Vol. 152, No. 5 — February 3, 2018

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — thioperoxydicarbonic diamide ([(H2N)C(S)]2S2), tetramethyl- (TMTD), CAS RN (see footnote 1) 137-26-8, and piperidine, 1,1‘-(tetrathiodicarbonothioyl)bis- (DPTT), CAS RN 120-54-7 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas TMTD is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on TMTD pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on DPTT pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that TMTD meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that DPTT does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that TMTD be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on DPTT at this time.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for TMTD to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure to TMTD.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure that the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Marc D’Iorio
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of TMTD and DPTT

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively as the Thiocarbamates Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they either met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) of the substances, their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their acronyms are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Thiocarbamates Group

CAS RN

DSL name (acronyms)

137-26-8 (see note a)

Thioperoxydicarbonic diamide ([(H2N)C(S)]2S2), tetramethyl- (TMTD, Thiram, Thiuram)

120-54-7 (see note b)

Piperidine, 1,1′-(tetrathiodicarbonothioyl)bis-
(DPTT)

TMTD and DPTT do not occur naturally in the environment. Information obtained from DSL Inventory Update phases 1 and 2 indicates that there was no company having manufactured either of these substances in Canada above the 100 kg reporting threshold. However, between 170 300 and 403 100 kg of TMTD were imported into Canada in 2008 and 150 000 kg of DPTT were imported in 2011.

TMTD is primarily used as a process regulator for manufacturing rubber products in Canada. It is used as a component in automotive parts and in sealants and adhesives. This substance is also registered as an active ingredient in pest control products in Canada (known as Thiram) and in the manufacture of a limited number of food packaging materials.

DPTT is only used as a process regulator for manufacturing rubber products in Canada.

Releases of TMTD and DPTT to surface water are expected to occur mainly as a result of discharges from wastewater treatment systems associated with facilities manufacturing rubber products.

TMTD and DPTT are expected to degrade rapidly in the environment, and their potential for long-range transport is low. Bioconcentration factors based on empirical data are low for both substances; in addition, mammalian data suggest that they could undergo rapid metabolism and elimination. Current uses of these substances may result in exposure only to aquatic organisms near points of release.

Empirical data suggest that TMTD is highly toxic to aquatic organisms. DPTT does not demonstrate any effect on aquatic organisms at water solubility limits.

The ecological risk characterization for TMTD indicates that releases from current uses of this substance in manufacturing rubber products may pose a risk to aquatic organisms. The risk to aquatic organisms associated with current uses of DPTT in manufacturing rubber products is considered to be low.

Considering all lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that TMTD meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that TMTD does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Considering all lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that DPTT does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

From a human health perspective, TMTD was reviewed internationally through the Cooperative Chemicals Assessment Programme of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), as well as by Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA). The latter identified health effects of concern for TMTD associated with its pesticidal uses, including developmental neurotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Pesticidal uses and sources of exposure to TMTD are being addressed under the Pest Control Products Act, as part of Health Canada’s re-evaluation of Thiram, and will, consequently, not be addressed in this draft screening assessment.

For the general population of Canada, exposure to TMTD present in the environment as a result of non-pesticidal uses is not expected to be significant, due to the substance’s rapid photodegradation and hydrolysis in water, low persistence in soil, and low volatility. In Canada, TMTD is not a permitted food additive, nor is it used in any prescription or non-prescription drug, natural health product, or cosmetics. Regarding its use in the manufacture of a limited number of food packaging materials, dietary exposure from this use, if any, is expected to be negligible. Exposure to TMTD is not expected from its uses in automobiles or from rubber products, since residues are not expected in the final products. In products available to the general population, exposure to TMTD from the use of adhesive tape products is expected to be minimal.

DPTT was evaluated using the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC)-based approach for certain substances, which is based on the potential hazard of similar chemical structures as well as available chemical-specific genotoxicity data. The estimate of exposure derived for DPTT was lower than the TTC value, which indicates a low probability of risk to human health. Therefore, DPTT is considered to be a low concern for human health at current levels of exposure.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that TMTD and DPTT do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that TMTD meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. It is proposed to conclude that DPTT does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Furthermore, it is proposed that TMTD does not meet the persistence or bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the general population to TMTD from non-pesticidal uses is not of concern at current levels, this substance is considered to have health effects of concern, including developmental neurotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Therefore, there may be concern for human health if exposure levels were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns are under consideration. Potential risks to the environment will be addressed through risk management actions.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substance that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substance, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for TMTD and DPTT and the risk management scope document for TMTD are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

[5-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Basran, Jasvinder Singh

2018-32

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

Culbertson, Mary

2018-17

Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan

 

Treaty Commissioner

 

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Brown, Susan Margaret

2018-26

McLeod, Miriam

2018-25

Molloy, W. Thomas, O.C., S.O.M., Q.C.

 

Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan

 

Nishikawa, Sandra

2018-33

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Nolin, Pascale

2018-34

Superior Court for the district of Montréal in and for the Province of Quebec

 

Puisne Judge

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time member and Chairperson

 

Oades, Jennifer

2018-18

Full-time members

 

Boyko, Kathryn

2018-22

Snyder, Christine Rudolph

2018-19

Part-time members

 

Bustros, Katia

2018-20

Lapommeray, Jacques J. M.

2018-21

January 26, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[5-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Directors

Bank of Canada

February 20, 2018

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

February 19, 2018

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

 

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

President

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

February 26, 2018

Members (Northwest Territories)

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada

February 12, 2018

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Parliamentary Librarian

Library of Parliament

 

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Deputy Director

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

February 12, 2018

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal

 

Executive Director

Telefilm Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

 

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

June 29, 2018

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

[5-1-o]

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

PUBLIC SERVICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
CANADIAN FORCES SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS

Quarterly rates

In accordance with subsection 46(3) of the Public Service Superannuation Regulations, subsection 36(3) of the Canadian Forces Superannuation Regulations and subsection 30(3) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Regulations, the quarterly rates used for calculating interest for the purpose of subsection (1) of each of the corresponding sections are as follows:

As of:

March 31, 2017 1.0588%

June 30, 2017 1.0413%

September 30, 2017 1.0273%

December 31, 2017 1.0175%

Scott Brison
President

[5-1-o]