ARCHIVED — Vol. 150, No. 10 — March 5, 2016

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 13052

Rescission of Ministerial Conditions

(Section 84 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment had, on September 4, 2004, pursuant to subsection 84(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, imposed conditions on the manufacture or import of the substance indeno[4,5-d]-1,3-dioxin,4,4a,5,6,7,8,9,9b-octahydro-7,7,8,9,9-pentamethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Registry No. 365411-50-3, previously identified as indanedioxa;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed additional information in respect of the substance;

And whereas the ministers no longer suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment hereby rescinds the conditions on the manufacture or import of the substance indeno[4,5-d]-1,3-dioxin,4,4a,5,6,7,8,9,9b-octahydro-7,7,8,9,9-pentamethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Registry No. 365411-50-3, pursuant to subsection 84(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

THE HONOURABLE CATHERINE MCKENNA
Minister of the Environment

[10-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice with respect to the proposed Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Use of Cutback and Emulsified Asphalt

Whereas volatile organic compounds are specified on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the draft document for review and consultation entitled Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from the Use of Cutback and Emulsified Asphalt was posted on the Department of the Environment’s consultation Web site on April 14, 2014, for a period of public consultation of 60 days;

Whereas the draft Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from the Use of Cutback and Emulsified Asphalt has been amended after consideration of the comments received from the public during the consultation period starting on April 14, 2014;

Pursuant to subsection 54(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, notice is hereby given that electronic copies of this proposed Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Use of Cutback and Emulsified Asphalt, issued under subsection 54(1) of that Act, are available and may be downloaded at the following address: www.ec.gc.ca/cov-voc/default.asp?lang=En&n=05CE2B41-1.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed Code of Practice for the Reduction of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Use of Cutback and Emulsified Asphalt.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

March 5, 2016

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

[10-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Human Health Risk Assessment for Diesel Exhaust

The Minister of Health hereby gives notice of the availability of a science assessment document entitled Human Health Risk Assessment for Diesel Exhaust. This document consists of a detailed scientific risk assessment of the human health implications associated with exposure to diesel exhaust from on-road and off-road applications in Canada. Overall, this Health Canada risk assessment concludes that the currently available evidence indicates that diesel exhaust emissions are responsible for significant air quality and population health impacts in Canada.

The risk assessment report is available in both official languages upon request at the following Web site: www.healthcanada.gc.ca/air. Any person requiring further information may submit a request to the Air Health Effects Assessment Division, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Room 3-057, AL 4903c, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, AIR@hc-sc.gc.ca (email). All information requests must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, as well as the date of publication of this notice.

January 27, 2016

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

APPENDIX

Human Health Risk Assessment for Diesel Exhaust — Summary

Health Canada completed the Human Health Risk Assessment for Diesel Exhaust, a comprehensive review and analysis of the potential adverse health effects associated with diesel fuel use in Canada. The report focuses on diesel exhaust (DE) emissions from on-road and off-road vehicles (excluding rail and marine applications) and targets the impacts resulting from general population exposure. The assessment includes a review of diesel fuels, engines and emissions, a review of exposure to DE, an evaluation of the health effects associated with DE exposure, and a quantitative analysis of the population health impacts associated with the contribution of DE to criteria air contaminant concentrations in Canada. This report does not address the health risks of diesel fuel itself, which is under review as part of the Chemicals Management Plan of the Government of Canada and which will be reported on elsewhere.

Internationally, the potential health effects of DE exposure have long been recognized, and great effort has resulted in substantial reductions in diesel emissions, including in Canada. A key accomplishment has been the introduction of stringent emission regulations for new diesel vehicles and engines, resulting in improved engine and emission control technologies in both the off-road and on-road diesel fleets. In addition, the quality of diesel fuel used in on-road, off-road, rail, marine and stationary engines has improved, particularly in terms of the sulphur content. Some jurisdictions have undertaken additional initiatives to mitigate in-use diesel engine emissions and human exposure to them, such as inspection and maintenance programs, retrofit and scrappage programs and idling restrictions. However, the Canadian in-use diesel fleet is still dominated by vehicles whose engines predate the most recent emission standards.

Diesel-powered vehicles are pervasive on major roadways and in urban centres in Canada. It is reasonable to assume that most Canadians are regularly exposed to DE. Because of the variable and complex nature of DE and the fact that DE constituents are emitted by other pollution sources, it has been difficult to quantify general population exposure to DE. Several surrogates have been used to represent DE, all of which have had their limitations. The respirable fraction of elemental carbon is considered to be one of the better assessment options used to date.

This risk assessment considered the reviews and conclusions of the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) [1998] (see footnote 1) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) [2002] (see footnote 2) human health risk assessments for DE and provided detailed review of the health effects literature published since 2000. The available information supports the conclusion that DE emissions have direct effects on human health.

The newly published health studies, along with supporting evidence from work published prior to 2000, provide sufficient evidence to conclude that DE is carcinogenic in humans and is specifically associated with the development of lung cancer. Although the risk estimates are generally small, the population health risks are considered to be significant given the ubiquitous presence of DE emissions in Canada. The evidence is also suggestive that DE may be implicated in the development of cancer of the bladder in humans, but further research is required to allow definitive conclusions to be drawn. A limited number of studies have investigated other cancers in association with DE exposure, but the evidence is inadequate to draw conclusions regarding causality. Overall, these conclusions are consistent with the categorization of DE as a human carcinogen (Group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). (see footnote 3) (see footnote 4)

Regarding non-cancer health effects and the potential causal role of DE in their development, a number of conclusions are drawn from the existing literature. The evidence supports a causal relationship between acute exposure to DE at relatively high concentrations and effects on the respiratory system, including increases in airway resistance and respiratory inflammation. Under conditions of chronic exposure, DE exposure is likely to be causal in the development of respiratory effects. It was concluded that DE exposure is likely to be causal in the development of adverse cardiovascular outcomes following acute exposure and in the development of adverse immunological responses. The evidence reviewed is suggestive of a causal relationship between DE and (1) adverse cardiovascular outcomes following chronic exposure, (2) adverse reproductive and developmental effects and (3) central nervous system effects following acute exposure to DE. Currently, there is inadequate evidence to draw conclusions regarding the potential neurological impacts of chronic DE exposure.

Based on traditional risk assessment methodologies and with regard to general population exposure, a short-term exposure guidance value of 10 µg/m3 and a chronic exposure guidance value of 5 µg/m3 have been derived based on diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM) to protect against adverse effects on the respiratory system. The available evidence indicates that respiratory effects occur at lower concentrations of DE than those associated with other non-cancer adverse effects; therefore, these guidance values are considered protective against the non-cancer health impacts of DE exposure. However, it is recognized that there have not been adequate large scale epidemiological studies of non-cancer effects associated with either short-term or chronic DE exposure to conclusively characterize the exposure–response relationships. More research is needed to elucidate this and to evaluate the potential role of DE in the observed non-threshold health effects on the population of fine particulate matter (PM2.5).

In general, it has been shown that sensitive subpopulations, such as the elderly, children and asthmatics, can be at greater risk of adverse respiratory effects due to DE exposure. Exposure of the elderly and asthmatics to traffic-related DE has been shown to increase respiratory inflammation. Also, pulmonary function decrements have been demonstrated in asthmatics exposed to traffic-related DE. Furthermore, traffic-related DE exposure in children has been implicated in potential asthma development later in life. The guidance values for short-term and chronic DE exposure presented above account for the enhanced sensitivity of subgroups in the population.

Overall, it is concluded that DE is associated with significant population health impacts in Canada and efforts should continue to further reduce emissions of and human exposure to DE.

As part of this assessment, efforts were also made to quantify the population health impacts associated with the contribution of DE to criteria air contaminant concentrations in Canada. The analysis of population health impacts was conducted in a stepwise manner with the use of computer simulation tools to (1) estimate emissions from the Canadian diesel fleet, (2) estimate the impact of those emissions on ambient concentrations of criteria air contaminants across the country, and (3) estimate population health impacts resulting from the incremental contribution of DE to air pollution levels. This was undertaken for calendar year 2015, and results were assessed on a national, provincial and territorial, and regional basis. This analysis is complementary to the traditional risk assessment approach presented above.

The air quality scenarios modelled with A Unified Regional Air Quality Modelling System (AURAMS) and the Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT) were selected in order to provide an indication of the potential air quality and health impacts associated with diesel fuel use in on-road and off-road applications in Canada. On-road and off-road diesel applications are responsible for substantial levels of pollutant emissions. Compared with other mobile sources, diesel vehicles and engines contribute significantly to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and PM2.5 emissions, whereas gasoline mobile sources contribute the majority of carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Diesel source emissions are notably important in large urban areas, such as the Greater Vancouver, Toronto and Montréal areas, where a large fraction of the Canadian population resides. Diesel emissions are also important along major trucking routes and roadways connecting major cities (e.g. Windsor–Québec corridor), as well as in agricultural and mining areas (e.g. Alberta). The characteristics of the vehicle fleet and the dominating economic sectors in a particular region determine the influence of diesel emissions. The concentration of diesel emissions in specific geographic areas leads to distinct air quality impacts across Canada.

Diesel emissions are estimated to contribute significantly to ambient concentrations of NO2, PM2.5 and ground level ozone (O3). The air quality modelling results show that on-road diesel emissions contribute significantly to air pollutant concentrations in urban and economically active areas and along major transportation routes. Off-road diesel emissions, which are more widely distributed than on-road diesel emissions, affect air quality in both rural and urban areas. The combination of on-road and off-road emissions leads to greater air quality impacts in the largest Canadian urban centres, notably the Greater Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montréal areas. Off-road diesel emissions also have a relatively large impact in less developed areas characterized by few other sources of pollutant emissions (e.g. remote mining communities).

Based on the current health impact analysis, on-road and off-road diesel emissions result in significant and substantial population health impacts and societal costs in Canada via the contribution of DE to ambient concentrations of criteria air contaminants. The modelling undertaken estimates that on-road diesel emissions are associated with 320 premature mortalities for 2015 (valued at $2.3 billion), with 65% and 35% of the estimated mortalities attributable to ambient PM2.5 and NO2, respectively. On-road and off-road diesel emissions are associated with 710 premature mortalities (valued at $5.1 billion), with 65%, 32% and 3% of the estimated mortalities being attributable to ambient PM2.5, NO2 and O3, respectively. Diesel emissions are also associated with significant numbers of acute respiratory symptom days, restricted activity days, asthma symptom days, hospital admissions, emergency room visits, child acute bronchitis episodes and adult chronic bronchitis cases across Canada. Results from the AQBAT simulations for the current assessment suggest that on-road and off-road emissions each contribute approximately equally to population health impacts. The results also indicate that both on-road and off-road diesel applications have significant health impacts in major Canadian urban centres. Diesel emissions have higher health impacts in the most populated provinces, such as British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, and in the most populated census divisions, which correspond to the Greater Vancouver, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montréal areas. The greatest air quality impacts are also observed in those areas. Overall, it is concluded that efforts should continue to further reduce emissions of DE in Canada, particularly in areas with large populations.

[10-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Schedules I, II and III

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 14(3) and 14.1(3) of the Bank Act, that Schedules I, II and III, as amended, were as shown below as at December 31, 2015.

SCHEDULE I
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2015

Name of Bank Head Office
B2B Bank Ontario
Bank of Montreal Quebec
Bank of Nova Scotia (The) Nova Scotia
Bridgewater Bank Alberta
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Ontario
Canadian Tire Bank Ontario
Canadian Western Bank Alberta
CFF Bank Alberta
Citizens Bank of Canada British Columbia
Continental Bank of Canada Ontario
CS Alterna Bank Ontario
DirectCash Bank Alberta
Equitable Bank Ontario
First Nations Bank of Canada Saskatchewan
General Bank of Canada Alberta
Hollis Canadian Bank Ontario
HomEquity Bank Ontario
Laurentian Bank of Canada Quebec
Manulife Bank of Canada Ontario
National Bank of Canada Quebec
Pacific & Western Bank of Canada Ontario
President’s Choice Bank Ontario
Rogers Bank Ontario
Royal Bank of Canada Quebec
Tangerine Bank Ontario
Toronto-Dominion Bank (The) Ontario
Wealth One Bank of Canada Ontario
Zag Bank Alberta

SCHEDULE II
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2015

Name of Bank Head Office
Amex Bank of Canada Ontario
Bank of America Canada Ontario
Bank of China (Canada) Ontario
Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (Canada) Ontario
Bank One Canada Ontario
BNP Paribas (Canada) Quebec
BofA Canada Bank Ontario
Citco Bank Canada Ontario
Citibank Canada Ontario
CTBC Bank Corp. (Canada) British Columbia
Habib Canadian Bank Ontario
HSBC Bank Canada British Columbia
ICICI Bank Canada Ontario
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Canada) Ontario
J.P. Morgan Bank Canada Ontario
J.P. Morgan Canada Ontario
KEB Hana Bank Canada Ontario
Mega International Commercial Bank (Canada) Ontario
Shinhan Bank Canada Ontario
Société Générale (Canada) Quebec
State Bank of India (Canada) Ontario
Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation of Canada Ontario
UBS Bank (Canada) Ontario
Walmart Canada Bank Ontario

SCHEDULE III
(Section 14.1)

As at December 31, 2015

Name of Authorized Foreign Bank (FB) Name under which FB is permitted to carry on business in Canada Type of Foreign Bank Branch (FBB) (see note *) Principal Office
Bank of America, National Association Bank of America, National Association Full-service Ontario
Bank of New York Mellon (The) Bank of New York Mellon (The) Full-service Ontario
Barclays Bank PLC Barclays Bank PLC, Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
BNP Paribas BNP Paribas Full-service Quebec
Capital One Bank (USA), N.A. Capital One Bank (Canada Branch) Full-service Ontario
China Construction Bank China Construction Bank Toronto Branch Full-service Ontario
Citibank, N.A. Citibank, N.A. Full-service Ontario
Comerica Bank Comerica Bank Full-service Ontario
Coöperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A. Rabobank Nederland Full-service Ontario
Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank (Canada Branch) Lending Quebec
Credit Suisse AG Credit Suisse AG, Toronto Branch Lending Ontario
Deutsche Bank AG Deutsche Bank AG Full-service Ontario
Fifth Third Bank Fifth Third Bank Full-service Ontario
First Commercial Bank First Commercial Bank Full-service British Columbia
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Full-service Ontario
M&T Bank M&T Bank Full-service Ontario
Maple Bank GmbH Maple Bank Full-service Ontario
Mizuho Bank, Ltd. Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
MUFG Union Bank, National Association Union Bank, Canada Branch Lending Alberta
Natixis Natixis Canada Branch Lending Quebec
Northern Trust Company (The) Northern Trust Company, Canada Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
PNC Bank, National Association PNC Bank Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
Royal Bank of Scotland N.V. (The) Royal Bank of Scotland N.V., (Canada) Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
Royal Bank of Scotland plc (The) Royal Bank of Scotland plc, Canada Branch (The) Full-service Ontario
Société Générale Société Générale (Canada Branch) Full-service Quebec
State Street Bank and Trust Company State Street Full-service Ontario
U.S. Bank National Association U.S. Bank National Association Full-service Ontario
UBS AG UBS AG Canada Branch Full-service Ontario
United Overseas Bank Limited United Overseas Bank Limited Full-service British Columbia
Wells Fargo Bank, National Association Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch Full-service Ontario
  • Note *
    An FBB, whose order is subject to the restrictions and requirements referred to in subsection 524(2) of the Bank Act, is referred to as a "lending" branch.

February 16, 2016

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[10-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    California Environmental Protection Agency (1998). Part B: Health risk assessment for diesel exhaust. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Resources Board, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, CA. Available online at www.arb.ca.gov/regact/diesltac/partb.pdf.
  • Footnote 2
    United States Environmental Protection Agency (2002). Health assessment document for diesel engine exhaust (final 2002). EPA/600/8-90/057F. National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
  • Footnote 3
    Benbrahim-Tallaa L.; Baan R. A.; Grosse Y.; Lauby-Secretan B.; El Ghissassi F.; Bouvard V.; Guha N.; Loomis D.; and Straif K.; International Agency for Research on Cancer Monograph Working Group (2012). Carcinogenicity of diesel-engine and gasoline-engine exhausts and some nitroarenes. Lancet Oncol 13(7): 663–664.
  • Footnote 4
    IARC (2013). Diesel and gasoline engine exhausts and some nitroarenes. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, Vol. 105. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Available online at monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol105/index.php.