ARCHIVED — Vol. 150, No. 51 — December 17, 2016

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to develop greenhouse gas regulations for electricity generation in Canada

Notice is hereby given that Environment and Climate Change Canada intends to amend the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations and to develop regulatory requirements for natural gas-fired electricity generation to support a transition to a cleaner electricity sector. These regulations will be developed in consultation with provinces, territories and Indigenous peoples, as well as with a range of stakeholders (e.g. environmental non-governmental organizations, industry) to ensure that relevant expertise and perspectives are considered.

For the Paris Agreement, Canada committed to a 30% reduction in overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030. A reduction in GHG emissions of over 5 megatonnes (Mt) is expected in 2030 from an accelerated coal phase-out. Air pollution reductions would also be achieved.

Background

In 2014, the electricity sector represented 78 Mt of GHG emissions or 11% of Canada’s total GHG emissions. Over 80% of Canada’s electricity is generated from non-emitting sources. Clean electricity is fundamental to the transition to a low-carbon economy and can play a role in reducing emissions in other sectors, such as transportation and the built environment, and assist in meeting Canada’s 2030 climate change targets. Significant steps have already been taken federally and provincially to reduce GHG emissions from the electricity systems and to develop renewable energy resources. Regulatory action would accelerate the phase-out of coal-fired electricity and set performance standards for natural gas generation.

Proposed approach

Environment and Climate Change Canada intends to amend the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations to phase out traditional coal-fired electricity by 2030. Amendments would require traditional coal-fired units to meet an emissions limit of 420 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) per gigawatt hour of electricity produced (t/GWh) by no later than 2030.

In addition, Environment and Climate Change Canada intends to set regulatory requirements for natural gas-fired electricity generation, including coal boilers converted to run on natural gas:

  • Emissions requirement of 420 t/GWh for new and modified large combustion engine units (>100 megawatts [MW]) and new boilers;
  • Emissions requirement of 500 t/GWh for new and modified small combustion engine units (≤100 MW); and
  • Interim emissions requirement of 550 t/GWh for modified boiler units converted from coal to natural gas, to apply for 15 years or until 2045, whichever comes first, after which time an emissions requirement of 420 t/GWh would apply.

The Government of Canada remains open to entering into equivalency arrangements under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) with jurisdictions that have enforceable measures that are equivalent or better in terms of environmental outcomes relative to the federal regulations.

Timing

Environment and Climate Change Canada will undertake consultations and analyses in 2017 on amendments to the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations and regulatory requirements for natural gas-fired electricity generation, and intends to publish proposed regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I, at the end of 2017 with final regulations to be published at the end of 2018. It is intended that amendments to the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations will come into force in 2026 and regulatory requirements for natural gas-fired electricity generation will come into force in 2020.

Next steps

Consultation will be undertaken with provinces and territories, as well as with a range of stakeholders (e.g. environmental non-governmental organizations, industry) to ensure that relevant expertise and perspectives are considered as part of the development of amendments to the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations and regulatory requirements for natural gas-fired electricity generation.

A webinar will be held in late December 2016 to commence the engagement process. This will be followed by a series of technical consultations. Environment and Climate Change Canada will also be working with Indigenous peoples.

This Notice of Intent also provides an opportunity for interested parties to submit comments. Interested parties may submit comments on the general approach set out above by mail or email before February 17, 2017.

Contact

Paola Mellow
Director
Electricity and Combustion Division
Energy and Transportation Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 11th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Fax: 819-938-4254
Email: ec.electricite-electricity.ec@canada.ca

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice with respect to asbestos

Pursuant to paragraph 71(1)(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (hereinafter referred to as the “Act”), notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment requires, for the purpose of assessing the manner in which to control the substances described in Schedule 1 to this notice, any person described in Schedule 2 to this notice who possesses or who may reasonably be expected to have access to the information required in Schedule 3 to this notice, to provide that information no later than January 18, 2017, 3 p.m., Eastern Standard Time.

Responses to this notice shall be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window at https://ec.ss.ec.gc.ca/. Inquiries concerning the notice may be directed to the Substances Management Information Line at 1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada) or 819-938-3232 (outside of Canada) [telephone], or eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

Pursuant to section 313 of the Act, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit, with the information, a written request that the information or part of it be treated as confidential.

Pursuant to subsection 71(4) of the Act, the Minister of the Environment may, on request in writing from any person to whom this notice applies, extend the time or times within which the person shall comply with this notice. The person seeking such extension shall submit, prior to the deadline, a request to the Minister of the Environment, to the attention of the Substances Management Coordinator, Chemicals Management Plan, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, or to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

Virginia Poter
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

SCHEDULE 1

Substances

CAS RN (see footnote 1)

Name of the substance

Common name

Formula

12001-28-4

Crocidolite asbestos

Crocidolite asbestos

Na2Fe2+3Fe3+2Si8O22(OH)2

12001-29-5

Chrysotile asbestos

Chrysotile asbestos

Mg3(Si2O5)(OH)4

12172-73-5

Amosite asbestos

Brown asbestos

Fe7Si8O22(OH)2

77536-66-4

Actinolite asbestos

Actinolite asbestos

Ca2(Mg,Fe)5(Si8O22)(OH)2

77536-67-5

Anthophyllite asbestos

Anthophyllite asbestos

(Mg,Fe)7Si8O22(OH)2

77536-68-6

Tremolite asbestos

Tremolite asbestos

Ca2Mg5Si8O22(OH)2

1332-21-4

Asbestos

   

SCHEDULE 2

Persons required to provide information

  • 1. This notice applies to any person who, during any calendar year from 2013 to 2015, manufactured a total quantity greater than 5 kg of one or more substances listed in Schedule 1.
  • 2. This notice applies to any person who, during any calendar year from 2013 to 2015, imported a total quantity greater than 5 kg of one or more substances listed in Schedule 1 whether alone, or at a concentration greater than 0.1% by weight (w/w%) in a mixture, product, or manufactured item.
  • 3. This notice applies to any person who, during any calendar year from 2013 to 2015, exported a total quantity greater than 5 kg of one or more substances listed in Schedule 1 whether alone, or at a concentration greater than 0.1% by weight (w/w%) in a mixture, product, or manufactured item.
  • 4. This notice applies to any person who, during any calendar year from 2013 to 2015, used a total quantity greater than 5 kg of one or more substances listed in Schedule 1 to manufacture a mixture, a product, or a manufactured item, whether the substance was used alone, or at a concentration greater than 0.1% by weight (w/w%) in a mixture, product, or manufactured item.
  • 5. This notice does not apply to a substance listed in Schedule 1 that is in transit through Canada.
  • 6. Respondents to the notice who
    • (a) manufactured, imported, exported or used a substance listed in Schedule 1 for which the criteria in Schedule 2 have been met during the 2013 and/or 2014 calendar years shall provide information described in sections 4, 7 and 8 of Schedule 3;
    • (b) manufactured a substance listed in Schedule 1 for which the criteria in Schedule 2 have been met during the 2015 calendar year shall complete sections 4, 5, 7 and 8 of Schedule 3; and
    • (c) imported, exported or used a substance listed in Schedule 1 for which the criteria in Schedule 2 have been met during the 2015 calendar year shall complete sections 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of Schedule 3.

SCHEDULE 3

Information required

  • 1. The definitions in this section apply in this notice.
    “manufactured item” An item that is formed into a specific physical shape or design during manufacture and has, for its final use, a function or functions dependent in whole or in part on its shape or design.
    “mixture” A combination of substances that does not produce a substance that is different from the substances that were combined, including prepared formulations and reaction mixtures that are fully characterized in terms of their constituent substances, hydrates, and homogenous and heterogeneous alloys.
    “product” excludes mixture and manufactured item.
  • 2. If the person subject to this notice is a company that owns more than one facility, a single response to this notice shall be submitted. The single response shall amalgamate the information from all facilities owned by the company for each applicable question in the notice.
  • 3. Any person to whom this notice applies shall provide the following information: name of the person (e.g. company name), Canadian head office address, Federal Business Number (see footnote 2) and contact name and information.
  • 4. For each substance listed in Schedule 1 that a person manufactured, imported, exported or used, whether alone, in a mixture, product, or manufactured item, during the 2013, 2014 or 2015 calendar year, for which the criteria set out in Schedule 2 have been met, the person shall provide the following information for the most recent calendar year in which the reportable activity took place:
    • (a) the year of reference;
    • (b) the CAS RN of the substance manufactured, imported, exported or used; and
    • (c) the quantity of the substance manufactured, imported, exported or used, reported in kilograms (rounded to two significant digits).
  • 5. (1) For each substance listed in Schedule 1 that a person manufactured, imported, exported or used, whether alone, in a mixture, product, or manufactured item, during the 2015 calendar year, for which the criteria set out in Schedule 2 have been met, the person shall provide the following information:
    • (a) the CAS RN of the substance manufactured, imported, exported or used;
    • (b) the consumer and commercial code(s) set out in section 9 that describe the known or anticipated final goods containing the substance;
    • (c) for each applicable consumer and commercial code, the quantity of the substance manufactured, imported, exported or used, reported in kilograms (rounded to two significant digits);
    • (d) for each applicable consumer and commercial code, the concentration or range of concentrations of the substance by weight (w/w%) in the known or anticipated final goods containing the substance; and
    • (e) for each applicable consumer and commercial code, the description and the common or generic name of the known or anticipated final goods containing the substance.
  • 5. (2) Where code C999 is provided for paragraph (1)(b), a written description of the known or anticipated final goods containing the substance must be provided.
  • 6. For each substance listed in Schedule 1 that a person imported, exported or used, whether alone, in a mixture, product, or manufactured item, during the 2015 calendar year, for which the criteria set out in Schedule 2 have been met, the person shall provide the following information:
    • (a) the CAS RN of the substance imported, exported or used; and
    • (b) the name, head office street and mailing addresses of the supplier(s) from whom they obtained the substance, whether alone or in a mixture, product or manufactured item.
  • 7. Persons to whom this notice applies shall provide the following information for the 2015 calendar year:
    • (a) the range representing the number of employees in Canada (1–4, 5–99, 100–499, 500 and over); and
    • (b) company-wide, the range representing the gross annual revenue in Canada (less than $30,000; $30,000 to $5 million; $5 million to $50 million; greater than $50 million).
  • 8. Persons to whom this notice applies shall provide the following information:
    • (a) whether the company has phased out or plans to phase out the manufacture, import, export or use of asbestos, by indicating “yes” or “no”;
    • (b) If the answer to (a) is “yes”, indicate the date or anticipated date of phase out. If the answer to (a) is “no”, explain reasoning;
    • (c) whether the company has substituted, or plans to substitute, asbestos with an alternative substance, by indicating “yes” or “no”; and
    • (d) if the answer to (c) is “yes”, indicate the name of the alternative substance.
  • 9. For the purpose of section 5, the following tables set out the consumer and commercial codes and their corresponding descriptions:

Table 1: Furnishings, cleaning, treatment, or care

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C101

Floor coverings

Substances contained in floor coverings.

C102

Foam seating and bedding

Substances contained in foam mattresses, pillows, cushions, and any seating, furniture and furnishings containing foam.

C103

Furniture and furnishings not otherwise covered in this table

Substances contained in furniture and furnishings made from metal, wood, leather, plastic or other materials.

C104

Fabric, textile and leather articles not otherwise covered in this table

Substances contained in fabric, textile, and leather products to impart colour and other desirable properties such as water, soil, stain repellence, wrinkle resistance, or flame resistance.

C105

Cleaning and furnishing care

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items that are used to remove dirt, grease, stains, and foreign matter from furniture and furnishings, or to cleanse, sanitize, bleach, scour, polish, protect, or improve the appearance of surfaces.

C106

Laundry and dishwashing

Substances contained in laundry and dishwashing products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C107

Water treatment

Substances contained in water treatment products, mixtures or manufactured items that are designed to disinfect, reduce contaminants or other undesirable constituents, and condition or improve aesthetics of water.

C108

Personal care and cosmetics

Substances contained in personal care products, mixtures or manufactured items that are used for cleansing, grooming, improving, or altering skin, hair, or teeth.

C109

Air care

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items that are used to odorize or deodorize indoor air in homes, offices, motor vehicles, and other enclosed spaces.

C110

Apparel and footwear care

Substances contained in apparel and footwear care products, mixtures or manufactured items that are applied post-market.

C160

Pet care

Substances contained in pet care products, mixtures or manufactured items that are used for cleansing, grooming, improving or altering skin, hair or teeth and intended for animal use.

Table 2: Construction, paint, electrical or metal

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C201

Adhesives and sealants

Substances contained in adhesive or sealant products or mixtures used to fasten other materials together or prevent the passage of liquid or gas.

C202

Paints and coatings

Substances contained in paints or coatings.

C203

Building or construction materials — Wood and engineered wood

Substances contained in building and construction materials made of wood and pressed or engineered wood products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C204.01

Cement pipes and sheets

Substances contained in cement pipes and sheets including board, transite, and panels.

C204.02

Drywall and joint compound

Substances contained in drywall sheets, taping compound, and drywall mud, plaster, and texture coats

C204.03

Roofing tiles and felts

Substances contained in roofing tiles and felts.

C204.04

Sheeting, siding and shingle

Substances contained in sheeting, siding, and shingles.

C204.05

Acoustic ceilings

Substances contained in acoustic ceilings and tiles.

C204.06

Thermal pipe insulation; mechanical insulation

Substances contained in materials that provide thermal and mechanical insulation.

C204.07

Fireproofing

Substances contained in materials used for rendering them resistant to fire, or incombustible.

C204.08

Building or construction materials not otherwise covered in this table

Substances contained in building and construction materials not otherwise covered in this table.

C205

Electrical and electronics

Substances contained in electrical and electronic products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C206

Metal materials not otherwise covered in this table

Substances contained in metal products, mixtures or manufactured items not otherwise covered in this table.

C207

Batteries

Substances contained in non-rechargeable and rechargeable batteries including dry and wet cell units that store energy.

Table 3: Packaging, paper, plastic or hobby

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C301

Food packaging

Substances contained in single or multi-layered packaging consisting of paper, plastic, metal, foil or other materials which have or may have direct contact with food.

C302

Paper products, mixtures or manufactured items

Substances contained in paper products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C303

Plastic and rubber materials not otherwise covered in this table

Substances contained in rubber and plastic products, mixtures or manufactured items not otherwise covered in this table.

C304

Toys, playground and sporting equipment

Substances contained in toys, playground, and sporting equipment made of wood, metal, plastic or fabric.

C305

Arts, crafts and hobby materials

Substances contained in arts, crafts, and hobby materials.

C306

Ink, toner and colourants

Substances contained in ink, toners and colourants used for writing, printing, creating an image on paper; and substances contained in other substrates, or applied to substrates to change their colour or hide images.

C307

Photographic supplies, film and photo-chemicals

Substances contained in photographic supplies, film, photo-processing substances, and photographic paper.

Table 4: Automotive, fuel, agriculture or outdoor use

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C401

Automotive care

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items used in automotive cleaning and care of exterior and interior vehicle surfaces.

C402

Lubricants and greases

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items to reduce friction, heat generation and wear between solid surfaces.

C403

Anti-freeze and de-icing

Substances added to fluids to reduce the freezing point of the mixture, or substances applied to surfaces to melt or prevent build-up of ice.

C404

Fuels and related products, mixtures or manufactured items

Substances burned to produce heat, light or power, or added to inhibit corrosion, provide lubrication, increase efficiency of use, or decrease production of undesirable by-products.

C405

Explosive materials

Substances capable of producing a sudden expansion, usually accompanied by the production of heat and large changes in pressure upon ignition.

C406

Agricultural products, mixtures or manufactured items (non-pesticidal)

Substances used to increase the productivity and quality of plants, animals or forestry crops, produced on a commercial scale.

C407

Lawn and garden care

Substances contained in lawn, garden, outdoor or potted plants, and tree care products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C461

Pest control

Substances contained in any product, mixture or manufactured item for directly or indirectly controlling, preventing, destroying, mitigating, attracting, or repelling any pest.

C462

Automotive, aircraft and transportation

Substances contained in automobiles, aircraft and other types of transportation, or used in their manufacture.

C463

Oil and natural gas extraction

Substances that are, or are contained in, any mixtures, products or manufactured items used for oil and natural gas drilling, extraction and processing.

Table 5: Items for food, health or tobacco

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C562

Food and beverage

Substances contained in food and beverage products, mixtures or manufactured items.

C563

Drugs

Substances contained in prescription and non-prescription drugs intended for humans or animals.

C564

Natural health

Substances contained in natural health products, mixtures or manufactured items intended for humans or animals.

C565

Medical devices

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items used for either the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder, or an abnormal physical state; or those used in restoring, correcting or modifying organic functions in humans or animals.

C566

Tobacco products, mixtures or manufactured items

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items composed in whole or in part of tobacco, including tobacco leaves and any extract of tobacco leaves.

Table 6: Products, mixtures or manufactured items not described by other codes

Consumer and commercial codes

Title

Description

C999

Other (specify)

Substances contained in products, mixtures or manufactured items that are not described within any other consumer and commercial code.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the notice.)

Asbestos is on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (hereinafter referred to as the “Act”). This listing covers all six types of asbestos (chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, anthophyllite, tremolite and actinolite). The six forms of asbestos have been reviewed by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer and have been declared human carcinogens.

The inclusion of a substance to the List of Toxic Substances enables the Government to take appropriate preventative measures under the Act to reduce exposure to and releases of the substance. To further support the commitment to manage asbestos in Canada, the Government is considering the development of additional regulatory measures for asbestos under the Act to further protect the health of Canadians. To ensure that future decision making is based on the best available information, this notice, published pursuant to section 71, will gather information on the manufacture, import, export and use of asbestos and products containing asbestos for the 2013 to 2015 calendar years. It will also gather socio-economic information from companies, including the size of companies involved (number of employees and revenue), the availability of alternatives to asbestos, and whether a phase-out strategy is in place or under consideration. This socio-economic information is needed to support the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement that would accompany the proposed Regulations.

Pursuant to subsection 71(3) of the Act, every person to whom this notice applies is required to comply with this notice within the time specified in the notice. The time specified in this notice is January 18, 2017, 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Any person making a written request pursuant to subsection 71(4) of the Act should include in their request the name of the party requiring an extension, the CAS RN of the substances for which the person will provide information, as well as the reason of the extension request.

Any person making a written request pursuant to section 313 of the Act should identify each part of the information that is to be considered confidential, and provide a rationale for the sensitivity of the information.

Persons not subject to this notice, who have a current or future interest in a substance set out in Schedule 1 to this notice, may identify themselves as a “stakeholder” for the substance by completing the voluntary Declaration of Stakeholder Interest using the online reporting system via Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window at https://ec.ss.ec.gc.ca/. The person may be contacted for further information regarding their interest in the substance.

Persons who do not meet the requirements to respond and have no commercial interest in the substances covered by this notice may submit a Declaration of Non-Engagement for the notice using the online reporting system via Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window at https://ec.ss.ec.gc.ca/.

The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are also inviting the submission of additional information that is deemed beneficial by interested stakeholders. Organizations that may be interested in submitting additional information in response to this invitation include those that manufacture, import, export or use this substance whether alone, in a mixture or in a product or a manufactured item.

Compliance with the Act is mandatory and specific offences are established by subsections 272(1), 272.1(1), 272.2(1), 272.4(1) and 272.5(1) of the Act. Amendments to the fine scheme of the Act came into force on June 22, 2012. Subsections 272(2), (3) and (4) and 272.1(2), (3) and (4) of the Act set the penalties for persons who commit an offence under the Act. Offences include the offence of failing to comply with an obligation arising from the Act and the offence of providing false or misleading information. Penalties for the most serious offences include minimum fines and the amount of the fine can range from a minimum of $5,000 for an individual convicted following summary proceedings to a maximum of $6,000,000 for a large corporation convicted on indictment. The fine range doubles for second or subsequent offences and individuals may also be liable to a term of imprisonment of up to three years. Offences other than those in the category of “serious offences” are punishable by fines capped at a maximum that ranges from $25,000 for an individual convicted following summary proceedings to $500,000 for a large corporation convicted on indictment. The maximum fines are double for second or subsequent offences.

The current text of the Act, including the most recent amendments, is available on the Department of Justice Canada website: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-15.31/.

The Act is enforced in accordance with the Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 available at www.ec.gc.ca/lcpe-cepa/default.asp?lang=En&n=5082BFBE-1. Suspected violations under the Act can be reported to the Enforcement Branch by email at ec.dale-enviroinfo-eed-enviroinfo.ec@canada.ca.

Responses to the notice must be provided no later than January 18, 2017, 3 p.m. EST using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window at https://ec.ss.ec.gc.ca/.

An electronic copy of this notice is available at the following website: www.chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca.

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to develop regulations respecting asbestos

Whereas the Government of Canada has indicated its commitment to move forward with a ban on asbestos in Canada;

Whereas asbestos is a substance listed in Item 6 of Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999);

Notice is hereby given that the Department of the Environment and the Department of Health are initiating the development of proposed regulations made under CEPA 1999 that would seek to prohibit all future activities respecting asbestos and asbestos-containing products, including the manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale, import and export. The proposed regulations are intended to be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in December 2017.

To inform the development of the proposed regulations, a mandatory survey notice under section 71 of CEPA 1999 will be published in December 2016. This notice will require mandatory data submission by people who manufacture, import, export and use asbestos and asbestos-containing products in Canada.

As part of an open and transparent process, the development of these regulations will include consultations with representatives of provincial and territorial governments, industry, non-governmental organizations, the public and other stakeholders. Input received during these consultations will be considered during the development of the regulations.

As a first step in the consultation process, interested parties may submit comments on the approach set out above by mail or email by January 18, 2017, to the contact provided below. Subsequently, interested parties will also be consulted in the spring of 2017, and additional information will be available on the following web page: http://www.ec.gc.ca/toxiques-toxics/Default.asp?lang=En&n=A183A275-1. Interested parties will have another opportunity to make written comments specific to the regulatory proposal during the mandatory consultation period that will follow the publication of the proposed regulations in December 2017.

Comments on the approach set out above can be sent by mail or email by January 18, 2017, to

Director
Chemical Management Division
Environment and Climate Change Canada
Place Vincent Massey
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 10th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Email: ec.amiante-asbestos.ec@canada.ca

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Background

The proposed regulations will be developed in support of the government-wide approach for the management of asbestos in Canada.

Asbestos is the common name for six naturally occurring minerals (chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, anthophyllite, tremolite and actinolite). Asbestos has been reviewed by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer and has been declared a human carcinogen. The health risks of asbestos are well established; breathing in asbestos fibres can cause cancer and other diseases, such as asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Asbestos is on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. This listing covers all six types of asbestos (chrysotile, amosite, crociliodite, anthrophyllite, tremolite and actinolite).

Historically, industry, construction and commercial sectors have used, and, in some cases, continue to use, asbestos in products such as cement and plaster, industrial furnaces and heating systems, building insulation, floor and ceiling tiles, house siding, car and truck brake pads, and vehicle transmission components, such as clutches. Statistics Canada data from 2015 indicates that Canada continues to import products containing asbestos, primarily replacement brake pads for vehicles and construction materials such as cement pipes.

Asbestos is currently managed under various federal acts and regulations. For example, the manufacture, importation, advertisement or sale of consumer products made of asbestos and certain high-risk consumer products that are composed of or contain asbestos fibres are prohibited or strictly regulated under the Asbestos Products Regulations, made under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act. The Asbestos Mines and Mills Release Regulations under CEPA 1999 were made to limit the concentration of asbestos fibres in gases emitted into the ambient air at asbestos mines or mills resulting from crushing, drying, or milling operations. Crocidolite asbestos is specified in Part 2 of the Export Control List in Schedule 3 to CEPA 1999 and its export is controlled through the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations under CEPA 1999.

The proposed regulations under CEPA 1999 would seek to further manage and control asbestos and asbestos-containing products in Canada by prohibiting the manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale, import and export of asbestos and asbestos-containing products. The proposed regulations would prohibit all activities involving asbestos occurring after the coming into force of the regulations, and therefore would not address any activities that occurred prior to the coming into force of the regulations (such as construction materials containing asbestos that already exist within buildings).

Actions in other jurisdictions

With the exception of chrysotile asbestos, all other forms of asbestos are listed under the Rotterdam Convention. The Rotterdam Convention is a global treaty that aims to protect human health and the environment by establishing a “prior informed consent” procedure for listed chemicals. Through this procedure, Parties must not export a substance to another Party that does not consent to the chemicals being imported into their country and must respect conditions imposed by the importing Party.

More than 50 countries, including those of the European Union, Japan, Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay and South Korea, have already banned asbestos, with a limited number of exemptions.

In the United States, some products containing asbestos are banned, such as corrugated paper, rollboard, commercial paper, specialty paper, and flooring felt. Some products containing asbestos that are still not banned include cement corrugated sheets, cement flat sheets, clothing, pipeline wrap, roofing felt, vinyl floor tiles, cement shingles, millboard, cement pipes, automatic transmission components, clutch facings, friction materials, disk brake pads, drum brake linings, brake blocks, gaskets, non-roofing coatings, roof coatings. Any new uses of asbestos after 1989 have been banned.

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2016-87-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2016-87-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, December 1, 2016

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2016-87-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendments

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 3) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 2628-16-2
  • 26850-24-8
  • 68604-94-4
  • 93820-57-6

2 Part II of the List is amended by deleting the following:

14996-2

Acrylic copolymer with ethenylbenzene and unsaturated aliphatic isocyanate, tert-Bu ethaneperoxoate-initiated, reaction products with amine and glycol ethers, esters, compounds with dimethylethanolamine

Acrylique copolymérisé avec l’éthénylbenzène et un isocyanate aliphatique insaturé, initié avec l’éthaneperoxoate de tert-butyle, produits de réaction avec une amine et des éthers de glycol, esters, composés avec la diméthyléthanolamine

18079-7

Amino acid, N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)-

Acide N,N-bis(carboxyméthyl)-aminé

Coming into Force

3 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2016-87-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — 1,1-ethanediol, 2,2,2-trichloro- (chloral hydrate), CAS RN (see footnote 4) 302-17-0 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas chloral hydrate is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act);

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas options will be considered for follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure to the substance,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on the substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of chloral hydrate

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 1,1-ethanediol, 2,2,2-trichloro-, hereinafter referred to as chloral hydrate. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for chloral hydrate is 302-17-0. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA.

Chloral hydrate does not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, it is primarily found in chlorinated drinking water as a disinfection by-product. It is also an active ingredient in prescription drugs used as sedatives and hypnotics, a medicinal ingredient in natural health products licensed as homeopathic medicines, and an intermediate for industrial metal plating.

The ecological risk of chloral hydrate was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard (potency) and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web-derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is then used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. Substances with low risk classification outcomes are affirmed using local-scale (i.e. in the area immediately surrounding a potential point-source of discharge) risk scenarios designed to be protective of the environment. The ERC identified chloral hydrate as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from chloral hydrate. It is proposed to conclude that chloral hydrate does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Drinking water is the primary source of exposure to chloral hydrate for the general population of Canada. Exposure to the general population through its use in the metal plating industry is not expected, as chloral hydrate is consumed in the plating process.

Chloral hydrate was previously assessed by Health Canada, and a drinking water guidance document was published that determined that the amount of chloral hydrate typically found in drinking water is well below the level at which health effects may be observed. A health-based value was derived, with an increased incidence of liver histopathology as the critical health effect.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that chloral hydrate does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that chloral hydrate does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the general population to chloral hydrate is not of concern at current levels, this substance is considered to have a health effect of concern based on its potential carcinogenicity. Therefore, there may be a concern for human health if exposures were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure and/or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substance that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substance, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed residential indoor air quality guideline for acetaldehyde

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed residential indoor air quality guideline for acetaldehyde.

The following exposure limits are proposed:

Exposure period

Concentration

Micrograms per Cubic Metre
(µg/m3)

Parts per Billion
(ppb)

Short-term (1 hour)

1 420

795

Long-term (24 hours)

280

157

The Government of Canada has previously conducted an evaluation of the human health effects associated with exposure to acetaldehyde with a literature cut-off date of February 1998 (Environment Canada and Health Canada, 2000). This current assessment provides an update on the health effects of acetaldehyde, based on scientific information published since the previous report. As a result of the updated health risk information, and taking into account any comments submitted during the 60-day public comment period, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada will consider if further action is required (e.g. updating the Priority Substances List assessment report or the Risk Management Strategy).

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed guideline. All written comments are to be made publicly available to all interested parties. All comments, requests for copies of the full science assessment, and information requests must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-957-1876 (telephone), 613-948-8482 (fax), air@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

November 9, 2016

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Residential indoor air quality guideline: acetaldehyde

Background

Acetaldehyde is a colourless, flammable liquid with a pungent and irritating odour, is volatile at ambient temperature and pressure, and is found in both indoor and outdoor air. In Environment Canada and Health Canada’s 2000 Priority Substance List Assessment Report: Acetaldehyde, it was concluded that acetaldehyde is toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) because it may be a genotoxic carcinogen; however, there was considerable uncertainty as to the actual cancer risk. Since the publication of the report, a number of key studies have been published, including those related to the mode of action for acetaldehyde carcinogenesis. Therefore, in order to address the uncertainty in regard to the mode of action of acetaldehyde carcinogenesis, and to more accurately determine the risk to health from levels commonly found in Canadian homes, taking into account recently published scientific data, this substance was given high priority for a full health risk assessment and development of a Residential Indoor Air Quality Guideline (RIAQG) for acetaldehyde.

The present document reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and exposure research on acetaldehyde, as well as the conclusions from a number of comprehensive reviews from internationally recognized health and environmental organizations. The document places an emphasis on research published since the most recent comprehensive review, and proposes new short- and long-term indoor air exposure limits. This RIAQG for acetaldehyde is intended to provide recommended exposure limits that would minimize risks to human health and support the development of actions to limit acetaldehyde emissions. This document also shows that, when compared to the newly proposed guidelines, levels in Canadian houses do not present a health risk.

Sources and exposure

Acetaldehyde is found ubiquitously throughout the ambient environment. Natural outdoor sources include higher plant respiration processes and emissions from forest fires. Combustion represents a major anthropogenic source of acetaldehyde, through incomplete combustion of organic material and fuels in motor vehicles. Emissions from industrial production, storage, transport, or disposal of products with residual acetaldehyde can also contribute to ambient concentrations. Secondary formation of acetaldehyde can occur through the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the atmosphere.

There are numerous sources of acetaldehyde emissions in the indoor environment, often resulting in higher levels compared to outdoors. Incomplete combustion in fireplaces, wood-burning stoves and environmental tobacco smoke, along with certain cooking processes (notably those that use cooking oil) can emit significant quantities of acetaldehyde indoors. Emissions from products for interior finishes, such as vinyl flooring and carpets, and wood-based building materials, such as fibreboard and particleboard, as well as paints, stains, adhesives, caulking and foam sealants, may also contribute to indoor levels of acetaldehyde. An additional source of acetaldehyde indoors is from the infiltration of vehicle exhaust fumes into the home from an attached garage.

Some consumer products may directly contribute to indoor acetaldehyde levels, such as fragranced consumer products (e.g. air fresheners, liquid fabric softeners, and dryer sheets, which may contain acetaldehyde), as well as indirectly via secondary formation of acetaldehyde from indoor reactions of ozone with other organic aerosols. Elevated indoor acetaldehyde levels have been shown to be associated with higher occupant density, likely due to “occupant activities” including, but not limited to, respiration releasing endogenously produced acetaldehyde.

Median acetaldehyde levels from Health Canada exposure studies measured in four cities (Edmonton, Halifax, Regina and Windsor) during winter and summer from 2005 to 2010 ranged from 10.5 to 48.7 µg/m3 (indoors) and from 2.4 to 7.2 µg/m3 (outdoors) [Health Canada 2010a, 2010b, 2012, 2013]. In one study (Windsor), personal exposure measurements were also collected, with a median range of 18.6 to 39.3 µg/m3. In these studies, the ratio of indoor to outdoor acetaldehyde concentrations was in general consistently above 2.5, which is indicative of a predominance of indoor sources of acetaldehyde.

Health effects

The health effects of exposure to acetaldehyde have been examined in toxicological and controlled human exposure studies, with very little epidemiological evidence related to indoor acetaldehyde exposure. In this assessment, the short-term exposure limit is derived from the results of a controlled human exposure study, whereas the long-term exposure limit is based on toxicological data from a study in a rodent model. Supporting evidence is provided by the results of other toxicological and controlled human exposure studies.

Based on the evidence from human and toxicological studies, the effects of short-term and long-term acetaldehyde inhalation are observed at the site of entry. Key health effects include tissue damage and cancer development, mainly in the upper respiratory tract.

Human studies

From the studies with human participants, acute exposure induced eye irritation and potentiated the bronchoconstriction response to methacholine challenge at acetaldehyde concentrations as low as 22 mg/m3, with nose and throat irritation reported at 50–200 ppm (89–357 mg/m3) [Myou et al. 1994b; Silverman, Schulte and First 1946]. At higher concentrations (350–1 000 mg/m3), aerosolized acetaldehyde was shown to directly cause bronchoconstriction in people with asthma (Myou et al. 1993; 1994b; 1994c; 1995; Fujimura et al. 1997; Prieto et al. 2000; 2002a; 2002b), and a bronchoconstrictive effect was induced in people with allergic rhinitis (2 240 mg/m3) [Prieto et al. 2002b]. Epidemiological data on the long-term effects in humans is limited to a single cross-sectional study of school children (Flamant-Hulin et al. 2010) demonstrating a significant association between acetaldehyde exposure (measured in classrooms) and increased pulmonary inflammation for non-asthmatic children, but not for asthmatic children.

Toxicological studies

In laboratory animals, acute acetaldehyde exposure induced irritation and bronchoconstriction responses. For sensory irritation, the lowest concentration that elicited a 50% decrease in respiratory rate was 2 845 ppm (5 080 mg/m3) for a 10-minute exposure in mice (Steinhagen and Barrow 1984), while exposure at ≥ 25 ppm (45 mg/m3) acetaldehyde in rats increased vasodilation in the upper respiratory tract (Stanek et al. 2001).

Long-term inhalation exposure to acetaldehyde in animal studies caused a number of non-neoplastic effects primarily in the upper respiratory tract, specifically inflammation and tissue injury (degeneration, hyperplasia, and metaplasia). In rat studies, long-term acetaldehyde exposure caused adverse effects in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia of the nasal cavity, with lesions noted at exposure concentrations as low as 268 mg/m3, and tissue injury sometimes reported in the larynx, pharynx, and trachea, typically at higher exposure levels (Woutersen et al. 1984; 1986; Saldiva et al. 1985; Appelman et al. 1986; Woutersen and Feron 1987; Cassee et al. 1996b; Cassee, Groten and Feron 1996; Oyama et al. 2007; Dorman et al. 2008; Feron, Kruysse and Woutersen 1982; Woutersen et al. 1984; 1986). In hamster studies, tracheal and laryngeal tissues were more sensitive than the nasal cavity was, although effects were observed at higher concentrations than in the rat studies (Kruysse, Feron and Til 1975; Feron 1979; Feron, Kruysse and Woutersen 1982), indicating a species-related difference. In a small number of animal studies, other adverse effects, namely reduced pulmonary bactericidal activity (Aranyi et al. 1986), increased airway hyperresponsiveness (Kawano et al. 2012), neurological effects (Ortiz, Griffiths and Littleton 1974; Shiohara et al. 1985), and altered gonad weight (Kruysse, Feron and Til 1975), were noted. Growth retardation and mortality were observed at the highest exposure levels (4 464–8 929 mg/m3) [Kruysse, Feron and Til 1975; Feron 1979; Feron, Kruysse and Woutersen 1982].

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized acetaldehyde as a class 2B carcinogen (possibly carcinogenic to humans) [IARC 1999]. Acetaldehyde has been shown to be genotoxic and mutagenic, inducing DNA damage in the form of DNA adducts, DNA–DNA crosslinks, DNA–protein crosslinks as well as more complex adducts (reviewed in Albertini 2013), and mutagenicity in in vitro test systems (Environment Canada and Health Canada 2000), as well as in an in vivo inhalation study in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) knockout mice (Kunugita et al. 2008). Chronic inhalational exposure has caused carcinogenic effects in rats and hamsters, at concentrations that induce tissue changes in the upper respiratory tract, with similar specific-related differences in concentrations consistent with the non-neoplastic effects. In rats, chronic exposure resulted in concentration-dependent increase in adenocarcinoma of the olfactory epithelium and squamous cell carcinoma of the respiratory epithelium, occurring at the lowest exposure level (1 339 mg/m3) [Woutersen et al. 1986]. In hamsters, chronic exposure at ≥2 946 mg/m3 acetaldehyde resulted in a significant increase in tumour incidence of the larynx (Feron 1979; Feron, Kruysse and Woutersen 1982).

Susceptible subpopulations

Studies of short-term exposures in human volunteers provide evidence that asthmatics are a sensitive subgroup to inhaled acetaldehyde (Myou et al. 1993; Prieto et al. 2000; 2002b). An ALDH2 polymorphism (ALDH2-2, the non-functional variant, prevalent in 40% to 50% of the Asian population, which greatly alters the rate of acetaldehyde metabolism following alcohol consumption) may confer additional susceptibility to acetaldehyde exposure. Although an increased severity of formaldehyde-induced effects has been demonstrated in studies using ALDH2 knockout mice (as compared to wild-type mice) [Isse et al. 2005; Oyama et al. 2007; 2010], no significant difference in hyperresponsiveness was observed in human studies following inhaled aerosolized acetaldehyde (Teeguarden et al. 2008).

Mode of action for carcinogenesis

The weight of evidence points to a non-linear (or threshold) mode of action (MOA) for acetaldehyde carcinogenesis. The pattern of genotoxicity and mutagenicity is consistent with a cytotoxic (secondary to a proliferative response), rather than a mutagenic (critical early event), MOA for carcinogenicity. Tumour development is proposed to be related to the occurrence of tissue damage and is dependent on saturation of capacity for acetaldehyde metabolism, enhanced cellular proliferation and mutation in the nasal cavity.

There is evidence that the toxic effects of acetaldehyde may be due, in part, to an overwhelming of the acetaldehyde detoxification capacity at the site of exposure. Evidence indicates that acetaldehyde toxicity is associated with decreased ALDH activity, and is most predominant in ALDH knockout mouse models. In addition, decreased upper respiratory tract uptake of acetaldehyde at elevated concentrations appears to be related to ALDH activity. Following saturation of the metabolic capacity for acetaldehyde, the carcinogenicity of acetaldehyde is proposed to be dependent on the induction of cytotoxicity, leading to increased cell turnover from recurrent tissue damage and repair. While no studies examining the association between acetaldehyde inhalation and cell proliferation in the upper respiratory tract were identified, enhanced cell proliferation of the tongue, epiglottis and forestomach (i.e. tissues related to route of entry) was observed in a rat study following administration in drinking water (Homann et al. 1997). In addition, acetaldehyde has been shown to induce DNA damage in the form of DNA adducts, DNA–DNA crosslinks, DNA–protein crosslinks as well as more complex adducts. These types of damage, under certain conditions including at high exposure concentrations and in association with tissue damage, lead to mutation.

The pattern of key events leading to tumour development resembles that observed for formaldehyde, which is also proposed in the literature to act via a non-linear MOA for carcinogenesis. There is a high degree of similarity in formaldehyde and acetaldehyde carcinogenesis, including similarities in the structure and toxicity of the two compounds, the critical key events including DNA–protein crosslink formation, the development of nasal carcinomas in animals at highly irritating and damaging concentrations, and limited evidence of genotoxicity in vivo.

Residential indoor air quality guideline for acetaldehyde

The determination of a RIAQG is carried out in two stages. First, a reference concentration (RfC) is derived by applying uncertainty factors to the concentrations at which the most sensitive adverse health endpoint was observed. The RfC approach is used for the determination of a guideline to reduce potential health impacts such as those observed in key toxicological, controlled human exposure, and indoor epidemiological studies.

For the short-term exposure RfC, the exposure period is specified; in the present case, one hour. For the long-term exposure RfC, the exposure is considered to occur over months or years, up to a lifetime.

In the second stage, the short- and long-term exposure RfCs are compared with measured exposures in residential indoor air, and evaluated with respect to their technical feasibility. If the RfC is considered attainable where reasonable control measures are followed, the RIAQG is set equal to the RfC. If the RfC is considered unattainable with currently available risk management technology and practices, the RIAQG may be set at a higher concentration. Setting the RIAQG at a higher concentration than the RfC results in a smaller margin of exposure between the RIAQG and the concentration at which effects have been observed in health studies. Nonetheless, a RIAQG derived in this manner does provide a measure of health protection, while remaining an achievable target for improving indoor air quality when evaluating risk management measures.

Short-term residential indoor air quality guideline

For short-term exposure to acetaldehyde, a study investigating bronchoconstriction response in human volunteers identified that the provocative concentration required to produce a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1) geometric mean for asthmatic subjects was 527 mg/m3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 142–1 149 mg/m3) acetaldehyde following a two-minute exposure (Prieto et al. 2000). The lower 95% confidence level of 142 mg/m3 was chosen as the point of departure and uncertainty factors (UFs) of 10 to account for the use of a lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL) and 10 to account for additional sensitivity in the human population (e.g. more severe asthmatics, children, ALDH polymorphisms) were applied. Thus, the short-term RfC is 1 420 µg/m3. The Health Canada residential indoor air exposure studies provide 24-hour integrated samples of acetaldehyde measurements, which do not represent acute or peak exposure. It is evident from these 24-hour measurements that the short-term reference exposure level is significantly higher than the median range of indoor air concentrations. Therefore, as this exposure limit is achievable in Canadian homes, the proposed short-term RIAQG for acetaldehyde is 1 420 µg/m3.

It is recommended that the short-term exposure limit be compared to a one-hour air sample.

Long-term residential indoor air quality guideline

For chronic exposure, the most sensitive neoplastic endpoint was adenocarcinoma in the nasal cavity of male rats, with the most sensitive non-neoplastic endpoint being degeneration of the olfactory epithelium in rats. As discussed above, a strong body of evidence has also emerged to support the notion that acetaldehyde exerts its carcinogenic effect through a non-linear MOA, with the non-neoplastic effects being precursors to a carcinogenic response. Therefore, derivation of an RfC for the neoplastic effects of acetaldehyde is based on the observation of the non-neoplastic effects. A no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 89 mg/m3 is selected, based on degeneration of the olfactory epithelium in rats (Dorman et al. 2008). Using an upper respiratory tract physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetaldehyde inhalation, the human equivalent concentration (HEC) calculated is 120 mg/m3. This value is adjusted for continuous exposure, resulting in an adjusted HEC of 21 mg/m3. UFs of 2.5 to account for toxicodynamic differences between animals and humans, 10 for additional sensitivity in the human population, and 3 for uncertainty in the shape of the lower region of the concentration–response curve were applied, resulting in a total UF of 75. Thus, the long-term RfC is 280 µg/m3. The range of median indoor air acetaldehyde concentrations measured in Canadian homes from the Health Canada residential indoor air exposure studies for a 24-hour averaging period was 10.5 to 48.7 µg/m3, with the 95th percentile ranging from 35.6 to 149.5 µg/m3. This indicates that the concentration of acetaldehyde in Canadian homes would not exceed the RfC of 280 µg/m3. Therefore, the proposed long-term RIAQG for acetaldehyde is 280 µg/m3.

When comparing a measured acetaldehyde concentration with the long-term exposure limit, the sampling time should be at least 24 hours.

Residential maximum exposure limit for acetaldehyde

Exposure period

Concentration

Critical effects

µg/m3

ppb

Short-term (1 hour)

1 420

795

Increased airway responsiveness in asthmatics

Long-term (24 hours)

280

157

Olfactory epithelial degeneration in the nasal cavity of rats

Levels in a typical Canadian home are likely well below both the short-term and long-term exposure limits and, accordingly, are unlikely to pose a health risk.

Strategies for reducing exposure to acetaldehyde include controlling indoor emissions from combustion appliances and smoking. Control measures include the following:

  • Do not smoke inside the home.
  • Properly install and maintain combustion appliances used for heating (e.g. gas and oil furnaces, wood stoves, gas water heaters), with venting outside.
  • Use a higher fan setting when cooking on a gas stove, ensure that it vents outside, and preferentially use the back burners.
  • When using and applying consumer products such as paints, adhesives, coatings and lubricants, inks, nail polish remover, and fragrances in the home, ensure the area is well ventilated and follow all label recommendations. These products should be kept well sealed and/or in non-occupied areas of the home not connected to the ventilation system, where possible.
  • Prevent leaks from an attached garage to the house and make sure that there is an appropriate seal between the home and the garage, particularly for any door that connects the two.
  • When performing home renovations, including the installation of carpeting or vinyl flooring and painting in the home, the area should be well ventilated and the user should follow all label recommendations.

Use of these strategies will help to reduce exposure to acetaldehyde and other indoor air contaminants, particularly contaminants in combustion gases and consumer products, including other VOCs.

References

Albertini, R.J. (2013) Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) genotoxicity profile: Relevance for carcinogenicity. Critical reviews in toxicology, 43(8), 671–706.

Appelman, L.M., Woutersen, R.A., Feron, V.J., Hooftman, R.N. and Notten, W.R. (1986) Effect of variable versus fixed exposure levels on the toxicity of acetaldehyde in rats. Journal of Applied Toxicology, 6(5), 331–336.

Aranyi, C., O’Shea, W.J., Graham, J. and Miller, F.J. (1986) The effects of inhalation of organic chemical air contaminants on murine lung host defenses. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, 6(4), 713–720.

Cassee, F.R., Arts, J.H.E., Groten, J.P. and Feron, V.J. (1996a) Sensory irritation to mixtures of formaldehyde, acrolein, and acetaldehyde in rats. Archives of Toxicology, 70(6), 329–337.

Cassee, F.R., Groten, J.P. and Feron, V.J. (1996b) Changes in the nasal epithelium of rats exposed by inhalation to mixtures of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, 29(2), 208–218.

Dorman, D.C., Struve, M.F., Wong, B.A., Gross, E.A., Parkinson, C., Willson, G.A., Tan, Y.M., Campbell, J.L., Teeguarden, J.G., Clewell III, H.J. and Andersen, M.E. (2008) Derivation of an inhalation reference concentration based upon olfactory neuronal loss in male rats following subchronic acetaldehyde inhalation. Inhalation toxicology, 20(3), 245–256.

Environment Canada and Health Canada. (2000) Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Priority Substance List Assessment Report: Acetaldehyde. Minister of Public Works and Government Services, Ottawa, Canada.

Feron, V.J. (1979) Effects of exposure to acetaldehyde in syrian hamsters simultaneously treated with benzo(a)pyrene or diethylnitrosamine. Progress in experimental tumor research, 24(1), 162–176.

Feron, V.J., Kruysse, A. and Woutersen, R.A. (1982) Respiratory tract tumours in hamsters exposed to acetaldehyde vapour alone or simultaneously to benzo(a)pyrene or diethylnitrosamine. European Journal of Cancer and Clinical Oncology, 18(1), 13–31.

Flamant-Hulin, M., Caillaud, D., Sacco, P., Penard-Morand, C. and Annesi-Maesano, I. (2010) Air pollution and increased levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in children with no history of airway damage. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues, 73(4), 272–283.

Fujimura, M., Myou, S., Kamio, Y., Ishiura, Y., Iwasa, K., Hashimoto, T. and Matsuda, T. (1999) Increased airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde in asthmatic subjects with alcohol-induced bronchoconstriction. European Respiratory Journal, 14(1), 19–22.

Health Canada. (2013) Edmonton Indoor Air Quality Study (2010): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary. Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Cat.: H144-15/2013E-PDF.

Health Canada. (2012) Halifax Indoor Air Quality Study (2009): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary. Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Cat.: H129-19/2012E-PDF.

Health Canada. (2010a) Regina Indoor Air Quality Study (2007): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling. Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Cat.: H128-1/10-617E-PDF.

Health Canada. (2010b) Windsor Exposure Assessment Study (2005–2006): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling. Health Canada, Ottawa, Cat.: H128-1/10-618E-PDF.

Homann, N., Kärkkäinen, P., Koivisto, T., Nosova, T., Jokelainen, K. and Salaspuro, M. (1997) Effects of acetaldehyde on cell regeneration and differentiation of the upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 89(22), 1692–1697.

IARC. (1999) Re-Evaluation of Some Organic Chemicals, Hydrazine and Hydrogen Peroxide. Summary of Data Reported and Evaluation. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Vol. 71, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.

Isse, T., Oyama, T., Matsuno, K., Ogawa, M., Narai-Suzuki, R., Yamaguchi, T., Murakami, T., Kinaga, T., Uchiyama, I. and Kawamoto, T. (2005) Paired acute inhalation test reveals that acetaldehyde toxicity is higher in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 knockout mice than in wild-type mice. Journal of Toxicological Sciences, 30(4), 329–337.

Kawano, T., Matsuse, H., Fukahori, S., Tsuchida, T., Nishino, T., Fukushima, C. and Kohno, S. (2012) Acetaldehyde at a low concentration synergistically exacerbates allergic airway inflammation as an endocrine-disrupting chemical and as a volatile organic compound. Respiration, 84(2), 135–141.

Kruysse, A., Feron, V.J. and Til, H.P. (1975) Repeated exposure to acetaldehyde vapor. Studies in Syrian golden hamsters. Archives of Environmental Health, 30(9), 449–452.

Kunugita, N., Isse, T., Oyama, T., Kitagawa, K., Ogawa, M., Yamaguchi, T., Kinaga, T. and Kawamoto, T. (2008) Increased frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and T-cell receptor mutation in Aldh2 knockout mice exposed to acetaldehyde. Journal of Toxicological Sciences, 33(1), 31–36.

Myou, S., Fujimura, M., Kamio, Y., Bando, T., Nakatsumi, Y. and Matsuda, T. (1995) Repeated inhalation challenge with exogenous and endogenous histamine released by acetaldehyde inhalation in asthmatic patients. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 152(2), 456–460.

Myou, S., Fujimura, M., Nishi, K., Matsuda, M., Ohka, T. and Matsuda, T. (1994b) Potentiating effect of inhaled acetaldehyde on bronchial responsiveness to methacholine in asthmatic subjects. Thorax, 49(7), 644–648.

Myou, S., Fujimura, M., Nishi, K., Ohka, T. and Matsuda, T. (1994c) Inhibitory effect of a selective thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, OKY-046, on acetaldehyde-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients. Chest, 106(5), 1414–1418.

Myou, S., Fujimura, M., Nishi, K., Ohka, T. and Matsuda, T. (1993) Aerosolized acetaldehyde induces histamine-mediated bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. American Review of Respiratory Disease, 148(4), 940–943.

Ortiz, A., Griffiths, P.J. and Littleton, J.M. (1974) A comparison of the effects of chronic administration of ethanol and acetaldehyde to mice: Evidence for a role of acetaldehyde in ethanol dependence. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 26(4), 249–260.

Oyama, T., Isse, T., Ogawa, M., Muto, M., Uchiyama, I. and Kawamoto, T. (2007) Susceptibility to inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in Aldh2 knockout mice. Frontiers in Bioscience, 12(5), 1927–1934.

Oyama, T., Nagayoshi, H., Matsuda, T., Oka, M., Isse, T., Yu, H.S., Pham, T.T.P., Tanaka, M., Kagawa, N., Kaneko, K. and Kawamoto, T. (2010) Effects of acetaldehyde inhalation in mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase deficient mice (Aldh2-/-). Frontiers in Bioscience, Elite, 2 E(4), 1344–1354.

Prieto, L., Gutiérrez, V., Cervera, A. and Liñana, J. (2002a) Airway obstruction induced by inhaled acetaldehyde in asthma: Repeatability and relationship to adenosine 5′-monophosphate responsiveness. Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology, 12(2), 91–98.

Prieto, L., Sánchez-Toril, F., Brotons, B., Soriano, S., Casan, R. and Belenguer, J.L. (2000) Airway responsiveness to acetaldehyde in patients with asthma: Relationship to methacholine responsiveness and peak expiratory flow variation. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 30(1), 71–78.

Prieto, L., Sánchez-Toril, F., Gutiérrez, V. and Marín, M.J. (2002b) Airway responsiveness to inhaled acetaldehyde in subjects with allergic rhinitis: Relationship to methacholine responsiveness. Respiration, 69(2), 129–135.

Saldiva, P.H., do Rio Caldeira, M.P., Massad, E., Calheiros, D.F., Cardoso, L.M., Böhm, G.M. and Saldiva, C.D. (1985) Effects of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde inhalation on rat pulmonary mechanics. Journal of Applied Toxicology, 5(5), 288–292.

Shiohara, E., Tsukada, M., Chiba, S., Yamazaki, H., Nishiguchi, K., Miyamoto, R. and Nakanishi, S. (1985) Effect of chronic administration of acetaldehyde by inhalation on (Na+ + K+)-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity of rat brain membranes. Toxicology, 34(4), 277–284.

Silverman, L., Schulte, H.F. and First, M.W. (1946) Further studies on sensory response to certain industrial solvent vapors. Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, 28(6), 262–266.

Steinhagen, W.H. and Barrow, C.S. (1984) Sensory irritation structure-activity study of inhaled aldehydes in B6C3F1 and Swiss-Webster mice. Toxicology and applied pharmacology, 72(3), 495–503.

Teeguarden, J.G., Bogdanffy, M.S., Covington, T.R., Tan, C. and Jarabek, A.M. (2008) A PBPK model for evaluating the impact of aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms on comparative rat and human nasal tissue acetaldehyde dosimetry. Inhalation toxicology, 20(4), 375–390.

Woutersen, R.A., Appelman, L.M., Feron, V.J. and Van Der Heijden, C.A. (1984) Inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in rats. II. Carcinogenicity study: Interim results after 15 months. Toxicology, 31(2), 123–133.

Woutersen, R.A., Appelman, L.M., Van GarderenHoetmer, A. and Feron, V.J. (1986) Inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in rats. III. Carcinogenicity study. Toxicology, 41(2), 213–231.

Woutersen, R.A. and Feron, V.J. (1987) Inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in rats. IV. Progression and regression of nasal lesions after discontinuation of exposure. Toxicology, 47(3), 295–305.

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Decisions, undertakings and orders on claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA), the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the decisions of the screening officer respecting each claim for exemption and the relevant material safety data sheet (MSDS) and (where applicable) the label listed below.

In accordance with section 20 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, a claimant or any affected party, as defined, may appeal a decision or order of a screening officer. An affected party may also appeal an undertaking in respect of which a notice has been published in the Canada Gazette. To initiate the appeal process, a Statement of Appeal (Form 1) as prescribed by the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act Appeal Board Procedures Regulations must be completed and delivered, along with the fee prescribed by section 12 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations, within 45 days of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the Chief Appeals Officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Julie Calendino
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988.

Transitional provisions allow compliance with either WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time. All claims for exemption in this publication were filed and evaluated in accordance with the provisions of WHMIS 1988.

There were no written representations from affected parties with respect to any of the claims for exemption and related MSDSs or labels mentioned below.

Each of the claims for exemption listed in the table below was found to be valid except for those for Registry Number (RN) 9674, which was found to be partially valid. The screening officer reached this decision after reviewing the information in support of the claim, having regard exclusively to the criteria found in section 3 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations.

Claimant

Product Identifier

RN

Date of Decision

The Lubrizol Corporation

Anglamol® 6043P

9665

21/09/2016

The Lubrizol Corporation

Lubrizol® 8219H

9667

20/09/2016

The Lubrizol Corporation

Anglamol® 9001N

9674

09/09/2016

Trican Well Service Ltd.

TXP-40

9701

09/09/2016

Quadra Chemicals Ltd.

JEFFTREAT® MS-350

9722

28/09/2016

Innospec Fuel Specialties

DCI-80

9783

25/10/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

GasFlo G2

9789

31/10/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

LIFESPAN™ 3500 HEAVY OIL STABILIZER

9809

31/10/2016

Ingevity Corporation

Enva Mul™ 2157

9832

27/10/2016

Atotech Canada Ltd.

EXPT ZINNI AL 454-1

9837

31/10/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

FAW-30

9842

31/10/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

TRETOLITE™ RBW987 REVERSE BREAKER

9843

29/09/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

EXCALIBUR™ 7760 ADDITIVE

9866

27/09/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

RE33018RBW WATER CLARIFIER

9869

14/10/2016

Innospec Fuel Specialties LLC

DCI 6A

9886

27/10/2016

Innospec Fuel Specialties LLC

Stadis® 425

9887

27/10/2016

Univar Canada Ltd.

BASEMUL

9889

28/09/2016

Univar Canada Ltd.

VANFROTH 350

9890

28/09/2016

Univar Canada Ltd.

VANFROTH 820

9891

06/10/2016

Univar Canada Ltd.

VANFROTH 702

9892

06/10/2016

Cytec Industries Inc.

HT® 424 Thixotropic Paste, Part B

9970

21/09/2016

Baker Hughes Canada Company

SCW777 SCALE INHIBITOR

9987

27/10/2016

Cytec Industries Inc.

AERO® XD-5002 Promoter

10018

27/10/2016

Having regard for the various data readily available in the literature and any information provided by the claimant, the screening officer found that only the respective MSDSs in respect of the claims bearing RNs 9665, 9722, 9832, 9843, 9866, 9869, 9886, 9887, 9889, 9890, 9891, 9892, 9970, 9987 and 10018 complied with the requirements of the relevant legislation.

In all cases where the MSDS or the label was determined not to be in compliance with the relevant legislation, pursuant to subsection 16.1(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the claimant was given 30 days to provide the screening officer with a signed undertaking accompanied by the MSDS or the label amended as necessary.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER WAS SATISFIED THAT THE CLAIMANT HAD TAKEN THE MEASURES SET OUT IN THE UNDERTAKING

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(b) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that has been disclosed on the relevant MSDS or label in compliance with an undertaking and the date on which the notice referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act was issued.

RN: 9667 Date: 2016-10-31

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LD50 (rat, oral) value of 3 287 mg/kg for the ingredient “xylene”.
  2. Disclose an LC50 (rat, inhalation, vapour, 4 hours) value of 29 mg/L for the ingredient “xylene”.

RN: 9783 Date: 2016-11-09

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional confidential ingredient “polyalcohol”.
  2. Disclose a reference to the HMIRA claim for exemption in lieu of the concentration of the confidential ingredient “polyalcohol”.
  3. Disclose a reference to the HMIRA claim for exemption in lieu of the concentration of the confidential ingredient “solvent naphtha (petroleum), heavy aroma”.
  4. Disclose an LD50 (rat, oral) value of 6.6 g/kg for the confidential ingredient “alkyl amine”.
  5. Disclose that an ingredient has been shown to cause mutagenic effects, in vitro.

RN: 9789 Date: 2016-11-16

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LD50 (rat, oral) value of 4 900 mg/kg, or equivalent, for the confidential ingredient “fatty amine derivative”.

RN: 9809 Date: 2016-11-08

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LC50 (rat, aerosol, 4 hours) value of 1.72 mg/L, or equivalent, for the confidential ingredient “hydrocarbon”.

RN: 9837 Date: 2016-11-21

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an acceptable concentration range for the confidential ingredient “heterocyclic base-amide-derivate”.
  2. Disclose “oxides of nitrogen” and “hydrogen chloride” as hazardous combustion products.

RN: 9842 Date: 2016-11-11

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the appropriate LD50 (rat, oral) value for the confidential ingredient “amine derivative” or the calculated product LD50 (rat, oral) value.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ISSUED THE DECISION THAT THE CLAIM FOR EXEMPTION WAS EITHER PARTIALLY VALID OR INVALID

In the case of the following claim, the screening officer issued the decision that the claim for exemption was partially valid.

Pursuant to section 18 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on an MSDS or a label pursuant to subsection 16(1) and information that has been disclosed on the relevant MSDS or label in compliance with an undertaking, and the dates on which the orders and notices referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act were issued.

RN: 9674

Date of compliance undertaking: 2016-10-07

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ISSUED A DECISION ON THE CLAIM FOR EXEMPTION BUT WHICH WERE DISCONTINUED PRIOR TO THE ISSUANCE OF EITHER A SIGNED UNDERTAKING OR SIGNED ORDERS

The screening officer has identified the following instances of non-compliance with the requirements of the relevant legislation.

RN: 9701

Date of statement of decision: 2016-09-13

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content, format and wording of the MSDS and had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional confidential ingredient “amino functional polymer”.
  2. Disclose the additional confidential ingredient “petroleum distillates”.
  3. Disclose an additional ingredient, along with its CAS registry number and its concentration.

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority

 

Members

 

Moccio, Santina Maria

2016-1042

Tartaglia, Anna T.

2016-1043

Donoghue, Christine

2016-1102

Associate Deputy Minister of Health

 

Duncan, Dwight Douglas

2016-1078

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

 

Chairperson

 

Duranceau, France-Elaine

2016-1044

Canada Revenue Agency

 

Director of the Board of Management

 

Gaul, The Hon. Geoffrey R. J.

2016-1095

Government of British Columbia

 

Administrator

 

December 18 to December 20, 2016

 

Hoy, The Hon. Alexandra H.

2016-1096

Government of Ontario

 

Administrator

 

December 19, 2016

 

Ossowski, John

2016-1101

Canada Border Services Agency

 

President

 

Ottenbreit, The Hon. Ralph K.

2016-1097

Government of Saskatchewan

 

Administrator

 

December 11 to December 31, 2016

 

Public Prosecutions

 

Acting Directors

 

Dolhai, George G.

2016-1045

Roussel, Kathleen

2016-1046

Redmond Gates, Donna

2016-1077

Saint John Port Authority

 

Director

 

Social Security Tribunal

 

Appeal Division

 

Full-time members

 

Brooks, Nancy Kathleen

2016-1022

Cheng, Shu-Tai

2016-1021

Part-time members

 

Cleversey Moffitt, Jennifer Ann

2016-1024

Netten, Shirley Lynn

2016-1025

Porter, Meredith Doreen

2016-1071

Smith, Peri Lynn

2016-1023

Employment Insurance Section

 

Full-time members

 

Adeoye, Oluwabukola Oluwarotimi

2016-1037

Kennedy, Alison Joanna

2016-1074

Klein, Lilian Ruth

2016-1036

Langlois, Josée

2016-1075

Leduc, Lucie

2016-1035

Marier, Yoan

2016-1073

Mitchell, Audrey

2016-1038

Syverin, Bernadette

2016-1039

Part-time members

 

Graves, Suzanne Louisa

2016-1041

Lampert, Leigh Andrew

2016-1076

Ryan Bourgeois, Angela Jean

2016-1040

Income Security Section

 

Full-time members

 

Cardillo, Antoinette

2016-1028

Moore, Michael Tyler

2016-1026

Tsakalis, George

2016-1027

Part-time members

 

Clark, Anne Shirley

2016-1032

Laidlaw, Jacqueline Ruth

2016-1029

Picotte, Adam Thomas

2016-1031

Rose, John Franklin Leonard

2016-1030

Toal, Alice Therese

2016-1072

Vanderhout, Pierre Maurice

2016-1034

Zwiers, Nicole Irena

2016-1033

December 9, 2016

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Senators called

His Excellency the Governor General has been pleased to summon to the Senate of Canada, by letters patent under the Great Seal of Canada bearing date of December 6, 2016:

  • — Christmas, Daniel, of Membertou, in the Province of Nova Scotia, member of the Senate and a Senator for the Province of Nova Scotia;
  • — Galvez, Rosa, of Lévis, in the Province of Quebec, member of the Senate and a Senator for the division of Bedford, in the Province of Quebec.

December 9, 2016

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[51-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-009-16 — Release of RSS-199, Issue 3

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has released an update to the following document:

  • Radio Standards Specifications RSS-199, Issue 3, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) Equipment Operating in the Band 2500-2690 MHz

RSS-199 sets out the requirements for certification of BRS equipment in the frequency band 2500-2690 MHz.

It should be noted that a transition period ending six months following the publication of RSS-199, Issue 3, on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website (www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum) is being provided, within which compliance with either RSS-199, Issue 3 or Issue 2, will be accepted. After that time, only compliance with RSS-199, Issue 3, will be accepted.

General information

The Radio Equipment Standards List (www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf06128.html) will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments on RSS-199 within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice using the online “General Inquiry” form at www.ic.gc.ca/res_general. Comments and suggestions for improving these standards may be submitted online using the “Standard Change Request” form at www.ic.gc.ca/res_change.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of the document referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

December 2016

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[51-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Director

Canada Pension Plan Investment Board

 

Chairperson

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

January 16, 2017

Director

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

January 16, 2017

Full-time and part-time members

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

January 9, 2017

Members

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

January 16, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

January 23, 2017

Trustees

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

January 9, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

January 23, 2017

Trustees

Canadian Museum of History

January 9, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

January 23, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

January 23, 2017

Trustees

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

January 9, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

January 23, 2017

Trustees

Canadian Museum of Nature

January 9, 2017

Permanent Members

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

January 16, 2017

Chief Science Advisor

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

January 27, 2017

Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

January 23, 2017

Trustees

National Gallery of Canada

January 9, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

January 23, 2017

Members

National Film Board

January 15, 2017

Trustees

National Museum of Science and Technology

January 9, 2017

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

January 9, 2017

Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

January 9, 2017

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

January 9, 2017

Chief Public Health Officer

Public Health Agency of Canada

February 12, 2017

Member

Telefilm Canada

January 15, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Innovation

President

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Directors

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Citizenship Judges

Citizenship Commission

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Clerk of the House of Commons

House of Commons

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Directors

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

Members

National Arts Centre Corporation

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

Commissioner

National Battlefields Commission

Full-time Member

National Energy Board

Director of Public Prosecutions

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

Procurement Ombudsman

Office of the Procurement Ombudsman

Executive Vice-Chairperson and Member

Parole Board of Canada

Chairperson

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Chairperson

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

Members

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

Directors

Royal Canadian Mint

Chairperson and Member

Standards Council of Canada

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

Members — All regional divisions (full-time positions and part-time positions)

Parole Board of Canada

Full-time and Part-time Members (Appeal Division)

Social Security Tribunal

Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Employment Insurance Section)

Social Security Tribunal

Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Income Security Section)

Social Security Tribunal

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

[51-1-o]

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT RETIRING ALLOWANCES ACT

2017 Member Contribution Rates (see footnote 5) for the Members of Parliament Pension Plan

In accordance with subsection 2.7(10) of the Members of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act, the contribution rates, for calendar year 2017, fixed under subsection 2.7(1) of the Act are as follows:

A. Contribution rates prior to reaching the 75% maximum pension accrual

Members of Parliament Retirement Allowances (MPRA) Account

Calendar Year

Under Age 71

Ages 71 and Above

Combined

Below YMPE (see footnote 6)

YMPE to MPE (see footnote 7)

Above MPE (see footnote 8)

Combined (see footnote 9)

2017

11.15%

14.24%

0.00%

10.99%

0.00%

10.37%


Members of Parliament Retirement Compensation Arrangements (MPRCA) Account

Calendar Year

Under Age 71

Ages 71 and Above

Combined

Below MPE (see footnote 10)

Above MPE (see footnote 11)

Combined (see footnote 12)

2017

6.36%

19.48%

8.49%

19.48%

9.11%

B. Contribution rates upon reaching the 75% maximum pension accrual

Calendar Year 2017

MPRA

MPRCA

Members Under Age 71

1.00% (salary up to MPE (see footnote 13))

1.00% (salary above the MPE (see footnote 14))

Members 71 and Above

0.00%

1.00%

Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

[51-1-o]

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote b
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote c
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 1
    CAS RN: Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number. The Chemical Abstracts Service information is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    The Federal Business Number is a nine-digit registration number issued by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to Canadian businesses that register for one or more of the following: corporate income tax; importer/exporter account number; payroll (source) deductions (trust accounts); or goods and services tax. This number can be found on all forms issued to a business by the CRA. The first nine digits that appear on these forms are the Federal Business Number.
  • Footnote 3
    Supplement, Canada Gazette, Part I, January 31, 1998
  • Footnote 4
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 5
    Expressed as a percentage of the total pensionable earnings.
  • Footnote 6
    YMPE: Year’s Maximum Pensionable Earnings are the maximum earnings for which contributions can be made to the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan during the year. For 2017, the YMPE is $55,300.
  • Footnote 7
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.
  • Footnote 8
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.
  • Footnote 9
    If expressed as a percentage of the pensionable payroll of members under the age of 71.
  • Footnote 10
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.
  • Footnote 11
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.
  • Footnote 12
    If expressed as a percentage of the pensionable payroll of members under the age of 71.
  • Footnote 13
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.
  • Footnote 14
    MPE: Maximum Pensionable Earnings are calculated based on the defined benefit limit established by the Income Tax Act, which represent the maximum pensionable earnings on which pension benefits can be accrued during a calendar year. Since 2016, the MPE takes into consideration the coordination of the retirement allowance payable with the benefits of the Canada Pension Plan or the Quebec Pension Plan. For 2017, the MPE is $153,100.