ARCHIVED — Regulations Amending the Citizenship Regulations, 1993

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Vol. 143, No. 8 — April 15, 2009

Registration

SOR/2009-108 April 2, 2009

CITIZENSHIP ACT

P.C. 2009-495 April 2, 2009

Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 27 (see footnote a) of the Citizenship Act (see footnote b), hereby makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Citizenship Regulations, 1993.

REGULATIONS AMENDING THE CITIZENSHIP REGULATIONS, 1993

AMENDMENTS

1. The long title of the Citizenship Regulations, 1993 (see footnote 1) is replaced by the following:

CITIZENSHIP REGULATIONS

2. Section 1 of the Regulations and heading before it are repealed.

3. (1) The definition “citizenship court” in section 2 of the English version of the Regulations is repealed.

(2) The reference to “( citizenship court )” at the end of the definition “bureau de la citoyenneté” in section 2 of the French version of the Regulations is replaced by “(citizenship office)”.

(3) Section 2 of the English version of the Regulations is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

“citizenship office” means a place where a citizenship judge or citizenship officer performs duties under the Act; (bureau de la citoyenneté)

4. (1) Paragraph 3(1)(b) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(b) filed, together with the materials described in subsection (4), with the Registrar.

(2) Subsections 3(2) and (3) of the Regulations are repealed.

(3) The portion of subsection 3(4) of the Regulations before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

(4) For the purposes of subsection (1), the materials required by this section are

(4) Paragraphs 3(4)(b) and (c) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

(b) any document that has been or may be created by the Canadian immigration authorities, or other evidence, that establishes the date on which the applicant was lawfully admitted to Canada for permanent residence;

(c) two photographs of the applicant of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act; and

(d) evidence that establishes that the applicant has, within the four years immediately preceding the date of his or her application, accumulated at least three years of residence in Canada.

(5) Subsection 3(5) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(5) The Registrar shall without delay forward each application and materials filed with the Registrar to a citizenship officer of the citizenship office that the Registrar considers appropriate in the circumstances.

5. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 3:

3.1 (1) Subject to subsection (2), an application made under subsection 5(5) of the Act shall be made in the prescribed form and filed with the Registrar together with the following materials:

(a) a birth certificate or, if unobtainable, other evidence that establishes the date and place of birth of the person in respect of whom the application is made;

(b) evidence that establishes that a birth parent of the person was a Canadian citizen at the time of the person’s birth;

(c) two photographs of the person, of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act;

(d) evidence that establishes that the person has resided in Canada for at least three years during the four years immediately before the date of his or her application; and

(e) evidence that establishes that the person has always been stateless.

(2) An application referred to in subsection (1) that is made in respect of a minor child shall comply with the requirements of paragraphs 4(1)(a) and (b) and be made in the prescribed form and filed with the Registrar together with the materials described in subsection (1) and paragraphs 4(2)(c) and (e).

6. (1) The portion of subsection 4(1) of the Regulations before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

4. (1) An application made under subsection 5(2) of the Act on behalf of a minor child shall be

(2) Paragraph 4(2)(d) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(d) any document that has been or may be created by the Canadian immigration authorities, or other evidence, that establishes the date on which the minor child was lawfully admitted to Canada for permanent residence;

(3) Paragraph 4(2)(f) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(f) two photographs of the minor child of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

7. Section 5 of the Regulations is repealed.

8. (1) Paragraphs 5.1(2)(e) and (f) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

(e) evidence that establishes that the adoption took place on or after January 1, 1947 and while the person was a minor; and

(f) two photographs of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

(2) Subparagraph 5.1(3)(a)(i) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(i) a competent authority of the province in which the citizen resided at the time of the adoption has stated in writing that it does not object to the adoption, and

9. (1) Paragraphs 5.2(2)(c) and (d) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

(c) evidence that establishes that the adoption took place on or after January 1, 1947 and while the person was a minor; and

(d) two photographs of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

(2) Subparagraph 5.2(3)(a)(i) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(i) a competent authority of the province in which the citizen resided at the time of the adoption has stated in writing that it does not object to the adoption, and

10. (1) Paragraphs 5.3(2)(c) and (d) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(c) evidence that establishes that the adoption took place on or after January 1, 1947 and while the person was 18 years of age or older; and

(d) two photographs of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

(2) Subparagraph 5.3(3)(a)(i) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(i) a competent authority of the province in which the citizen resided at the time of the adoption has stated in writing that it does not object to the adoption, and

11. Paragraphs 5.4(2)(e) and (f) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

(e) evidence that establishes that the decision that was made abroad in respect of the adoption took place on or after January 1, 1947; and

(f) two photographs of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

12. (1) Subparagraph 5.5(2)(b)(i) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(i) the decision that was made abroad in respect of the adoption took place on or after January 1, 1947, and

(2) Paragraph 5.5(2)(c) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(c) two photographs of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

13. Section 6 of the Regulations and the heading before it are repealed.

14. (1) The portion of subsection 7(1) of the Regulations before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

7. (1) An application made under subsection 9(1) of the Act, other than an application referred to in section 7.1, shall be

(2) Paragraph 7(3)(c) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(c) a photograph of the applicant of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act;

15. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 7:

7.1 (1) An application to renounce the citizenship conferred by the Act on a person referred to in paragraph 3(1)(f) or (g) of the Act shall be

(a) made to the Minister in the prescribed form; and

(b) filed with the Registrar together with the following materials:

(i) a birth certificate or other evidence that establishes the person’s date and place of birth,

(ii) evidence that establishes that the person is a person referred to in paragraph 3(1)(f) or (g) of the Act,

(iii) a photograph of the person of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act, and

(iv) an official document of a country other than Canada, or other evidence, that establishes that the person is or will become a citizen of that country if the application is approved.

(2) The Minister shall approve an application made under subsection (1) if the person

(a) is a citizen of a country other than Canada or will become a citizen of a country other than Canada if the application is approved; and

(b) is not prevented from understanding the significance of renouncing citizenship by reason of the person having a mental disability.

(3) The Minister may waive on compassionate grounds the requirement of paragraph (2)(b).

(4) If an application for renunciation is approved, the Minister shall issue to the person a document attesting to the renunciation.

16. (1) Paragraph 8(1)(b) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(b) if the application is made by a minor child, countersigned by a person who is authorized by paragraph 4(1)(a) to make an application under subsection 5(2) of the Act; and

(2) Paragraph 8(2)(b) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(b) two photographs of the applicant of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act;

(3) Paragraph 8(2)(d) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(d) any document that has been or may be created by the Canadian immigration authorities, or other evidence, that establishes the date on which the applicant was lawfully admitted to Canada for permanent residence;

(4) Subsection 8(2) of the Regulations is amended by striking out “and” at the end of paragraph (d), by adding “and” at the end of paragraph (e) and by adding the following after that paragraph:

(f) evidence that establishes that the applicant has resided in Canada for at least one year immediately before the date of his or her application.

17. Subparagraph 10(b)(ii) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(ii) two photographs of the applicant of the size and type shown on a form prescribed under section 28 of the Act.

18. Subsections 11(1) to (8) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

11. (1) On receipt of an application made in accordance with subsection 3(1), 3.1(1), 7(1) or 8(1), the Registrar shall cause to be commenced the inquiries necessary to determine whether the person in respect of whom the application is made meets the requirements of the Act and these Regulations with respect to the application.

(2) If a person who makes an application referred to in subsection 3(1) fails to provide the materials described in subsection 3(4), the citizenship officer to whom the application has been forwarded shall send a notice in writing by mail to the person, at their latest known address, advising that the person is required to provide the materials to that citizenship officer by the date specified in the notice.

(3) If a person who makes an application referred to in subsection 3.1(1), 7(1) or 8(1) fails to provide the materials described in subsections 3.1(1), 7(3) or 8(2), as the case may be, the Registrar shall send a notice in writing by mail to the person, at their latest known address, advising that the person is required to provide the materials to the Registrar by the date specified in the notice.

(4) If a person, other than a person who makes an application referred to in subsection 3.1(1), fails to comply with a notice sent under subsection (2) or (3), the citizenship officer or the Registrar, as the case may be, shall send a second notice in writing by mail to the person, at their latest known address, advising that the person is required to provide the materials described in subsection 3(4), 7(3) or 8(2), as the case may be, to the Registrar or to the citizenship officer, as the case may be, by the date specified in the notice.

(5) After completion of the inquiries commenced under subsection (1), the Registrar shall

(a) in the case of an application and materials filed in accordance with subsection 3(1), request the citizenship officer to whom the application and materials have been forwarded to refer the application and materials to a citizenship judge for consideration; and

(b) in the case of an application and materials filed under subsection 3.1(1), 7(1) or 8(1), forward the application and materials to a citizenship officer of the citizenship office that the Registrar considers appropriate in the circumstances, and request the citizenship officer to refer the application and materials to a citizenship judge for consideration.

(6) A citizenship officer to whom an application and materials have been forwarded under subsection 3(5) or paragraph 11(5)(b) shall enter in the records of the citizenship office the date on which the Registrar received the application and materials.

(7) If it appears to a citizenship judge that the approval of an application referred to the citizenship judge under subsection (5) may not be possible on the basis of the information available, that citizenship judge shall ask the Minister to send a notice in writing by mail to the applicant, at the applicant’s latest known address, giving the applicant an opportunity to appear in person before that citizenship judge at the date, time and place specified in the notice.

(8) If an applicant referred to in subsection (7) fails to appear in person at the specified date, time and place, the Minister shall give the applicant at least seven days’ notice in writing by mail, at the applicant’s latest known address, advising that the applicant may appear in person before the citizenship judge at the new date, time and place specified in the notice.

19. Section 16 of the Regulations and the heading before it are repealed.

20. Section 18 of the Regulations and the heading before it are repealed.

21. Subsection 19(3) of the English version of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(3) If a person is to take the oath of citizenship at a citizenship ceremony, a certificate of citizenship shall be forwarded by the Registrar to a citizenship officer of the appropriate citizenship office, who shall notify the person of the date, time and place at which the person is to appear before the citizenship judge to take the oath of citizenship and receive the person’s certificate of citizenship.

22. Paragraph 20(2)(a) of the English version of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

(a) a citizenship officer of the citizenship office that the Registrar considers appropriate in the circumstances, if the oath is to be taken in Canada; or

23. Section 30 of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

30. If a foreign service officer receives an application referred to in subsection 4(1) or 7(1), or a notice given under subsection 9(1), the foreign service officer shall note the date of its receipt and retain a copy of it in a file to be kept for that purpose.

24. Paragraphs (c) and (d) in Item 1 of the schedule to the Regulations are repealed.

COMING INTO FORCE

25. These Regulations come into force on April 17, 2009.

REGULATORY IMPACT
ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

Executive summary

Issue: On April 17, 2008, Bill C-37 (An Act to amend the Citizenship Act) received royal assent. It comes into effect on April 17, 2009. These amendments to the Citizenship Regulations, 1993 are a key component of Bill C-37’s implementation. The purpose of Bill C-37 and of the Regulations is to address issues of loss of citizenship, which were typified recently by “lost Canadians,” persons who either ceased to be, or never were, citizens due to outdated provisions in existing and previous legislation. In many cases, “lost Canadians” were not aware that they were not Canadian citizens until they applied for a certificate of Canadian citizenship or other documentation. The Regulations provide the technical and procedural requirements necessary to initiate applications for a grant or a renunciation of citizenship.

Description: The Regulations include three new items enabled by Bill C-37: an extension of eligibility for grants of citizenship to persons adopted by a Canadian parent between January 1, 1947, and February 14, 1977; requirements for a new citizenship grant process for a stateless person; and a streamlined renunciation process for persons who wish to renounce the automatic conferral of Canadian citizenship under Bill C-37. The Regulations also include technical changes to accommodate Bill C-37 and to harmonize language of the current Regulations with the new Act’s objectives.

Cost-benefit statement: The Regulations support the objectives of Bill C-37 to confer Canadian citizenship upon certain individuals who lost it and to others who will be recognized as citizens for the first time. The Regulations also mitigate the impact of these changes by providing a new renunciation process for those who do not wish to automatically gain citizenship and by providing a citizenship grant process for persons who are stateless due to Bill C-37′s limit of citizenship to the first generation born abroad. It is anticipated that these amendments will address the majority of persons who either lost their citizenship or who never had it due to outdated legislative provisions.

Domestic and international coordination and cooperation: The Regulations are consistent with Canada’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness.

Performance measurement and evaluation plan: A National Quality Assurance Program is in place to ensure the reliability of the information provided by applicants and the quality of citizenship decision making by officials.

Issue

On April 17, 2008, Bill C-37 (An Act to amend the Citizenship Act), received royal assent. It comes into effect on April 17, 2009. These amendments to the Citizenship Regulations, 1993 are intended to reflect the policy objectives enabled by Bill C-37. This Bill addresses issues of loss of citizenship, typified recently by so-called “lost Canadians,” persons who either ceased to be, or never were, citizens due to outdated provisions in existing and previous legislation. In many cases, “lost Canadians” were not aware that they were not Canadian citizens until they applied for a certificate of Canadian citizenship or other documentation. The Regulations provide the technical and procedural requirements necessary to initiate applications for a grant of citizenship.

Description

On December 10, 2007, the Government introduced Bill C-37, An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act, as a broad remedial measure to address loss of citizenship issues. Many persons had lost or never had Canadian citizenship as a result of outdated provisions in existing and former citizenship legislation. Bill C-37 received royal assent on April 17, 2008, and will come into effect on April 17, 2009, no later than a year following royal assent. It is important to note that persons who are Canadian citizens when these changes come into force will remain Canadian citizens.

Bill C-37 promotes citizenship stability, simplicity and consistency while also protecting the value of citizenship by ensuring that future Canadians have a real connection with Canada. It resolves long-standing citizenship concerns resulting from outdated provisions, and preserves the historic significance of January 1, 1947, as the date the legal status of Canadian citizen was created.

Specifically, Bill C-37 will restore or give citizenship to

  • persons who became citizens on or after January 1, 1947 (including those born in Canada prior to 1947 and war brides), who then lost citizenship, and
  • persons born to a Canadian citizen abroad on or after January 1, 1947, if not already citizens, if they are the first generation born abroad.

The exceptions are those who renounced their citizenship, as an adult, with Canadian authorities, those born in Canada to a foreign diplomat, or those whose citizenship was revoked by the government because it was obtained by fraud, by false representation or by concealing material circumstances.

Bill C-37 also extends the rules that came into effect in December 2007, which allowed those born outside Canada, and adopted by a Canadian parent after February 14, 1977, to become Canadian citizens without having first to become permanent residents. Under Bill C-37, persons adopted between January 1, 1947, and February 15, 1977, will also be eligible to apply for citizenship under the provisions for adopted persons.

In addition to recognizing citizens, the Bill also protects the value of Canadian citizenship for the future. After Bill C-37 comes into force in 2009, individuals born outside Canada to a parent who was a Canadian citizen at the time of their birth will only be Canadians at birth if

  • the parent was born in Canada; or
  • the parent immigrated to Canada and became a Canadian citizen.

This means that a child born in another country after the new law comes into effect will not be a Canadian citizen by birth if he/she was born outside Canada to a Canadian parent who was also born outside Canada to a Canadian parent.

The aforementioned limitation will also apply to foreign-born persons adopted by a Canadian parent. Once granted citizenship under provisions in the Act for adopted children, foreign-born adopted children of Canadian citizens will be considered to be the first generation born abroad. An exception to this change exists for children in the second (or further) generation born abroad to, or adopted abroad by, Canadian citizens who are employed outside Canada by the Canadian Forces, the federal public service, or the public service of a province.

Persons born to Canadian citizens after Bill C-37 comes into force in the second (or further) generation abroad may apply to be sponsored as members of the family class under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Once they are granted permanent resident status, they may immediately apply for citizenship if they are under the age of 18.

Since a person born to a Canadian citizen abroad (after C-37 comes into force) will not receive citizenship if born in the second (or further) generation abroad, but may also not have foreign status and therefore be stateless, C-37 contains a provision for a grant of citizenship to persons in this situation who have always been stateless. To be eligible for this grant of citizenship, these persons will have to meet requirements set out in C-37, including that they were born outside Canada, that they have always been stateless, that a birth parent was a Canadian citizen at the time of their birth and that they have resided in Canada for at least three years during the four years immediately before the date of their application.

Bill C-37 also contains provisions enabling regulations to

  • develop documentary requirements for the new grant of citizenship (outlined in the Bill) for persons born abroad to a Canadian parent in the second or subsequent generation who are, and who have always been, stateless;
  • expand the eligibility of adopted persons applying for a grant of citizenship to include persons adopted between January 1, 1947, and February 15, 1977; and
  • develop a new streamlined renunciation process to allow persons who obtain citizenship automatically under the new Act and who were born prior to February 15, 1977, to renounce it if they wish.

What will the Regulations do?

Bill C-37 builds on Bill C-14 (An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act [adoption], S.C. 2007, c. 24.) by allowing persons adopted on or after January 1, 1947, to apply for a grant of citizenship. Accordingly, the Regulations will be amended by setting out requirements for a grant of citizenship to those in this category.

The Regulations will support Bill C-37 through the repeal of sections that will no longer be relevant, including requirements concerning retention of citizenship by those born abroad in the second and subsequent generation, and criteria to determine whether a person has a substantial connection to Canada. These sections would no longer be relevant since the provisions in the Act to which they pertain will be repealed by Bill C-37.

The Regulations will outline the grant application requirements for persons born abroad to a Canadian parent in the second or subsequent generation who are, and who have always been, stateless.

The Regulations will outline the requirements for persons applying to renounce the conferral of citizenship acquired under Bill C-37. This streamlined renunciation process is available, at no fee, only to persons born before February 15, 1977, whose citizenship is restored or acquired under Bill C-37 who wish not to be Canadian citizens. Provisions for a streamlined renunciation process are intended to reduce potential hardship to persons whose current foreign citizenship may be negatively affected by the automatic acquisition of Canadian citizenship under Bill C-37. Any person, including persons who do not qualify for the new renunciation process, may apply to renounce his/her citizenship under the current renunciation program described in section 9 of the Citizenship Act.

The Regulations will also be technically modified, apart from their changes to support Bill C-37, to be contemporized in terms of terminology and minor requirements. For example, terminology will be updated to accurately refer to terminology of the Immigration Refugee Protection Act and regulations, and to amend references to methods of mailing to allow for alternative means of secure mail. In addition, in terms of minor changes to requirements, the requirement for citizenship grant applicants to sign photos will be removed and addressed in administrative policy to allow flexibility for new technology supporting on-line applications.

Regulatory and non-regulatory options considered

There is no alternative to regulating in the areas concerned. As a result of Bill C-37, the current Citizenship Regulations, 1993 need to be amended.

Benefits and costs

Bill C-37 will allow for many former Canadians to reacquire citizenship without having to make any application. It is anticipated that these amendments will contend with the majority of cases where persons either lost citizenship or never acquired it due to outdated legislative provisions.

The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has received applications for proof of citizenship from persons whose citizenship may be in question and who consequently may benefit from Bill C-37. Although it is difficult to predict whether the number of applications will continue to remain constant, it is anticipated that Bill C-37 may generate a potential initial spike of applications.

More broadly, Bill C-37 changes will impact a wide range of persons living in Canada and abroad (including certain persons in the first generation born abroad to and foreign-born persons adopted by at least one Canadian parent) who currently do not have Canadian citizenship. Although there is no accurate way to predict how many will be affected, the number of persons who may benefit by having Canadian citizenship restored or granted by Bill C-37 may be high. The Regulations are intended to support the implementation of Bill C-37 by mitigating the impact of these changes through a simplified renunciation process for those who do not wish to gain citizenship or have it restored, and by providing a citizenship grant process for persons in cases of statelessness.

Service standards

Since many of those affected by Bill C-37 are likely residing outside Canada, it is not possible to accurately estimate either the number of persons, or how many of those will come forward to apply for Canadian services (e.g. those who may apply for proof of citizenship). The potential increased number of persons applying for citizenship services as a result of Bill C-37 will be absorbed by current resources. As a result, a spike in receipt of applications will add to current processing pressures. The current average processing times for proof of citizenship applications is ten months. Rising demand for citizenship services outstrips CIC’s current processing capacity such that inventories and processing times are rising. However, CIC will endeavour to maintain, and if possible improve, on the current average processing time.

Consultation

Bill C-37 took into consideration perspectives regarding changes to the legislation received from the House Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration; the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology; and groups representing the interests of persons affected by Bill C-37, including the Lost Canadians Organization, the Mennonite Central Committee of Canada, and the Canadian War Brides. These groups were supportive of policy changes expressed in the Bill and appeared before Parliament to recommend its passage.

During preparations for Bill C-37, CIC consulted widely with other government departments, including the Department of Justice, the Department of Foreign Affairs, Passport Canada, National Defence, Canadian Heritage, and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, which were supportive of the initiative and did not propose changes to the Bill.

The Department of Citizenship and Immigration will undertake a proactive, Web-based outreach to connect with stakeholders and members of the groups affected by the new law. The Department will also reach out to those affected who may not have Internet access, through CIC, partner department channels. For example, the Department of Citizenship and Immigration is exploring ways of reaching out to Canadian expatriate communities in order to spread the message on C-37.

The proposed Regulations were pre-published on December 13, 2008, for 30 days, for public comment. During this period, which ended on January 11, 2009, Citizenship and Immigration Canada consulted with stakeholders on the Regulations, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Passport Canada, National Defence, Canadian Heritage, and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Information on the Regulations was sent to, and a teleconference was held with, the provinces and territories. Non-governmental organizations and individuals were also advised of the pre-publication of the proposed Regulations and were invited to make comments during the public comment period.

Most comments received were with regard to the amendments to the Citizenship Act, rather than the proposed Regulations.

A small number of individual comments were received during the pre-publication period. The majority of these were individual case-related questions concerning the new Act, to be implemented on April 17, 2009, rather than comments on the proposed Regulations. These included seeking information on when the changes would take effect and confer citizenship and when an application for a proof of citizenship could be submitted.

Comments were received from individuals and groups expressing concern regarding the first generation born abroad limit to citizenship by descent, and its impact on children born abroad who are adopted by Canadians. The amendments to the Citizenship Act, not the Regulations, provide that these same rules apply equally to Canadian children born outside Canada to a Canadian parent, and to children who are born abroad and adopted by Canadians.

A further comment was received during the prepublication period expressing concern that the amendments to the Act do not address the citizenship of some persons born abroad before 1947. The amendments to the Act do not confer citizenship to a person who was born before 1947 and who did not become a citizen on January 1, 1947 when the Canadian Citizenship Act came into force.

A comment on the definition of “parent” in the Regulations, was raised by an individual who suggested that the definition be modified to reflect changes to notions of parentage in C-37. The proposed Regulations were developed to include only those changes required by C-37, and a few technical amendments, in order to meet the legislated timeline to implement C-37. As changing the definition of “parent” in the Regulations was not required by C-37, there is no need to amend the definition in the Regulations at this time.

Compliance and enforcement

The regulatory amendments will be implemented in the context of the coming into force of Bill C-37, which will occur on April 17, 2009.

A National Quality Assurance Program (NQAP) is in place to ensure the reliability of the information provided by applicants and the quality of citizenship decision making by officials. Under the program, a number of applicants randomly selected are asked by citizenship officers to attend an interview to clarify any information respecting their application and to produce original documents. In addition, to maintain a high standard of decision making, a sample of processed applications is regularly reviewed.

Contact

Andrew Griffith
Director General
Citizenship and Multiculturalism Branch
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
300 Slater Street, 5th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 1L1
Telephone: 613-948-8600
Fax: 613-954-9144
Email: Andrew.Griffith@cic.gc.ca

Footnote a
S.C. 2007, c. 24, s. 3

Footnote b
R.S., c. C-29

Footnote 1
SOR/93-246