ARCHIVED — Vol. 150, No. 12 — March 19, 2016

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Public consultation process in preparation for the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora

Notice is hereby given that the Department of the Environment is inviting the Canadian public to provide comments on the species proposals and administrative documents for the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

CITES is the international convention that ensures the international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. Canada has been a Party to CITES since 1975. The Conference of the Parties is the primary decision-making body of CITES. Decisions made at meetings of the Conference of the Parties include amendments to the list of species regulated under CITES as well as decisions on administrative matters. The 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties of CITES (COP17) will take place from September 24, 2016, to October 5, 2016, in South Africa.

Final decisions on the proposals for amendments to Appendices I and II of CITES adopted by a Conference of the Parties of CITES are implemented domestically in Schedule I of the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations (WAPTR) pursuant to section 21 of the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (WAPPRIITA).

The Department of the Environment, as the lead department responsible for the implementation of CITES in Canada, coordinates consultations with the public in preparation for the CITES Conference of the Parties. Details of the public consultation process for COP17 are posted on the Department of the Environment Web site (http://www.ec.gc.ca/cites/default.asp?lang=En&n=46CAFD9E-1).

The Canadian public is hereby invited to submit comments on species proposals that may be submitted by Canada to COP17. Public input will help inform the content of the proposals and will help inform the decision to proceed with submission of these proposals. Information on the proposals that Canada is considering is available on the Department of the Environment Web site. Interested parties are invited to submit comments to the CITES International Team, Canadian Wildlife Service, Department of the Environment by email to ec.scientificauthority.ec@canada.ca, or by fax at 819-938-3984, no later than April 4, 2016.

The purpose of this notice is also to notify the Canadian public that there will be two opportunities to provide input on species proposals and administrative documents that have been submitted for COP17 by other CITES Parties. In early May, these documents will be available for comment, and will be accessible through the Department of the Environment Web site. Comments on the documents should be provided no later than July 31, 2016. A meeting will be held in Ottawa in June 2016 to allow the public another opportunity to provide input. The written or in-person input received will inform the official positions of Canada at COP17. Interested parties who wish to receive an invitation to the public consultation meeting can send a request to the CITES International Team, Canadian Wildlife Service, Department of the Environment, by email at ec.scientificauthority.ec@canada.ca, or by fax at 819-938-3984.

SUE MILBURN-HOPWOOD
Director General
Canadian Wildlife Service

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 18554

Ministerial Condition
(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1-butyl 2-(phenylmethyl) ester, Chemical Abstracts Service No. 1200806-67-2;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

KAREN L. DODDS
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on January 14, 2016, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

“substance” means 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1-butyl 2-(phenylmethyl) ester, Chemical Abstracts Service No. 1200806-67-2; and

“waste” means the effluents that result from rinsing containers used for transportation of the substance.

2. The notifier may import or manufacture the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier shall not use the substance to manufacture any of the following:

  • (a) a toy or a child care article as defined in section 1 of the Phthalates Regulations;
  • (b) a cosmetic or a drug as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; or
  • (c) a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations.

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to a person who will use it only in accordance with section 3.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning the manufacture of the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

  • (a) the information specified in paragraph 7(a) of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (b) the address of the manufacturing facility within Canada;
  • (c) the information specified in paragraphs 8(a) to (d), item 9 and paragraph 10(b) of Schedule 5 to the Regulations;
  • (d) a flow diagram of the manufacturing process that includes features such as process tanks, holding tanks and distillation towers;
  • (e) a description of the manufacturing process that details the reactants used, reaction stoichiometry, batch or continuous nature of the process, and the scale of the process; and
  • (f) a description of the major steps in manufacturing operations, the chemical conversions, the points of entry of all reactants, the points of release of the substance, and the procedures for cleaning equipment, including the frequency.

Disposal of the Substance

6. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must collect any waste in their physical possession or under their control and destroy or dispose of it in the following manner:

  • (a) deep well injection in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the well is located;
  • (b) incineration in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the incineration facility is located; or
  • (c) deposition in a secure landfill in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the landfill is located.

Environmental Release

7. Where any release of the substance or waste to the environment occurs, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance or waste shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release, and to limit the dispersion of any release. Furthermore, the person shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, inform the Minister of the Environment by contacting an enforcement officer designated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Record-keeping Requirements

8. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

  • (a) the use of the substance;
  • (b) the quantity of the substance that the notifier manufactures, imports, purchases, sells and uses;
  • (c) the name and address of each person to whom the notifier transfers the physical possession or control of the substance; and
  • (d) the name and address of each person in Canada who has disposed of the substance or of waste for the notifier, the method used to do so and the quantities of the substance or waste shipped to that person.

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at the notifier’s principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of a representative of that person, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other Requirements

9. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance or of waste, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance or waste, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of the representative of that person in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into Force

10. These ministerial conditions come into force on March 4, 2016.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2016-87-04-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2016-87-04-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, March 9, 2016

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2016-87-04-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 5660-53-7
  • 51447-37-1
  • 90638-16-7
  • 150409-28-2
  • 1078712-83-0

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2016-87-04-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

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DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Estimating upstream GHG emissions

This notice presents Environment and Climate Change Canada’s (ECCC) proposed methodology for estimating the upstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with major oil and gas projects undergoing federal environmental assessments. This proposed methodology will be adapted for oil and gas projects based on feedback received during the comment period.

Interested parties have a 30-day period, from the date of publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to comment on the proposed approach. Comments may be provided to Mark Cauchi, Executive Director, Oil, Gas and Alternate Energy Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-420-7410 (fax), ec.dpger-ogaed.ec@ canada.ca (email).

Methodology

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has developed a methodology to assess the upstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from projects under review. The Department intends to use this methodology to fulfill its responsibilities to conduct these assessments as announced by the Government on January 27, 2016.

Defining “upstream”

“Upstream” includes all industrial activities from the point of resource extraction to the project under review. The specific processes included as upstream activities will vary by resource and project type, but in general they include extraction, processing, handling and transportation.

As an illustrative example, a crude oil pipeline project may include the following upstream activities:

  • Extraction — crude oil and gas wells and oil sands mining and in situ facilities;
  • Processing — field processing and upgrading, if occurring;
  • Handling — product transfer at terminals; and
  • Transportation — any pipeline operation in advance of the project.

Overview of the approach

The assessment of upstream GHGs will consist of two parts: (A) a quantitative estimation of the GHG emissions released as a result of upstream production associated with the project, and (B) a discussion of the project’s potential impact on Canadian and global GHG emissions.

The quantitative GHG estimation, (A), will focus on emissions from the upstream activities exclusively linked to the project, including those associated with the production of steam or hydrogen used by upstream facilities. This will include sources such as combustion and fugitive, venting and flaring emissions. The quantitative estimate will not include estimates of indirect emissions, such as those associated with the manufacture of equipment, land-use changes, grid electricity and fuels that are produced elsewhere, unless they are otherwise not distinguishable from the upstream emissions.

When possible, the emission factors and estimates developed will be validated against estimates developed using other emission and production projections available. For example, for the upstream analysis performed for the Pacific Northwest LNG project, ECCC also estimated emissions using the B.C. Shale Scenario Tool of the Pembina Institute and the LNG Greenhouse Gas Life Cycle Analysis Report of the Government of British Columbia. Appropriate data sources will be determined on a sector-by-sector, or, where appropriate, project-by-project, basis and could include information from any number of industrial, academic or other sources.

The discussion part, (B), will assess the conditions under which the Canadian upstream emissions estimated in Part A could be expected to occur even if the project were not built. This will include an assessment of future Canadian resource production forecasts given various price scenarios, potential alternative markets and modes of transportation, their costs, and other Canadian and global market conditions. The discussion will also explore the potential impact of GHG emissions associated with the project on overall Canadian GHG emissions, and where possible, on global GHG emissions.

Data

The transparency of data is a key consideration. When available and applicable, publicly available data provided by the project proponent will be used, including details on project throughput, information on product sources, and market data. Other publicly available data and forecasts, such as ECCC’s “Canada’s Emissions Trends” publications and Canada’s Biennial Report on Climate Change and the National Energy Board’s Canada’s Energy Future, may also be used.

Part A: Methodology for estimating upstream GHG emissions

The first step is to determine the expected throughput, and distinct components, of product for the project. This will be determined using publicly available proponent information or forecasts. The components considered may include, among others, conventional light oil, in situ heavy oils, mined heavy oil, synthetic crude oil, sweet gas, or acid gas. The throughput of a component may be adjusted to reflect the parameters of a particular project. For example, diluent, which is used to dilute heavy oil to facilitate its transportation by pipeline, is sometimes recycled; in such a case, the upstream emissions associated with the production and processing of the diluent would be different from when the diluent is not recycled. Each component of the product would be distinct in the extraction, processing, handling and transportation activities it has undergone before reaching the project, and the components’ emissions factors will reflect these differences.

The second step is to determine the GHG emission factor for each component of the product. Emission factors will be determined using data in ECCC’s published emissions data and other publicly available data, as appropriate. Emissions factors are calculated by dividing the annual GHG emissions resulting from the upstream activities a component experiences (e.g. extraction, processing, handling and transportation) by the annual production of that component.

The third step is to calculate the upstream GHG emission contribution from each component of the value chain. The component’s throughput is multiplied by its emission factor to calculate the component’s upstream emission contribution.

The last step is to determine the upstream GHG emissions associated with the project. This will be done by summing the calculated GHG emissions from each component of the product.

The variability and uncertainty of distinct components of the products that are associated with the project over time will translate into variability in the upstream GHG estimates. Several scenarios, representing various component throughputs, will be developed using the steps outlined above. For this reason, the upstream GHG estimates will be provided as a range. The sources of variability contributing to this range will be discussed.

Where forecast data is available, the four steps outlined above will be taken and the results presented for each year. This will allow the emissions forecast to reflect changes to the product volume, the mix of components, or the emission factors over time.

For an oil pipeline the methodology can be summarized mathematically as follows:

Formula - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

Where

i is the distinct component of the product

n is the total number of components in the product

GHGi is the annual emission from reference source resulting from the extraction and processing of component type, i, and includes emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide

PRODi is the annual production from reference source of component type, i, expressed as throughput (barrels per day)

PRODproj,i is the throughput of component, i

f(adj)proj,i is the adjustment made to the component, i, throughput to reflect only throughput of component, i, that results in upstream GHG emission

Part B: Discussion of the impacts on Canadian and global upstream GHG emissions

The second part of the analysis discusses the conditions under which the Canadian upstream emissions estimated in Part A could be expected to occur even if the project were not built. This discussion draws on technical and economic information to assess the likely feasibility of Canadian resource production given various price scenarios, potential alternative markets and modes of transportation, their costs, and other Canadian and global market conditions.

The approach that ECCC expects to employ in the interim analyses is outlined below for illustrative purposes. Proponents may wish to supplement the assessment with additional analysis.

As a first step, ECCC plans to examine current production levels and the expected growth of resource production in Canada as well as the potential markets for future resource production growth with and without the proposed project.

The second step involves evaluating the technical and economic potential for alternative modes of transportation to be used in the absence of the proposed project. This section could include scenarios with different assumptions on the construction of other proposed projects, where applicable.

The third step considers the alternative transportation modes and markets developed in the second step, and discusses the potential implications for Canadian and global upstream GHG emissions. This step would include an analysis of the financial considerations for upstream production, and a discussion of the conditions under which the proposed project could enable upstream emissions in Canada and, where possible, outside of Canada.

As an example, when considering whether Canadian GHG emissions would increase as a result of a crude oil pipeline project, the primary factor will be the potential increase in Canadian upstream oil production that would be expected to occur if the project were not built. In considering the impacts on global upstream GHGs, the primary factor will be the difference in upstream emissions intensity between Canadian and non-Canadian crude oil sources.

March 19, 2016

MARK CAUCHI
Executive Director
Oil, Gas and Alternate Energy Division

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae) strain ATCC (see footnote 2) 11866specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas A. oryzae strain ATCC 11866 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment is considering amending the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activities provisions under subsection 106(3) thereof applies with respect to this living organism,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Aspergillus oryzae Strain ATCC 11866

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on A. oryzae strain ATCC 11866.

A. oryzae ATCC 11866 is a fungus that is a member of the Aspergillus flavus group and has characteristics in common with other species of this group, which includes A. oryzae and A. flavus.

A. oryzae occurs where it is used in food fermentation facilities, primarily in Japan and China, but it may also be found sporadically in soil or on decaying plant materials. A. oryzae is considered by some taxonomists as a group of domesticated strains of A. flavus that have lost the ability to produce aflatoxins, exhibit sparse sporulation and have floccose aerial mycelia. Although genetically almost identical to A. flavus, A. oryzae is classified as a separate species to indicate strains that are suitable for food production. There is no evidence in the scientific literature indicating that A. oryzae is a plant or animal pathogen, although a few cases of infection in animals with predisposing conditions have been reported. Under normal circumstances, it is unlikely to be a serious hazard to healthy livestock or to other organisms in the environment. Information from the scientific literature indicates that A. oryzae is unlikely to cause infection in healthy or debilitated humans.

A. flavus is generally considered to be ubiquitous in nature and is able to thrive in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats. A. flavus is a plant pathogen and is known to cause disease in maize, cottonseed, tree nuts, and oilseed crops. A. flavus has also been reported as an opportunistic animal pathogen, causing mycosis (i.e. infection) mostly in birds and mycotoxicosis (i.e. disease from ingestion of toxin-contaminated feed), which triggers a range of symptoms that can debilitate the host. A. flavus can cause sinus and eye infections in otherwise-healthy humans, and potentially fatal lung disease and systemic infections in susceptible groups (i.e. infants and the elderly, the immunocompromised and individuals with debilitating comorbidities).

Both species have been reported infrequently to cause allergic reactions in humans and animals, including hypersensitivity in susceptible individuals.

A. oryzae ATCC 11866 was originally selected for high protease production. This property makes it of possible commercial and industrial interest for fermentation, enzyme production, chemical production, as a livestock probiotic, for bioremediation, biodegradation, industrial effluent treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (particularly grease traps and sewer lines), organic waste treatment, biosorption of environmental contaminants and use as a host organism for recombinant protein and enzyme production.

The morphological characteristics of A. oryzae ATCC 11866, particularly small conidial size, which is associated with virulence, more closely resemble those of A. flavus; however, A. oryzae ATCC 11866 is not known to produce aflatoxin, and it is susceptible to the major clinical antifungals used to treat aspergillosis. These are mitigating factors in this risk assessment.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of A. oryzae ATCC 11866 with respect to human health and environmental effects associated with product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. A conclusion under CEPA on this living organism is not relevant to, nor does it preclude, assessment of products produced by or containing A. oryzae ATCC 11866 as prescribed under the purview of the Food and Drugs Act. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 Notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 Notice indicates that A. oryzae ATCC 11866 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008. Based on the information available, A. oryzae ATCC 11866 is not currently in commerce in Canada.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that A. oryzae ATCC 11866 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that A. oryzae ATCC 11866 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that A. oryzae ATCC 11866 does not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA at current levels of exposure.

Because A. oryzae ATCC 11866 is listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), its import into and manufacture in Canada is not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). Since there is a potential risk to susceptible humans with compromised immunity and in some instances to healthy individuals, there is suspicion that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to A. oryzae ATCC 11866 meeting the criteria set out in section 64(c) of CEPA. Therefore, the Government of Canada is considering amending the DSL, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 106(3) of the Act apply with respect to the living organism.

A significant new activity can include one that has not been conducted with the living organism in the past or an existing one with a different quantity or in different circumstances that could affect the exposure pattern of the living organism. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and for the Government to assess information about a living organism when a person proposes to use the living organism in a significant new activity. The provisions are used to assess the risks associated with the proposed new activity before the new activity is undertaken. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the living organism, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and, if so, whether new or additional risk management is required.

The draft Screening Assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of living organisms — Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strains ATCC (see footnote 3) 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas P. putida strains ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 are living organisms on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on these living organisms pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that these living organisms do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment is considering amending the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activities provisions under subsection 106(3) thereof applies with respect to these living organisms,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these living organisms at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment Report of P. putida Strains ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on four strains of Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) [ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800, and ATCC 700369].

P. putida strains ATCC 12633 (= type strain), ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 have characteristics in common with other strains of the same species. P. putida is a bacterium generally considered to have ubiquitous distribution in the environment and to adapt to varying conditions, and to thrive in soil, in water and in the rhizosphere of many plants. P. putida can also thrive in extreme and contaminated environments with low nutrient availability. Some members of the species P. putida are known to metabolize chemical compounds such as hydrocarbons and solvents. Furthermore, some strains can sequester and reduce heavy metals. These properties allow for potential uses of P. putida in bioremediation and biodegradation, water and waste water treatment, and cleaning and degreasing products, and in the production of enzymes and biochemicals used for industrial biocatalysis and in pharmaceuticals.

Despite its widespread presence in soil, water and rhizosphere ecosystems, Pputida has rarely been reported to cause adverse effects in aquatic or terrestrial plants or animals. Some Pputida infections have been reported in captive-bred fish, but rarely in wild fish populations. Overall, there is no evidence to suggest that P. putida has adverse ecological effects at the population level for vertebrates, invertebrates or plants. P. putida is considered a plant growth–promoting rhizobacterium, and some strains have anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties, making the species of commercial interest in agriculture and as a biocontrol agent against pest micro-organisms. Overall, there is no evidence specifically implicating the Domestic Substances List (DSL) strains of P. putida (ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800, and ATCC 700369) in adverse effects in the environment.

P. putida infrequently causes infection in healthy humans, but can act as an opportunistic pathogen in individuals predisposed to infection because of compromised immunity or debilitating disease. P. putida colonizes moist surfaces in hospitals, including medical devices and solutions, and can grow at temperatures typical of refrigerated storage. This characteristic has enabled it to proliferate in stored blood products and, in rare cases, cause sepsis in transfused patients. P. putida is resistant to some clinical antibiotics; however, a number of antibiotics are effective in treating P. putida infections. There have been no reported human infections attributed specifically to the DSL strains P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800, and ATCC 700369.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of P. putida strains ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800, and ATCC 700369 with respect to human health and environmental effects associated with product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA (section 71 notice) as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009. Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that 10 000–100 000 kg of products containing P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 were imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008 for uses including wastewater treatment and bioremediation.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369. It is proposed to conclude that P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Also, based on the information presented in the draft Screening Assessment, it is proposed to conclude that P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA, at current levels of exposure.

Because P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 and ATCC 700369 are listed on the Domestic Substances List, their import and manufacture in Canada is not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). Since there is a potential risk to susceptible humans with compromised immunity, or those exposed through contaminated medical devices or blood products, there is suspicion that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to P. putida ATCC 12633, ATCC 31483, ATCC 31800 or ATCC 700369 meeting the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA. Therefore, the Government of Canada is considering amending the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 106(3) of the Act apply with respect to the living organisms.

A significant new activity can include one that has not been conducted with the living organism in the past, or an existing one with a different quantity or in different circumstances that could affect the exposure pattern of the living organism. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person to provide, and the Government to assess, information about a living organism when a person proposes to use the living organism in a significant new activity. The provisions are used to assess the risks associated with the proposed new activity before the new activity is undertaken. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the living organism, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and, if so, whether risk management is required.

The draft Screening Assessment for these living organisms is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

CIT Group Inc. — Approval to have a financial establishment in Canada

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 522.211(1) of the Bank Act, that the Minister of Finance approved, on January 5, 2016, CIT Group Inc. to have a financial establishment in Canada.

March 3, 2016

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank — Order to commence and carry on business in Canada

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 534(1) of the Bank Act, of an order authorizing a foreign bank, Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank, to commence and carry on business in Canada under the name, in English, Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank (Canadian Branch) and, in French, Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank (Succursale du Canada), effective February 29, 2016.

March 2, 2016

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

PUBLIC SERVICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
CANADIAN FORCES SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS

Quarterly rates

In accordance with subsection 46(3) of the Public Service Superannuation Regulations, subsection 36(3) of the Canadian Forces Superannuation Regulations and subsection 30(3) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Regulations, the quarterly rates used for calculating interest for the purpose of subsection (1) of each of the corresponding sections are as follows:

As of:

  • March 31, 2015      1.2157%
  • June 30, 2015        1.1910%
  • September 30, 2015   1.1738%
  • December 31, 2015    1.1512%

SCOTT BRISON
President

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