihalo, chloride (1:2), reaction products with metal chloride, calcium carbonate, N-(2,4-dialkylphenyl)-oxoalkanamide, potassium 4-[dioxoalkylamino) substituted benzene (1:1) and sodium hydroxide
  Dichlorure de dihalogéno-[carbopolycycle]-bis(diazonium), produits de la réaction avec un chlorure de métal, du carbonate de calcium, du N-(2,4-dialkylphényl)-oxoalcanamide, du 4 [dioxoalkylamino]benzène substitué de potassium (1/1) et de l’hydroxyde de sodium
18823-4 1-Propene, 2-alkyl-, homopolymer, hydrolysis products with phosphorus sulfide (P255), calcium salts
  2-Alkylprop-1-ène homopolymérisé, produits de l’hydrolyse avec du sulfure de phosphore (P255), sels de calcium
18825-6 L-Lysine, N2,N6-bis[4-carboxy-1-oxo-2(or 4)-[(1-oxoalkyl)amino]butyl]-, sodium salt (1:?)
  N2,N6-Bis[4-carboxy-1-oxo-2(ou 4)-[(1-oxoalkyl)amino]butyl]-L-lysine, sel de sodium (1/?)
18832-4 Aluminum metal oxide (Al14metal4O25), dysprosium- and europium- doped
  Oxyde d’aluminium et d’un autre métal (Al14métal4O25), dopé au dysprosium et à l’europium
18833-5 Benzamide, N-dialkylaminoalkyl-dialkylalkylphenyl-tetrahydrodioxopyrrolopyrrolyl
  N-(Dialkylamino)alkyl-(dialkylalkyl)phényl-tétrahydrodioxopyrrolopyrrolyl-benzamide

COMING INTO FORCE

3. This Order comes into force on the day on which it is published in the Canada Gazette.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of selenium and its compounds including those specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on selenium and its compounds, pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas 25 of the 29 substances identified in the table in the annex and addressed in the draft Screening Assessment of selenium and its compounds are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that selenium and its compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that selenium and its compounds be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for selenium and its compounds to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-3231 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment
VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment
AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Selenium and its Compounds

Pursuant to section 68 or section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of selenium and its compounds under the Selenium-containing Substance Grouping of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) Substance Groupings Initiative. Twenty-five substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for action because they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999, and an additional four were included because a moiety-based assessment approach was taken.

Selenium-containing substances on the Domestic Substances List
CAS RN(see note 1) Domestic Substances List name
1306-24-7(see note a) Cadmium selenide (CdSe)
3425-46-5 Selenocyanic acid, potassium salt
5819-01-2(see note b) Dodecane, 1,1′-selenobis-
7446-08-4(see note c) Selenium oxide (SeO2)
7446-34-6(see note d) Selenium sulphide
7488-56-4(see note e) Selenium sulfide (SeS2)
7782-49-2 Selenium
7783-00-8(see note f) Selenious acid
7783-07-5 Hydrogen selenide (H2Se)
7791-23-3(see note g) Seleninyl chloride
10102-18-8(see note h) Selenious acid, disodium salt
10214-40-1(see note i) Selenious acid, copper(2+) salt (1:1)
12002-86-7(see note j) Silver selenide (AgSe)
12069-00-0(see note k) Lead selenide (PbSe)
12137-76-7(see note l) Palladium selenide (PdSe)
12214-12-9(see note m) Cadmium selenide sulfide (Cd2SeS)
12626-36-7(see note n) Cadmium selenide sulfide (Cd(Se,S))
12656-57-4(see note o) C.I. Pigment Orange 20
13410-01-0(see note p) Selenic acid, disodium salt
20405-64-5(see note q) Copper selenide (Cu2Se)
21559-14-8(see note r) Selenium, bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S)bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-
56093-45-9(see note s) Selenium sulfide
58339-34-7(see note t) C.I. Pigment Red 108
67711-98-2(see note u) Slags, dore furnace
69029-73-8(see note v) Leach residues, tellurium
121053-28-9(see note w) Electrolytes, cobalt-manufg.
129618-35-5(see note x) Electrolytes, copper-manufg.
144507-49-3 Slimes and Sludges, sulfuric acid manuf., sulfur dioxide cooling tower, selenium-contg.
152923-45-0(see note y) Slimes and Sludges, mercury conc. roasting off gas condensate
  • Note 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Note a
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note b
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note c
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note d
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note e
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note f
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note g
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note h
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note i
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note j
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note k
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note l
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note m
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note n
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note o
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note p
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note q
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note r
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note s
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note t
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note u
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note v
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note w
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note x
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999
  • Note y
    This substance met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999

This Screening Assessment focuses on the selenium moiety; therefore, it includes substances containing selenium in all oxidation states (selenite, selenate, elemental, selenide), organic selenium, and all forms of selenium found in the environment. The selenium assessment encompasses all 29 selenium-containing substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), including those that meet categorization criteria. All selenium compounds that have the potential to transform, dissolve, dissociate and/or degrade to release selenium through various transformation pathways can potentially contribute to the exposure of humans and other organisms to bioavailable forms of selenium. The assessment also considers exposure to relatively insoluble selenium-containing substances, because they can also be taken up by organisms through their diet. This assessment considers the combined exposure to the selenium moiety, from natural or anthropogenic sources, whether it is present in environmental media (e.g. water, sediment, soil and air), food or products. Selenium is an essential nutrient for human health; however, there are potential human health risks to certain subpopulations that have or are likely to have elevated selenium exposure levels. This assessment evaluates the potential for harm from elevated selenium exposure rather than deficiency or essentiality.

Natural sources of selenium include volcanic activity, sea salt spray, wildfires, weathering of selenium-rich soils and rocks, and volatilization from water bodies. Anthropogenic sources are also significant and include selenium production (e.g. mining); the manufacture, import and uses of selenium-containing substances, products and manufactured items; and the incidental production and subsequent release of selenium as a result of activities such as fossil fuel combustion, mining, base metal refining operations, agricultural activities, and waste management. Once released to the environment, selenium may enter the air, water, and soil compartments, with selenium eventually migrating to sediments and biota.

Selenium is an essential micronutrient taken up by aquatic and soil- and sediment-dwelling organisms, through diet and direct contact with the environment. Selenium bioavailability varies widely with environmental conditions, especially in aquatic ecosystems. Selenium is known to be a bioaccumulative element, and its effect on aquatic organisms can be related to their internal body concentrations. Tissue residues in fish, the most sensitive class of aquatic organisms, are used to characterize the exposures that may lead to harm in aquatic ecosystems.

The most severe effect resulting from long-term exposure to elevated concentrations of selenium in the food web is reproductive failure in egg-laying vertebrates (fish, waterbirds and amphibians). In fish, excess selenium may accumulate in fish eggs and affect developing embryos and larvae, while adults appear to be less affected. Lower egg hatchability and deformities in offspring are the main toxicity endpoints in birds and other oviparous species, although evidence is sparse for reptiles and amphibians. Field studies conducted in Canada and other regions of North America have demonstrated the hazards and reproductive effects of selenium on birds and fish when the substance is present at sufficiently high concentrations in the food web, as well as its potential impacts on fish populations and biodiversity, all of which affect the integrity of various ecosystems.

Ecological exposure to selenium resulting from incidental releases was characterized for the following sectors based on their potential to release selenium as a by-product: metal mining, base metal smelting and refining, iron and steel production, electricity (power generation) co-located with coal mining, coal mining, oil sands extraction and processing, and pulp and paper mills. Scenarios for exposure to selenium from agricultural run-off, the waste management of selenium-containing substances, products or manufactured items, and selenium in the effluent of wastewater treatment systems were also developed.

Risk quotient analyses were performed by comparing selenium exposure concentrations to the predicted no-effects concentrations (PNECs) in fish eggs/ovaries, fish whole-body, benthic organisms, and soil organisms. Based on these analyses, selenium may cause harm to aquatic, benthic and soil organisms in the vicinity of some facilities, for a number of sectors; coal and metal mining, base metal smelting and refining, electricity generation (coal-fired power plants) co-located with coal mining, intensive agricultural areas, and publicly owned wastewater treatment systems are of potential concern.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft Screening Assessment, there is risk of harm to organisms and biodiversity, but not to the broader integrity of the environment, from selenium and its compounds. It is proposed to conclude that selenium and its compounds meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA 1999, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that selenium and its compounds do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Selenium is an essential nutrient for human health and performs important functions in the body, including thyroid hormone metabolism, redox reactions and immune functions. When incorporated into proteins such as glutathione peroxidase, it is one of the most important antioxidants in the body. All Canadians are exposed to selenium through their diet, and intake levels in Canadians are considered adequate to meet nutritional requirements. Exposure to selenium was characterized using the measurement of total selenium concentrations in the whole blood of Canadians; total selenium whole-blood concentrations are a measure of integrated exposure of all forms of selenium from all routes and sources, including environmental media, food and products. Cereals (breads, baked goods, cereals, grains and flours) are the main sources of selenium intake for the general population, and traditional foods (such as marine mammals) can be the main sources of intake for many Inuit in northern Canada who consume these food items. Some Inuit who eat traditional foods have been identified as a subpopulation with elevated exposure. Subsistence fishers consuming fish with elevated selenium concentrations (e.g. around mining operations) and individuals consuming multi-vitamin/mineral supplements containing 400 µg of selenium are two additional subpopulations in Canada with the potential for elevated selenium exposure.

Although selenium is essential for human health, there are potential human health risks to certain subpopulations that have or are likely to have elevated selenium exposure levels. For this reason, guidance values exist to protect against insufficient and excessive exposures. Selenosis, or chronic selenium toxicity, was considered to be the critical health effect for selenium, characterized by hair loss, brittle nails, garlic odour in breath, weakness, decreased cognitive function and gastrointestinal disorders. Selenosis is the basis for many international regulatory reference values, including the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for North American populations. Selenium whole-blood concentrations found in some subpopulations of Canadians exceed this UL and exceed concentrations at which selenosis has been observed in humans.

Based on the information presented in this draft Screening Assessment, it is proposed to conclude that selenium and its compounds meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that selenium and its compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment as well as the risk management scope document for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-003-15 — Licensing Framework for Residual Spectrum Licences in the 700 MHz and AWS-3 Bands

The intent of this notice is to announce the release of the document entitled Licensing Framework for Residual Spectrum Licences in the 700 MHz and AWS-3 Bands (hereinafter referred to as the Framework). The Framework sets out the Department’s decisions with respect to policy, technical and licensing issues concerning spectrum licences that remained unassigned from the previous licensing processes for Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) and Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) in the 700 MHz and AWS-3 bands.

Through the release of the Framework, Industry Canada hereby announces the decisions resulting from the consultation process undertaken in Canada Gazette notice SLPB-002-15, Consultation on a Licensing Framework for Residual Spectrum Licences in the 700 MHz and AWS-3 Bands.

Clarification process

As done in previous auctions, Industry Canada will accept written questions soliciting clarification of the rules and policies set out in the Framework from the date of publication of the Framework up to the deadline specified in the Table of Key Dates. Written questions and Industry Canada’s responses will be made public on Industry Canada’s Web site. Every effort will be made to post the questions received, along with Industry Canada’s written responses, in the shortest time frame possible. Questions that are of a similar nature and subject matter may be grouped and summarized. Questions regarding bidding procedures will be addressed in mail-out packages intended for qualified bidders, and will not be included in this clarification process unless they are deemed to be critical information for potential bidders requiring an immediate response. These answers will be considered as clarification of the policies set out in the Framework. Applicants are encouraged to submit questions as soon as possible.

Industry Canada may also amend or supplement the auction rules and procedures contained in the Framework. Any such amendment or supplement will be published on Industry Canada’s Web site and will be sent to all qualified bidders.

Questions regarding this auction may be sent to the Senior Director, Spectrum Licensing and Auction Operations (spectrum.auctions@ic.gc.ca).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

July 9, 2015

FIONA GILFILLAN
Director General
Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-011-15 — Release of RSS-310, Issue 4

Notice is hereby given by Industry Canada that the following document will come into force 90 days after its publication on the Department’s Web site (www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum):

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-310, Issue 4, Licence-Exempt Radio Apparatus: Category II Equipment, which sets out standard requirements for licence-exempt radio apparatus used for radiocommunication (other than broadcasting) that is exempt from certification.
General information

The review of RSS-310 has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada.

The Radio Equipment Standards lists will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca). Comments received will be taken into consideration in the preparation of the next issue of this Radio Standards Specification.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

July 9, 2015

DANIEL DUGUAY
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-014-15 — Release of new issues of RSS-170 and SRSP-519

Notice is hereby given by Industry Canada that the following documents will come into force upon their publication on Industry Canada’s Web site:

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-170, Issue 3, Mobile Earth Stations (MESs) and Ancillary Terrestrial Component (ATC) Equipment Operating in the Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS) Bands, which sets out the certification requirements for equipment operating in the MSS, including mobile ATC equipment; and
  • Standard Radio System Plan SRSP-519, Issue 1, Technical Requirements for the Ancillary Terrestrial Component (ATC) of Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS) Systems Operating in the Bands 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz, which sets out the minimum technical requirements for the efficient spectrum utilization of ATC equipment operating in the bands 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz.

RSS-170 and SRSP-519 have been published to include certification and licensing requirements for Industry Canada’s recent policy on ATC equipment operating in the bands 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz, known as the AWS-4 bands.

General information

The review of RSS-170 and SRSP-519 has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada.

The Radio Equipment Standards lists will be amended to reflect the above changes.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca), for matters regarding the RSS, and to the Manager, Space Science and Mobile-Satellite Services (srsp.pnrh@ic.gc.ca), for matters regarding the SRSP. Comments received will be taken into consideration in the preparation of the next issues of the RSS and the SRSP.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

July 9, 2015

DANIEL DUGUAY
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

HOUSE OF COMMONS

Sergeant-at-Arms (full-time position)

Salary range: (TBD)
Location: National Capital Region

As an official of the House of Commons, the Sergeant-at-Arms is responsible for maintaining order inside the Chamber of the House of Commons when Members of Parliament are sitting, under the direction of the Speaker of the House of Commons.

The Sergeant-at-Arms contributes to the effective and efficient operation of the Chamber of the House of Commons by safeguarding life and property, and maintaining peace and order. The Sergeant-at-Arms assists the Clerk of the House of Commons as required, performs ceremonial functions, and works in close collaboration with the Director of the Parliamentary Protective Service and the House of Commons Corporate Security Officer to facilitate the consistent delivery of integrated security services both inside and outside the Chamber.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and experience.

The ideal candidate would possess a good understanding of the legal, historical and cultural conditions of parliamentary institutions in Canada, as well as knowledge of the Canadian parliamentary system, the legislative process and the constitutional mandate of the House of Commons. Experience working in a parliamentary or legislative environment or with legislators would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would possess significant experience in a security-related field, with a record of protecting life and property and managing teams in the context of security operations. He or she would also have strong analytical, problem-solving and decision-making abilities and the ability to respond in a strategic, innovative and reasonable manner in high-pressure situations and in the context of unexpected security events, while respecting the tradition of an open and accessible Canadian Parliament.

The ideal candidate would have leadership experience in a complex stakeholder environment, with a track record of managing organizational change and sensitive relationships. The ideal candidate would possess the ability to develop and maintain effective relations with parliamentarians, the Clerk of the House of Commons, the Director of the Parliamentary Protective Service, and other key stakeholders.

The ideal candidate would be objective, fair, impartial, and decisive as well as possess high ethical standards and integrity. He or she would be a consensus-builder with excellent interpersonal skills and sound judgment. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, are also desired.

Proficiency in both official languages is essential.

The successful candidate is frequently required to work long hours due to House and Member of Parliament business associated with regular and extended sittings and urgencies that arise.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the House of Commons and its activities can be found on the Parliament of Canada Web site at http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parlinfo/compilations/HouseOfCommons.aspx?Menu=HoC.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by July 25, 2015, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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