ARCHIVED — Vol. 151, No. 17 — April 29, 2017

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) ATCC (see footnote 1) 13367 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Bacillus thuringiensis ATCC 13367 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of Bacillus thuringiensis ATCC 13367

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Bacillus thuringiensis ATCC 13367 (B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367).

B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium. As a species, Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) is generally considered ubiquitous and is commonly found in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. B. thuringiensis is able to form spores that can withstand harsh environmental conditions and survive under conditions of nutrient depletion. Various characteristics of B. thuringiensis make it suitable for use as an active ingredient in commercial and consumer products, including degreasers, detergents, and additives in bioremediation and biodegradation, and in various industrial processes. Strains other than B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 are commonly used as the active ingredient in certain pest control products.

B. thuringiensis is known particularly for its entomopathogenic properties due to the production of crystal proteins (Cry toxins), which are toxic for various orders of insects (mainly lepidopterans, dipterans and coleopterans). B. thuringiensis produces other virulence factors, which are thought to facilitate its development within the insect host. These include degradative enzymes, such as phospholipases and hemolysins, other toxins (including Cyt, Vip and β-exotoxin), enterotoxins and a number of extracellular compounds. Various subspecies of B. thuringiensis are widely used as biopesticides and vector control agents against specific pest invertebrates in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. In particular, B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 is known to produce a Cry 1B (Cry1Ba) toxin, which is known to be selectively toxic towards insect species of the order Lepidoptera, as well as towards a few species of the orders Diptera and Coleoptera. B. thuringiensis has been used as an insecticide for approximately 60 years. While its use as a biopesticide reduces numbers of target insect larvae locally, there are no known adverse population-level effects on target species in the ecosystems where it is used. There is no evidence that applications of B. thuringiensis to soil or water will adversely affect non-target terrestrial or aquatic invertebrates at a population level. Despite the ubiquity and abundant use of various B. thuringiensis subspecies, there are no reports of the species causing adverse effects in aquatic or terrestrial plants or vertebrates in the scientific literature.

B. thuringiensis is not considered a human pathogen, and to date, no mammalian pathogenicity and toxicity study has demonstrated that commercial spore preparations of any B. thuringiensis subspecies cause adverse effects by any route of exposure. B. thuringiensis has been isolated from a few gastrointestinal, ocular and wound infections. Some B. thuringiensis strains, including ATCC 13367, have been reported to produce enterotoxins and membrane-damaging toxins. These toxins are known as important factors for pathogenicity of a close relative, Bacillus cereus, in humans. However, the significance of the presence of these virulence factors in B. thuringiensis in relation to human infections is not clear. The scientific literature reports very few cases of infection linked to B. thuringiensis. B. thuringiensis is resistant to several clinical antibiotics, but effective treatments against infection are available.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that products containing B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 were imported into Canada during the 2008 reporting year for pest control use, and in very small quantities for research and development (R&D). However, upon further examination, several lines of evidence suggested that the product reported for pest control use following publication of the section 71 notice was not related to B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367, but to other subspecies and strains of B. thuringiensis that are currently registered under the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA).

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment from anthropogenic sources in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that B. thuringiensis ATCC 13367 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of four substances in the EDTA and its salts group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and tetrasodium EDTA identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on ferric monosodium EDTA and ferric ammonium EDTA pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on EDTA and tetrasodium EDTA pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of EDTA and its salts group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of four substances referred to collectively as the EDTA and its salts group. Although there are other EDTA salts, the substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RN (see footnote 2), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names, and the common names of the substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the EDTA and its salts group

CAS RN

DSL name

Common names

60-00-4

Glycine, N,N ′-1,2-ethanediylbis[N-(carboxymethyl)-

Ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or edetic acid

64-02-8

Glycine, N,N ′-1,2-ethanediylbis[N-(carboxymethyl)-, tetrasodium salt

Tetrasodium EDTA

15708-41-5 (see footnote a)

Ferrate(1-), [[N,N ′-1,2-ethanediylbis[N-(carboxymethyl)glycinato]](4-)-N,N ′,O,O ′,ON,ON ′]-, sodium, (OC-6-21)-

Ferric monosodium EDTA

21265-50-9 (see footnote b)

Ferrate(1-), [[N,N ′-1,2-ethanediylbis[N-(carboxymethyl)glycinato]](4-)-N,N ′,O,O ′,ON,ON ′]-, ammonium, (OC-6-21)-

Ferric ammonium EDTA

The four substances in this group do not occur naturally in the environment. Some of them are primarily used as chelating agents or preservatives in cleaning products, cosmetics, prescription and non-prescription drugs, natural health products, and products used by consumers. Other uses include manufacturing products for printing inks, paints and coatings, ion exchange agents, automotive care, water treatment, food packaging and pest control products. In 2011, only EDTA and tetrasodium EDTA were manufactured in Canada in quantities ranging from 100 to 10 000 kg. In the same year, all four substances were imported into Canada in quantities ranging from 100 to 10 000 000 kg.

The ecological risks of the substances in the EDTA and its salts group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web-derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the four substances in the EDTA and its salts group as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, ferric monosodium EDTA, and ferric ammonium EDTA. It is proposed to conclude that EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, ferric monosodium EDTA, and ferric ammonium EDTA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, potential indirect exposures to the EDTA and its salts group were estimated by using a down-the-drain scenario for wastewater and industrial effluents. Potential direct dermal and oral exposures were also considered from pest control products, prescription and non-prescription drugs, natural health products, foods, cosmetics, and other products used by consumers. Risks related to the inhalation of substances in the EDTA and its salts group were not considered to be of concern due to their low to negligible volatility, as well as their potential uses.

Based on structural similarity and ability to chelate metals, EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, ferric monosodium EDTA, and ferric ammonium EDTA were grouped together. A read-across approach was used in the absence of substance-specific data for the assessment of human health effects. Since other EDTA salts (e.g. Na2EDTA) also dissociate under biological conditions into the EDTA anionic and cationic components, data from other EDTA salts were used in assessing the hazard for substances in the EDTA and its salts group.

The four substances within this group are not considered to be carcinogenic or genotoxic. In laboratory studies, systemic effects were observed only at high doses equal to or exceeding the limit dose of 1 000 mg/kg bw/day and were considered secondary to the chelating properties of substances in this group. In conjunction with the low oral and dermal absorption of the substances in the group, health effects from exposure to the EDTA and its salts group are not expected.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, ferric monosodium EDTA, and ferric ammonium EDTA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, ferric monosodium EDTA, and ferric ammonium EDTA do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website  (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bertrand, Françoise, O.C.

2017-339

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

 

Chairperson

 

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Full-time members

 

Addario, Lisa Clare

2017-341

Brady, Thomas Erskine Frank

2017-343

Hunter, John J. L., Q.C.

2017-349

Court of Appeal for British Columbia

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Court of Appeal of Yukon

 

Judge

 

Mayer, Andrew P.

2017-350

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judges ex officio

 

Nakatsuru, The Hon. Shaun S.

2017-351

Ryan Bell, Robyn M.

2017-352

April 21, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

ELECTRICITY AND GAS INSPECTION ACT

Delegation of authorities by the President of Measurement Canada

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 4(2) of the Electricity and Gas Inspection Regulations, that the President of Measurement Canada, pursuant to subsection 4(1) of the Regulations, proposes to delegate to the organization set out in column I of the Schedule the functions under the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act set out in column II thereof.

SCHEDULE

Electricity and Gas Inspection Regulations

Column I

Column II

EPCOR Distribution & Transmission Inc. (EDTI)
13410 St. Albert Trail N.W. Edmonton, Alberta
T5L 4P2

8(1): For the purposes of section 5 of the Act, the calibration of a measuring apparatus referred to in section 7 shall be certified by the director.

EPCOR Distribution & Transmission Inc. (EDTI) is being delegated this function for the following types of measuring apparatus:

Electricity meter calibration consoles.

April 29, 2017

Alan E. Johnston
President
Measurement Canada

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Sûreté du Québec as fingerprint examiners:

  • Brigitte Bédard
  • Pierre Bergeron
  • Christian Coulombe
  • Carol De Champlain
  • Steven Montembeault
  • Germain Tremblay

Ottawa, April 13, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Toronto Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Toronto Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective June 8, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2) of the Act, the Authority wishes to dispose of two parcels of real property bearing property identification numbers (PIN) 21384-0120(LT) and 21384-0121(LT) and described as item 7 in Part A of Schedule C of its letters patent (“Real Property”);

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to reflect the disposition of the Real Property;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Item 7 of Part A of Schedule C of the letters patent is deleted.
  • 2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the applicable land registry office of the deeds of sale evidencing the transfer of the real property.

ISSUED under my hand this 11th day of April, 2017.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Toronto Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Toronto Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective June 8, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to lease as lessee, the real property described below (“Real Property”);

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the leasehold interest in the Real Property;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Adding to the end of Part B of Schedule C of the letters patent, the following description:

9.  60 Harbour Street

A portion of the building located at 60 Harbour St., Toronto, Ontario, consisting of the second and sixth floors and portions of the third and fifth floors, which building is situated on Part of Block 3, Plan 655E Toronto designated as Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 & 10, Plan 66R-22804, subject to a heritage easement over Parts 2, 3, 4 & 5, Plan 66R-22804 as in CT918882; together with an easement over Part of Blocks 18 and 19 on Plan 694-E designated as parts 5, 8, 14, 16 &  20 on Plan 66R-24637 as in AT4067839, partially released by AT4210939; City of Toronto and known as “PIN 21384-0121(LT)”

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of commencement of the lease term set out in the leasehold interest mentioned above.

ISSUED under my hand this 11th day of April, 2017.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS the Governor in Council, pursuant to Part 5.1 of the Port Authorities Management Regulations, issued a Certificate of Amalgamation containing letters patent to amalgamate the Vancouver Port Authority, the Fraser River Port Authority and the North Fraser Port Authority to continue as the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (“Authority”), effective January 1, 2008;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), the Authority wishes to acquire the real property bearing parcel identifier (PID) 003-578-259;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister of Transport issue supplementary letters patent to set out the real property in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Transport is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after the description of real property that begins with “That parcel totaling 17,200 m2”:

PID NUMBER

DESCRIPTION

003-578-259

Lot 41, Section 24, Block 5 North, Range 6 West, New Westminster District, Plan 28843

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the New Westminster Land Title Office of the documents evidencing the transfer of the real property to the Authority.

ISSUED this 7th day of April, 2017.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Consultations on a potential Free Trade Agreement with MERCOSUR

Promoting trade and investment with emerging markets is a priority for the Government of Canada. The government’s approach is one that puts the interests of Canadians and opportunities for the middle class, women, youth and Indigenous people, front and centre.

The Government of Canada is seeking the views of the Canadian public and interested Canadian stakeholders on the scope of potential negotiations regarding a possible Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between Canada and MERCOSUR (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay).

Background

During his trip to Argentina in November 2016, Prime Minister Trudeau committed to maintaining an ongoing dialogue on deepening the Canada–MERCOSUR trade and investment relationship. (see footnote 3) In recent months, Canada and MERCOSUR have sought to reassess the potential for an economically significant and mutually beneficial FTA.

MERCOSUR, also known as the Southern Cone Common Market, is a customs union established by Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay in 1991. This regional bloc represents a significant economic presence in Latin America. In 2016, the four members of MERCOSUR had a combined GDP of US$2.4 trillion (CAN$3.2 trillion) and a population of 260 million.

In 2016, Canada’s bilateral merchandise trade with the bloc totalled nearly $8.1 billion. Canadian direct investment abroad in the bloc was valued at $14.7 billion and the bloc’s total inward foreign direct investment stock is valued at $19.7 billion. Two-way services trade between Canada and MERCOSUR’s Argentina and Brazil nearly reached $1.3 billion in 2015.

Canada has Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements with Argentina (1993) and Uruguay (1999). Canada and Brazil have signed a bilateral Air Transport Agreement (2011), a Social Security Agreement (2008), and a Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement (2011).

A potential free trade agreement with MERCOSUR could result in economic gains for Canadians, including importers and exporters of goods and services, investors and consumers, by improving bilateral market access and enhancing transparency and predictability of trade and investment for Canadian businesses.

More information on the Government’s consultations on a potential Canada–MERCOSUR Free Trade Agreement can be found at Global Affairs Canada: Consulting Canadians on a Possible Canada–MERCOSUR Free Trade [www.international.gc.ca/MERCOSURtrade].

All interested parties are invited to submit their views by May 29, 2017. Please be advised that any information received as a result of this consultation will be considered as public information, unless explicitly requested otherwise.

Submissions should include the following:

  1. the contributor’s name and address and, if applicable, the name of the contributor’s organization, institution or business;
  2. the specific issues being addressed; and
  3. where possible, precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada’s domestic or international interests.

Contributions can be sent by email or mail to

Email:  consultations@international.gc.ca

Address:

Canada–MERCOSUR trade consultations
Global Affairs Canada
Trade Negotiations Division (TCW)
Lester B. Pearson Building
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2

Submissions by interested parties

The following are examples of areas where the Government would appreciate receiving views:

  • Trade and investment interests
    • Canadian goods of export or import interest (identified by HS/Tariff codes) that would benefit from the expedited or phased-in removal of tariffs and other barriers by MERCOSUR or Canada, as well as any import sensitivities;
    • Rules of origin, including the appropriate rules of origin for specific products or sectors (identified by HS/Tariff codes), that would be required to benefit from preferential tariff treatment;
    • Trade in services, specifically, whether MERCOSUR countries are a priority market, identification of sectors and activities of export interest for Canadian service providers, market access barriers and domestic regulatory measures that either restrict or affect their ability to conduct business or deliver their service in MERCOSUR, and whether the ability to conduct trade in services would be improved through the transparent listing of domestic regulatory measures that limit market access;
    • Temporary entry of business people from Canada into MERCOSUR and from MERCOSUR into Canada (e.g. any impediments when entering MERCOSUR, or Canada, to work on a temporary basis);
    • Electronic commerce (e.g. any restrictive measures faced by Canadian suppliers of digital products and services in MERCOSUR, such as requirements for data localization);
    • Non-tariff barriers (such as import licensing, administration of tariff-rate quotas, taxes, lack of transparency), technical barriers to trade (including technical regulations, standards or conformity assessment procedures), and sanitary and phytosanitary measures;
    • Border and customs issues that have an impact on the movement of commercial goods into and out of MERCOSUR;
    • Investment barriers faced by Canadian investors in MERCOSUR, including restrictions imposed on foreign ownership or entry to market, questions of transparency of regulation and performance requirements;
    • Priority government procurement markets for Canadian suppliers in MERCOSUR at the central, provincial and local levels, including the goods, services and construction services that Canadian suppliers are interested in selling to those government organizations, as well as barriers faced when selling or attempting to sell to governments in MERCOSUR;
    • Any incident affecting business practices when interacting with state-owned enterprises (in Canada or in MERCOSUR);
    • MERCOSUR’s application and enforcement of intellectual property (IP) laws, regulations, policies or procedures that may result in discrimination against foreign intellectual property such as brand names, and any requirements for the sharing or transfer of IP or confidential business information;
    • Competition policy matters, including competition law enforcement or other measures affecting competition in MERCOSUR;
    • Preferred approach to trade remedies taken on trade between MERCOSUR and Canada; and
    • Any incidents of unfair business practices.
  • Interests and values of Canadians
    • Sustainable development;
    • Corporate social responsibility;
    • Transparency;
    • Equality;
    • Trade and gender;
    • Good governance;
    • Rule of law;
    • Non-discrimination;
    • Respect for the environment;
    • Culture;
    • Labour rights; and
    • Human rights.
  • Other topics
    • Any other topics of interest or potential concern to Canadians related to a potential free trade agreement.

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Coun- cil Appointments website (www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Commissioner for Workers

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

May 1, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

May 8, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

May 8, 2017

Directors

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

May 8, 2017

President

Canadian Institutes
of Health Research

May 1, 2017

Directors

Marine Atlantic Inc.

May 8, 2017

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

May 8, 2017

Chairperson

National Aboriginal Economic Development Board

May 8, 2017

Members

National Aboriginal Economic Development Board

May 8, 2017

Regional
Vice-Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson (Appeal Division)

Parole Board of Canada

May 1, 2017

Chairperson

Ridley Terminals Inc.

May 8, 2017

Directors

Ridley Terminals Inc.

May 8, 2017

Ongoing opportunities

Position

Organization

Closing date

Members

Veterans Review
and Appeal Board

July 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Commissioner

British Columbia Treaty Commission

Director

Canada Post Corporation

Chairperson

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Director

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Chairperson

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Directors

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Chairperson

Export Development Canada

Directors

Export Development Canada

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Commissioners

First Nations Tax Commission

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

President

International Development Research Centre

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

Chief Executive Officer

Invest in Canada Agency

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

Correctional Investigator of Canada

Office of the Correctional Investigator of Canada

Chairperson

Parole Board of Canada

Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

Members

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

[17-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at March 31, 2017

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

18.7

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

6,997.4

 

Advances to members of Payments Canada (see footnote 1*)

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

6.8

 
   

7,004.2

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

16,620.9

 

Government of Canada bonds

79,289.0

 

Other investments

406.4

 
   

96,316.3

Property and equipment

 

570.6

Intangible assets

 

36.0

Other assets

 

214.2

 

104,160.0


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

77,794.0

Deposits

Government of Canada

22,506.1

 

Members of Payments Canada (see footnote 2*)

500.3

 

Other deposits

2,279.2

 
   

25,285.6

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

582.0

   

103,661.6

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

368.4

 
   

498.4

104,160.0

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, March 18, 2017

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, March 18, 2017

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

[17-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    American Type Culture Collection
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 3
    http://pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2016/11/18/fact-sheet-strengthening-ties-between-canada-and-argentina-and-creating-new
  • Footnote a
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote b
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote 1*
    Formerly “Canada Payments Association”
  • Footnote 2*
    Formerly “Canada Payments Association”