Vol. 152, No. 8 — February 24, 2018

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to amend the Domestic Substances List under subsection 112(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 106(3) of that Act applies to the living organism Trichoderma reesei ATCC 74252

Whereas the living organism Trichoderma reesei ATCC 74252 is specified on the Domestic Substances List; (see footnote 1)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of the living organism under section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999; (see footnote 2)

And whereas the ministers suspect that the information concerning a significant new activity in relation to the living organism may contribute to determining the circumstances in which the living organism is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 112(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 106(3) of that Act applies to any significant new activities relating to the living organism, as set out in this notice.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days of the publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment comments with respect to this proposal. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent by mail to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

The final screening assessment for this living organism may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit, with the information, a request that it be treated as confidential.

George Enei
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

1. Part 5 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by deleting the following under the heading “Organisms/Organismes”:

Trichoderma reesei ATCC 74252

2. Part 6 of the List is proposed to be amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

Column 1

Living organism

Column 2

Significant new activity for which living organism is subject to subsection 106(3) of the Act

Trichoderma reesei ATCC 74252 S′

1. Any activity involving the living organism in Column 1, opposite to this section, other than

  • (a) its submerged fermentation in the absence of light with no solid plant material or insoluble substrate present;
  • (b) its use as a research and development organism, as this expression is defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms); or
  • (c) its culture in a vessel where it is inactivated prior to or upon removal from the vessel and all solid and liquid wastes from the living organism are incinerated.
 

2. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister at least 120 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:

  • (a) a description of the proposed significant new activity in relation to the living organism;
  • (b) the information specified in paragraphs 1(a) to (g), sections 2 and 3, paragraphs 4(a) and (c), and sections 7 and 9 of Schedule 1 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms);
  • (c) the data and report from a study conducted to determine the identity and quantity of peptaibols produced by the living organism and present in any liquid culture medium in the course of the significant new activity;
  • (d) if the study in paragraph (c) shows that peptaibols are produced by the living organism or present in liquid culture medium:
    • (i) the data and report from a study conducted to determine the effects of the living organism, in conditions where it produces peptaibols, on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate species likely to be exposed to it in the course of the significant new activity; and
    • (ii) the data and report from a study conducted to determine the effects of peptaibols produced by the living organism on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate species likely to be exposed to them in the course of the significant new activity;
  • (e) all other information and test data in respect of the living organism and its secondary metabolites that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they may be reasonably expected to have access, and that are relevant to identifying the hazards of the living organism and its secondary metabolites to the environment and human health and the degree of environmental and public exposure to the living organism and its secondary metabolites;
  • (f) the identification of every government agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the living organism and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment, and the risk management actions in relation to the living organism imposed by those agencies;
  • (g) the name, civic and postal addresses and telephone number and, if any, fax number and email address of the person proposing the significant new activity and, if they are not resident in Canada, of the person resident in Canada who is authorized to act on their behalf;
  • (h) the name, civic and postal addresses and telephone number and, if any, fax number and email address of the head of the quality assurance unit of every laboratory that developed test data included in the information; and
  • (i) a certification stating that the information is accurate and complete, dated and signed by the person proposing the significant new activity, if they are resident in Canada or, if not, by the person resident in Canada who is authorized to act on their behalf.
 

3. The studies described in paragraph 2(c) and subparagraph 2(d)(ii) must be conducted in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice set out in Annex 2 of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, and that are current at the time the studies are conducted.

 

4. The studies described in
subparagraph 2(d)(i) must be conducted according to the Environment and Climate Change Canada report EPS 1/RM/44 titled Guidance Document for Testing the Pathogenicity and Toxicity of New Microbial Substances to Aquatic and Terrestrial Organisms.

 

5. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 120 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

Coming into Force

3. The Order would come into force on the day on which it is registered.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the notice of intent.)

Description

This notice of intent (NOI) is an opportunity for the public to comment on the proposed amendment to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) to apply the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) (see footnote 3) to the living organism Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) strain ATCC 74252.

Within 60 days of publication of the notice of intent, any person may submit comments to the Minister of the Environment. These comments will be taken into consideration during the development of the Order amending the DSL to apply the SNAc provisions to this living organism.

The DSL amendment is not in force until the Order is adopted by the Minister pursuant to subsection 112(3) of CEPA. The Order must be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Applicability of the proposed Order

It is proposed that the Order amending the DSL requires any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to T. reesei ATCC 74252 to submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Order at least 120 days prior to the import, manufacture, or use of the living organism for the significant new activity.

Examples of potential activities with respect to T. reesei ATCC 74252 requiring a SNAN include, but are not limited to, any activity involving the living organism where it is grown or cultured under conditions other than submerged fermentation in the absence of light with no solid plant material or insoluble substrate present. Examples of this type of activity include submerged fermentation with solid plant material, solid state fermentation, or any use where the living organism is applied to the environment, such as bioremediation.

Activities not subject to the proposed Order

The proposed Order would not apply to the submerged fermentation of the living organism in the absence of light with no solid plant material or insoluble substrate present, or to any activity involving the living organism where the living organism is cultured in a vessel, inactivated prior to or upon removal from the vessel and all solid and liquid wastes from the living organism are incinerated.

Activities involving the use of the living organism as a research and development organism, as the term “research and development organism” is defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms) would be excluded from the proposed Order.

The proposed Order would not apply to uses of the living organism that are regulated under any Act of Parliament listed in Schedule 4 of CEPA, including but not limited to, the Pest Control Products Act, the Seeds Act, the Fertilizers Act, the Feeds Act, and the Health of Animals Act. The Order would also not apply to impurities and contaminants related to the preparation of the living organism or, in some circumstances, to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that the individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the Order. See subsection 106(6) and section 3 of CEPA, and section 2 of New substances: guidelines for organisms for additional information on the activities and conditions described above.

Information to be submitted

The NOI sets out the proposed requirements for information that would have to be provided to the Minister 120 days before the day on which the living organism is imported, manufactured, or used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN and other information to conduct environmental and human health assessments within 120 days after the complete information is received.

The information requirements in the proposed Order relate to general information in respect of the living organism, details surrounding its use, and exposure information. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 7 of the New substances: guidelines for organisms.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a living organism is subject to the SNAc provisions, (see footnote 4) a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they ought to have access. The phrase “to which they ought to have access” means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a living organism, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheet (SDS). (see footnote 5)

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products and may not include information on microbial hazards. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients or microbial constituents that may be subject to an Order due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the living organism is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the living organism is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person receives possession and control of a living organism from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if the activities were covered by the original SNAN. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject.

Any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a living organism subject to an Order should notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Order, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with an Order, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to contact the Substances Management Information Line. (see footnote 6)

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to the following factors, when deciding which enforcement measure to take: nature of the alleged violation, effectiveness in achieving compliance with CEPA and its regulations and consistency in enforcement.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

FISHERIES ACT (R.S.C., 1985, C. F-14)

Notice respecting the Administrative Agreement between the Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada regarding the administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations in New Brunswick

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment has concluded with New Brunswick the annexed “Administrative Agreement between the Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada Regarding the Administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations in New Brunswick,” pursuant to subsection 4.1 of the Fisheries Act.

Interested persons requiring additional information may send a request to the following email address: ec.eaux-usees-wastewater.ec@canada.ca.

Ottawa, February 24, 2018

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ADMINISTRATIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW BRUNSWICK AND THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA REGARDING THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE WASTEWATER SYSTEMS EFFLUENT REGULATIONS IN NEW BRUNSWICK

This Administrative Agreement is made on the 28th day of February, 2018 (the “Effective Date”) between:

THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA as represented by the Minister of the Environment who is responsible for Environment and Climate Change Canada (“Canada”)

and

THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW BRUNSWICK as represented by the Minister of Environment and Local Government (“New Brunswick”)

Throughout this Administrative Agreement, “Parties” means Canada and New Brunswick collectively, and “Party” means Canada or New Brunswick, individually.

WHEREAS the Parties are signatories to the Canada-wide Strategy for the Management of Municipal Wastewater Effluent;

AND WHEREAS Canada published the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations as one of the federal government’s commitments to implement the Canada-wide Strategy for the Management of Municipal Wastewater Effluent;

AND WHEREAS New Brunswick promulgated the Water Quality Regulation — Clean Environment Act which aims at protecting provincial waters from pollution through, among other measures, the issuance of approvals to construct, modify or operate wastewater works;

AND WHEREAS the Parties recognize that there is a benefit to adopting a cooperative and harmonized approach to reduce administrative duplication resulting from comparable legislative and regulatory provisions, and that there is a need to specify the procedures of this approach in an agreement;

AND WHEREAS the Parties agree that New Brunswick, due to its existing relationship with owners and operators of municipally, privately, and provincially-owned wastewater systems, is well positioned to act as the principal point of contact for the administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations;

AND WHEREAS section 4.1 of the Fisheries Act and the Order Designating the Minister of the Environment as the Minister Responsible for the Administration and Enforcement of Subsections 36(3) to (6) of the Fisheries Act enable the Minister of the Environment to enter into agreements with a province to further the purposes of the Act, including facilitating joint action in areas of common interest, reducing overlap and harmonizing respective programs;

AND WHEREAS section 15 of the Clean Environment Act enables New Brunswick to enter into agreements with the Government of Canada relating to any matter pertaining to the environment;

AND WHEREAS effective July 10, 2014, the Parties concluded an Administrative Agreement between the Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada Regarding the Administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations in New Brunswick (the “2014 Agreement”), as amended by the Parties on July 8, 2017, to extend its term;

AND WHEREAS by concluding this Agreement, the Parties hereby terminate the 2014 Agreement;

NOW THEREFORE the Parties agree as follows:

1. DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION
2. PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES OF THE AGREEMENT
2.1 Purpose

The purpose of this Agreement is to facilitate cooperation between the Parties with respect to the administration and enforcement of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations and to reduce regulatory duplication resulting from comparable federal and provincial legislation with respect to wastewater in New Brunswick.

2.2 Objectives

The objectives of this Agreement are to

3. PRINCIPLES
4. ACTIVITIES COVERED BY THIS AGREEMENT

The Parties agree to collaborate in carrying out the following activities:

4.1 Authorization Officer for the WSER
4.2 Reporting
4.3 New Brunswick Commitments for the WSER
4.4 Cooperation on Compliance Promotion
4.5 Cooperation on Enforcement
4.6 Management Committee for this Agreement
5. ACCOUNTABILITY
6. ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND PRIVACY
7. FINANCIAL PROVISIONS
8. AMENDMENT AND REVIEW OF THIS AGREEMENT
9. EXECUTION, DURATION, EXPIRY AND TERMINATION OF THE AGREEMENT
10. SURVIVAL FOLLOWING EXPIRY OR TERMINATION OF THIS AGREEMENT
11. DISPUTE RESOLUTION
12. OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
13. ENTIRE AGREEMENT

IN WITNESS WHEREOF this Agreement has been executed on behalf of Canada by the Minister of the Environment, and on behalf of New Brunswick by the Minister of Environment and Local Government:

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA
The Honourable Catherine McKenna

February 13, 2018

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW BRUNSWICK
The Honourable Serge Rousselle

December 15, 2017

ANNEX A

THE PARTIES’ ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES CONCERNING THE EFFLUENT REGULATORY REPORTING INFORMATION SYSTEM (ERRIS)

1. Roles and Responsibilities

Working together the Parties will

Canada will

New Brunswick will

2. Regulatory Reporting using the ERRIS

Canada will continue to provide

3. Costs and Expenditures

ANNEX B

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE FOR THE ADMINISTRATIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA AND THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW BRUNSWICK REGARDING THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE WASTEWATER SYSTEMS EFFLUENT REGULATIONS

1. Members
2. Responsibilities

The Management Committee is responsible for

3. Operation of the Committee
4. Public Communications
5. Meetings

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of three substances in the Fatty Amides Group — 13-docosenamide, (Z)- (erucamide), CAS RN (see footnote 7) 112-84-5; 9-octadecenamide, (Z)- (oleamide), CAS RN 301-02-0; and isooctadecanoic acid, reaction products with tetraethylenepentamine (IODA reaction products with TEPA), CAS RN 68784-17-8 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas erucamide, oleamide and IODA reaction products with TEPA are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on erucamide, oleamide and IODA reaction products with TEPA pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Fatty Amides Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a draft screening assessment of 3 of 12 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Fatty Amides Group. These 3 substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Five of the 12 substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. (see footnote 8) In addition, 4 substances were placed into other substance groups, to which they were more appropriately suited, on the basis of structural features and/or functionalities of toxicological significance. (see footnote 9) Accordingly, this draft screening assessment addresses the 3 substances listed in the table below.

Substances in the Fatty Amides Group

CAS RN (see note a)

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

112-84-5

13-Docosenamide, (Z)-

Erucamide

301-02-0

9-Octadecenamide, (Z)-

Oleamide

68784-17-8 (see note b)

Isooctadecanoic acid, reaction products with tetraethylenepentamine

IODA reaction products with TEPA

Erucamide and oleamide are naturally occurring substances that may be produced in the environment by abiotic processes (e.g. forest fires) or by biota. In 2011, they were not reported to be manufactured in Canada, but were imported for use primarily for the manufacture of plastic products and rubbers. In the same year, between 1 000 000 and 10 000 000 kg of erucamide and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of oleamide were imported into Canada. The presence of erucamide and oleamide in environmental media, food or products may result from natural or anthropogenic sources.

IODA reaction products with TEPA is not naturally occurring. In 2011, IODA reaction products with TEPA was not reported to be manufactured in Canada and between 100 and 1 000 kg of these products were imported into Canada. Uses of IODA reaction products with TEPA in Canada are limited to lubricants and greases, primarily as components in two-cycle marine outboard engine oils. Releases of this substance to the environment from industrial processes and consumer products are expected to be minimal.

The ecological risks of erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA. It is proposed to conclude that erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Erucamide and oleamide exhibit low acute toxicity and are not genotoxic. No adverse effects were noted for erucamide in repeated-dose and developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals, and it is considered to be of low hazard potential. Limited health effects information was available for oleamide, but because erucamide and oleamide are similar with respect to their chemical structure, physical and chemical properties and toxicokinetics, oleamide is similarly expected to be of low hazard potential.

IODA reaction products with TEPA exhibits low acute toxicity and is not genotoxic. No adverse health effects were noted in a short-term repeated-dose toxicity study or in a combined developmental and reproductive toxicity study. IODA reaction products with TEPA are expected to be of low hazard potential.

Considering the low toxicity of erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA, the potential risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Arthrobacter globiformis (A. globiformis) strain ATCC (see footnote 10) 8010 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Arthrobacter globiformis strain ATCC 8010

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Arthrobacter globiformis (A. globiformis) strain ATCC 8010.

A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 is a soil bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species. A. globiformis is nutritionally versatile and reported to be ubiquitous in freshwater, saltwater and soils. The characteristics of A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 make it suitable for use in food production, biocontrol, probiotic use in humans and animals, biodegradation and water and wastewater treatment.

There are no reported adverse effects in terrestrial or aquatic plants, invertebrates or vertebrates, or infections in humans associated with this specific Domestic Substances List strain, or other strains of A. globiformis.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Bacillus circulans (B. circulans) strain ATCC (see footnote 11) 9500 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Bacillus circulans strain ATCC 9500

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on Bacillus circulans (B. circulans) strain ATCC 9500.

B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 is a bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species B. circulans. B. circulans is an endospore-forming bacterium that is present in many environments. It has been isolated from soils and marine water, and is found in association with plants and animals. B. circulans has characteristics that make it suitable for use in aquaculture, bioremediation, biodegradation, water and wastewater treatment, drain cleaning and degreasing and enzyme production.

There has been no adverse effect attributed to B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 in the environment. However, in the context of experimental investigations into their biocontrol potential, some strains of B. circulans have shown pathogenic potential towards some insects and nematodes when directly inoculated with high concentrations. Nonetheless, B. circulans species is not considered a plant or animal pathogen, and in spite of its widespread distribution in the environment, there is no evidence that B. circulans has adversely affected terrestrial invertebrates at the population level.

There have been no human infections attributed to B. circulans strain ATCC 9500, and as a species, B. circulans is not known as a human pathogen. Despite its ubiquity, there have been few case reports of human infection with B. circulans, and these occurred mostly in individuals with pre-existing health conditions. B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 is sensitive to different classes of antibiotics including aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, second-generation fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins that may be used in the unlikely event of infection with this organism.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 is used in consumer and commercial products for biodegradation, drain cleaning and degreasing, septic tank maintenance, as well as waste and wastewater treatment.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that B. circulans strain ATCC 9500 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

[8-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium) strain ATCC (see footnote 12) 14581 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment for Bacillus megaterium strain ATCC 14581

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium) strain ATCC 14581.

B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 is a Gram-positive bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of this species. B. megaterium can be found in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, in association with plants, animals and humans, as a contaminant of foods and in man-made environments. Like other Bacillus species, B. megaterium is able to form thick-walled spores, which can withstand harsh conditions and nutrient depletion. It is also able to form biofilms, allowing it to persist and survive in suboptimal conditions. Various characteristics make B. megaterium suitable for applications in wastewater treatment, bioremediation and biodegradation, cleaning and deodorizing, drain and septic treatment as well as enzyme and chemical production.

B. megaterium can have both beneficial and adverse effects in terrestrial plants. In Canada, B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 is not recognized as a plant pest and has been reported to act as a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium. Although B. megaterium or its secondary metabolites can adversely affect some invertebrate species in the context of experimental investigations into their biocontrol potential, B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 did not cause effects in the terrestrial invertebrate springtail. No effects in aquatic plants, invertebrates or vertebrates or terrestrial vertebrates have been reported in the scientific literature.

In spite of the widespread distribution of B. megaterium in the environment, human infection with B. megaterium is very rarely reported. Adverse human health effects have not been attributed to B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581. Strain ATCC 14581 specified on the Domestic Substances List does not carry enterotoxin genes, which have occasionally been associated with other strains of B. megaterium. Antibiotic susceptibility testing performed by Health Canada scientists demonstrated that, in the unlikely event of infection, clinically relevant antibiotics are effective against this strain.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that 10 000–100 000 kg of products containing B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 were imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008. Reported uses include products or activities in the consumer, commercial and industrial sectors.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that B. megaterium strain ATCC 14581 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Cellulomonas biazotea (C. biazotea) strain ATCC (see footnote 13) 486 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Cellulomonas biazotea strain ATCC 486

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Cellulomonas biazotea (C. biazotea) strain ATCC 486.

C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 is a soil bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species. The characteristics of C. biazotea make it suitable for use in animal feed supplements, fertilizers, biodegradation and biofuel production.

There are no reported adverse effects in terrestrial or aquatic plants, invertebrates or vertebrates, or infections in humans associated with this specific Domestic Substances List strain, or other strains of C. biazotea.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Chaetomium globosum (C. globosum) strain ATCC (see footnote 14) 6205 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Chaetomium globosum strain ATCC 6205

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Chaetomium globosum (C. globosum) strain ATCC 6205.

C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 is a fungus that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species C. globosum. C. globosum is present in many environments. It has been isolated from natural settings such as soil, marine and fresh water, and has been found in association with plants and animals. It is also commonly found on mouldy building materials. C. globosum has properties that are of potential use in biocontrol, plant growth promotion, biodegradation, water and wastewater treatment, drain cleaning and degreasing, and enzyme production.

There have been no adverse environmental effects reported in the scientific literature that could be attributed to C. globosum strain ATCC 6205. Members of the species are known to produce several mycotoxins and bioactive secondary metabolites, some of which are harmful to human cell lines and animals. Mycotoxin testing of C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 indicated that it produces low levels of mycotoxins relative to other C. globosum strains. There are a few reports of C. globosum acting as a pathogen in aquatic and terrestrial plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. In spite of these studies and reports and its widespread distribution in the environment, there is no evidence that C. globosum has adversely affected any terrestrial or aquatic species at the population level.

As a species, C. globosum is not known as a human pathogen. Despite its ubiquity, there have been only a few confirmed cases of systemic human infection with C. globosum, and these occurred in individuals predisposed to infection because of pre-existing health conditions. C. globosum has been implicated in nail and skin infections in otherwise healthy patients, often with a history of recent trauma to nail or skin as a predisposing factor. A number of antifungal agents, including clotrimazole, isoconazole, and terbafine, are effective against C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 and may be used should an infection occur.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including release to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 is used in biodegradation, and research and development.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus) strain ATCC (see footnote 15) 4698 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Micrococcus luteus strain ATCC 4698

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus) strain ATCC 4698.

M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 is a bacterial strain that shares characteristics with other strains of the species. M. luteus belongs to the normal flora of mammalian skin and mucous membranes, and is also widespread in the environment, including in soil, air, dust, water, polar ice, activated sludge, plants, fish, insects and food. It has characteristics that make it suitable for use in bioremediation, biodegradation, wastewater treatment, drain cleaning and degreasing, growth promotion of plants and fish, skin treatment, and the production of enzymes and antibiotics.

There is no conclusive evidence in the scientific literature to suggest that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 is likely to have adverse effects on terrestrial or aquatic plants, vertebrates or invertebrates in the environment. There are a few reports of animal infections attributed to the species M. luteus, which are either too old to verify by using modern identification methods or were polymicrobial with 7–10 other micro-organisms involved. M. luteus was unlikely to be the primary pathogen. Moderate pathogenicity of M. luteus towards an insect pest of hazelnuts was reported under experimental conditions, which are unlikely to occur in nature.

There is no evidence from the scientific literature to suggest that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 is likely to have adverse effects on human health. In humans, M. luteus is generally considered to be a harmless, non-pathogenic, commensal organism, and is rarely isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from damaged tissues. Early Micrococcus infections were diagnosed using methods that did not differentiate Micrococcus from coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, the more likely agent of infection. The few infections attributable to M. luteus were acquired following a medical procedure that could introduce micro-organisms from the skin into sterile body compartments, such as cardiac surgery or use of central venous catheters, often in individuals with debilitating diseases, including cancer or kidney failure. In the unlikely event of infection, M. luteus is susceptible to most antibiotics.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008, except in limited quantities for academic research, teaching, and research and development activities.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that M. luteus strain ATCC 4698 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a living organism — Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) strain ATCC (see footnote 16) 74252 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is concluded that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity provisions under subsection 106(3) thereof apply with respect to this living organism,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) strain ATCC 74252.

T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is a fungus that has characteristics in common with other species of the genus Trichoderma and other strains of the same species. T. reesei, a spore-forming fungus, is able to thrive in soil and on decaying plant matter as a major decomposer of plants, and is thus capable of degrading a variety of plant-based substrates. These properties allow for potential uses of T. reesei in fermentation of plant-based feedstocks, and in production of enzymes and biochemicals used in food, animal feed and in health products. T. reesei is widely considered to be a safe production organism due to its long history of safe use for the production of carbohydrase enzymes such as cellulase.

Trichoderma species including T. reesei are capable of producing metabolites called peptaibols. Some T. reesei strains can produce the peptaibol paracelsin as well as other peptaibols. Paracelsin is reported to be harmful to aquatic invertebrates, to mammalian cells, and to mice in experimental conditions where natural barriers were bypassed. Paracelsin has also been reported to have antibiotic and antifungal activity. Paracelsin and other peptaibols production is not thought to occur under the conditions of industry-standard submerged fermentation in which T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is currently used, but could occur under other growth conditions.

T. reesei as a species is not naturally occurring in Canada. Despite its widespread presence in tropical soils, there are no reports of the species causing adverse effects in aquatic or terrestrial plants or animals in the tropics. In addition, Trichoderma species including T. reesei inhibit various plant pathogens.

There is no evidence in the scientific literature indicating that T. reesei is a human pathogen. T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is unlikely to cause infection in healthy or debilitated humans and is susceptible to major clinical antifungal drugs that could be used for treatment in the unlikely event of infection. Repeated exposure to commercial enzyme preparations produced by T. reesei and other Trichoderma species infrequently causes allergic reactions in humans.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that 10 000–100 000 kg of T. reesei strain ATCC 74252, dry cell mass, were manufactured in Canada in 2008 for industrial uses.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

Considerations for follow-up

Because T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is listed on the Domestic Substances List, its import into and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). Given that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 has the potential to produce paracelsin and other peptaibols, which were reported to be harmful to aquatic invertebrates and to mammalian cells, there is a potential risk to the environment. The production of paracelsin and other peptaibols is not thought to occur under the conditions of industry-standard submerged fermentation in which T. reesei ATCC 74252 is currently used, but could occur under other growth conditions, particularly in the fermentation of solid plant material and insoluble substrates. There is suspicion that new activities (new fermentation conditions) could lead to T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 meeting the criteria set out in paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA. Therefore, the Government of Canada intends to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 112(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 106(3) of the Act apply with respect to this living organism.

A significant new activity can include an activity that is not currently occurring or an existing activity involving a different quantity or concentration, or occurring in different circumstances, that could affect the exposure pattern of the living organism. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person (individual or corporation) to provide, and for the Government to assess, specific information about a living organism when a person proposes to use the living organism in a significant new activity. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health will assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the living organism, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and, if so, whether risk management is required.

The screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointment

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated January 29, 2018

February 16, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Griffin, The Hon. Susan A.

2018-102

Court of Appeal for British Columbia

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Court of Appeal of Yukon

 

Judge

 

MacDonald, Diane

2018-103

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

 

Members

 

Allen, Christine

2018-73

Condon, Anne

2018-76

Déziel, Nancy

2018-78

Dodds, Karen

2018-72

El-Aneed, Anas

2018-75

Fisher, Brian D.

2018-77

Hudson, Zachary

2018-79

Kerr, Jeremy

2018-82

La Rochelle, Sophie

2018-83

McDonald, Tanya

2018-71

Muzyka, Douglas W.

2018-81

Mwaba, Misheck

2018-85

Seetzen, Helge

2018-84

Vessey, J. Kevin

2018-80

Sexton, Richard

2018-104

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

Tennier, Anne Maureen

2018-100

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

 

President

 

February 16, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Senators called

Her Excellency the Governor General has been pleased to summon to the Senate of Canada, by Letters Patent under the Great Seal of Canada, bearing the date of February 15, 2018:

February 16, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

 

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

President

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

February 26, 2018

Director

First Nations Financial Management Board

March 12, 2018

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Parliamentary Librarian

Library of Parliament

 

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal

 

Executive Director

Telefilm Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

 

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

June 29, 2018

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at January 31, 2018

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

15.2

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

8,794.0

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

5.6

 
   

8,799.6

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

17,998.5

 

Government of Canada bonds

83,532.7

 

Other investments

405.5

 
   

101,936.7

Property and equipment

 

567.9

Intangible assets

 

40.3

Other assets

 

134.9

 

111,494.6


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

82,036.9

Deposits

Government of Canada

25,264.1

 

Members of Payments Canada

500.2

 

Other deposits

2,589.7

 
   

28,354.0

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

606.2

   

110,997.1

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

367.5

 
   

497.5

111,494.6

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, February 14, 2018

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, February 14, 2018

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

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