ARCHIVED — Regulations Amending the Wildlife Area Regulations

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Vol. 144, No. 13 — June 23, 2010

Registration

SOR/2010-118 June 3, 2010

CANADA WILDLIFE ACT

P.C. 2010-705 June 3, 2010

Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 12 (see footnote a) of the Canada Wildlife Act (see footnote b), hereby makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Wildlife Area Regulations.

REGULATIONS AMENDING THE WILDLIFE
AREA REGULATIONS

AMENDMENT

1. Schedule I to the Wildlife Area Regulations (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following after Part X:

PART XI — NUNAVUT

1. Akpait National Wildlife Area

All latitudes and longitudes hereinafter are referred to the North American Datum of 1983, Canadian Spatial Reference System (NAD83(CSRS)); all topographic features hereinafter are according to Edition 3 of the National Topographic System Map 16L and 16K (Cape Dyer) produced at a scale of 1:250,000 by the Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources at Ottawa;

In Nunavut;

On Baffin Island and in Davis Strait;

All that parcel in the vicinity of Akpait Fiord, including all land, water and islands and being more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at a point located in Davis Strait, said point having a latitude of 67°08′00″ N and a longitude of 61°51′00″ W;

Thence easterly in Davis Strait along the parallel of latitude 67°08′00″ N to the intersection of the 12 nautical mile territorial sea at approximate longitude 61°29′06″ W;

Thence generally southeasterly in Davis Strait along the limit of the 12 nautical mile territorial sea to the intersection of longitude 61°15′00″ W at approximate latitude 67°00′35″ N;

Thence southerly in Davis Strait along the line of longitude 61°15′00″ W to the intersection of latitude 66°52′00″ N;

Thence southwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 66°48′00″ N and longitude 61°20′00″ W;

Thence northwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 66°50′30″ N and longitude 61°35′00″ W;

Thence westerly in Davis Strait along the parallel of latitude 66°50′30″ N to the intersection of the ordinary high water mark of Davis Strait at approximate longitude 61°36′41″ W;

Thence generally northerly, westerly and southwesterly along the ordinary high water mark of Davis Strait and an unnamed bay to its most southerly point at approximate latitude 66°51′17″ N and approximate longitude 61°47′29″ W;

Thence westerly on Baffin Island along the parallel of latitude 66°51′17″ N to the intersection of longitude 61°51′00″ W;

Thence north on Baffin Island and across Akpait Fiord along the line of longitude 61°51′00″ W to the intersection of the ordinary high water mark on the northern side of Akpait Fiord at approximate latitude 66°53′55″ N;

Thence generally easterly along the ordinary high water mark on the northern side of Akpait Fiord to the intersection of longitude 61°49′00″ W at approximate latitude 66°53′43″ N;

Thence northerly on Baffin Island along the line of longitude 61°49′00″ W to the intersection of the ordinary high water mark on the southeasterly side of Akpat Bay at approximate latitude 66°56′21″ N;

Thence generally southerly and northerly along the ordinary high water mark of Akpat Bay and Davis Strait to the intersection of longitude 61°51′00″ W at approximate latitude 66°58′17″ N;

Thence northerly in Davis Strait along the line of longitude 61°51′00″ W to the point of commencement;

Said parcel containing an area of approximately 774 square kilometres.

2. Ninginganiq National Wildlife Area

All latitudes and longitudes hereinafter are referred to the North American Datum of 1983, Canadian Spatial Reference System (NAD83(CSRS)); all topographic features hereinafter are according to Edition 3 of the National Topographic System Map 27C (McBeth Fiord), produced at a scale of 1:250,000 by the Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources at Ottawa and Edition 2 of the National Topographic Series Map 27D (Cape Henry Kater), produced at a scale of 1:250,000 by the Canada Centre for Mapping, Natural Resources Canada at Ottawa;

In Nunavut;

On Baffin Island and Davis Strait;

All that parcel in the vicinity of Isabella Bay, including all land, water and islands and being more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at a point on Baffin Island, said point being to the northwest of Cape Raper and having a latitude of 69°50′00″ N and a longitude of 67°13′16.87″ W;

Thence easterly on Baffin Island and in Davis Strait along the parallel of latitude 69°50′00″ N to the intersection of the 12 nautical mile territorial sea at approximate longitude 66°36′03″ W;

Thence generally southeasterly in Davis Strait along the limit of the 12 nautical mile territorial sea to the intersection of latitude 69°17′00″ N at approximate longitude 66°07′13″ W;

Thence westerly in Davis Strait and on Baffin Island along the parallel of latitude 69°17′00″ N to the intersection of longitude 66°44′03.04″ W;

Thence northwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°20′20.42″ N and longitude 66°49′02.63″ W;

Thence northwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°24′15.05″ N and longitude 67°03′31.74″ W;

Thence northwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°27′35.80″ N and longitude 67°14′46.48″ W;

Thence westerly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°27′44.66″ N and longitude 67°26′53.39″ W;

Thence westerly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°28′44.21″ N and longitude 67°43′08.79″ W;

Thence southwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°27′00.18″ N and longitude 67°54′05.06″ W;

Thence northwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°27′47.29″ N and longitude 68°02′51.73″ W;

Thence northwesterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°34′43.78″ N and longitude 68°40′00″ W;

Thence north on Baffin Island, across McBeth Fiord and on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°39′27.57″ N and longitude 68°40′00″ W;

Thence southeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°38′27.38″ N and longitude 68°26′10.99″ W;

Thence northeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°39′07.15″ N and longitude 68°19′00.43″ W;

Thence northeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°43′25.24″ N and longitude 68°12′50.42″ W;

Thence northeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°46′39.12″ N and longitude 68°05′41.79″ W;

Thence northeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°47′32.06″ N and longitude 67°53′42.01″ W;

Thence easterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°47′16.38″ N and longitude 67°45′05.69″ W;

Thence southeasterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°44′05.59″ N and longitude 67°26′41.32″ W;

Thence easterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°44′03.59″ N and longitude 67°16′12.67″ W;

Thence easterly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 69°44′36.52″ N and longitude 67°10′33.68″ W;

Thence northerly on Baffin Island along a geodesic line to the point of commencement;

Said parcel containing an area of approximately 3362 square kilometres.

3. Qaqulluit National Wildlife Area

All latitudes and longitudes hereinafter are referred to the North American Datum of 1983, Canadian Spatial Reference System (NAD83(CSRS)); all topographic features hereinafter are according to Edition 3 of the National Topographic System Map 16M and 16N (Padloping Island) produced at a scale of 1:250,000 by the Canada Centre for Mapping, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources at Ottawa;

In Nunavut;

On Qaqaluit Island and in Davis Strait;

All that parcel in the vicinity of Qaqaluit Island, including all land, water and islands and being more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at a point located to the northwest of Qaqaluit Island in Davis Strait, said point having a latitude of 67°17′13.53″ N and a longitude of 62°47′28.04″ W;

Thence northeasterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°21′05.00″ N and longitude 62°37′07.13″ W;

Thence easterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°21′40.56″ N and longitude 62°22′47.50″ W;

Thence southeasterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°18′24.40″ N and longitude 62°11′09.29″ W;

Thence southerly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°13′05.16″ N and longitude 62°07′02.76″ W;

Thence southwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°08′01.14″ N and longitude 62°12′15.74″ W;

Thence northwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°10′31.73″ N and longitude 62°21′46.00″ W;

Thence northerly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°11′35.41″ N and longitude 62°21′58.76″ W;

Thence northwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°12′15.21″ N and longitude 62°23′25.39″ W;

Thence northwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°12′38.43″ N and longitude 62°25′04.87″ W;

Thence southwesterly in Davis Strait along a geodesic line to a point at latitude 67°11′38.90″ N and longitude 62°26′01.70″ W;

Thence northwesterly in Davis Strait and across Qaqaluit Island along a geodesic line to the point of commencement;

Said parcel containing an area of approximately 398 square kilometres.

COMING INTO FORCE

2. These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are registered.

REGULATORY IMPACT
ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

Executive summary

Issue: Creation of three new National Wildlife Areas (NWAs) in Nunavut: Ninginganiq, Akpait and Qaqulluit.

Description: NWAs are established under the Canada Wildlife Act (CWA) and are protected by the Wildlife Area Regulations, which set out prohibited activities in NWAs. Exceptions to the prohibitions are possible should a permit be issued to allow the activity to occur.

As part of the Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA) for NWAs and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries (MBSs) in the Nunavut Settlement Area (2008), which was made under the authority of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement (NLCA), the Government of Canada has committed to taking the necessary steps to establish three new NWAs in Nunavut on the coast of Baffin Island: Ninginganiq, Akpait and Qaqulluit.

Cost-benefit statement: The creation of these three NWAs, which cover an area of 4 534 km2, provides an opportunity to protect unique and important wildlife species — such as bowhead whales, polar bears, walruses and several species of seals and seabirds — and their habitat.

The Government of Canada provided the Inuit, through Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, with $5.6 million in contribution funding. In addition, Environment Canada (EC) receives approximately $2 million over six years starting in 2008–09 for direct support of the Inuit in IIBA work. This funding goes to Inuit organizations and is for the establishment and operations of the area co-management committees, the hiring of Inuit students and other activities.

The NWAs will encourage alternative, environmentally appropriate economic development, such as ecotourism, which will help to diversify the local and regional Inuit economies, confirm the ecotourism value of NWAs and assist Inuit in adapting to evolving socio-economic conditions.

Domestic and international coordination and cooperation: The regulatory initiative will assist in meeting Canada’s commitments under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, ratified by Canada on December 4, 1992, whose main obligation consists of the conservation of biological diversity.

Performance measurement and evaluation plan: The performance measurement and evaluation plan for this regulatory initiative is part of the requirements of the IIBA. The IIBA requires annual reviews of the implementation of the agreement, which is summarized in Environment Canada’s departmental performance report and within the annual reporting of the NLCA’s implementation coordinated by the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. A five-year review is also required in order to ensure that the related objectives of the NLCA and the IIBA are being met. Finally, an outcome evaluation of the agreement is planned for the 2012–13 fiscal year. The evaluation issues will include success, cost-effectiveness, governance and design and delivery.

Issue

These amendments to Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations under the CWA will create three new NWAs in Nunavut — Ninginganiq, Akpait and Qaqulluit — to protect wildlife and/or wildlife habitat for the purposes of conservation, research and/or interpretation.

Objectives

Protection of wildlife and wildlife habitat for the purposes of conservation, research and/or interpretation.

Description

NWAs are established and protected under the CWA. To be considered for designation, a site must contain nationally significant habitat for migratory birds, must support wildlife or ecosystems at risk, or must represent rare or unusual wildlife habitat. Once an area has been designated as a NWA, natural features integral to the site are protected by the Act’s Wildlife Area Regulations. These Regulations set out prohibited activities in NWAs and a process for issuing permits that would authorize a person to carry out activities that are considered prohibited under the regulations.

As part of the IIBA for NWAs and MBSs in the Nunavut Settlement Area (2008), three new NWAs on the coast of Baffin Island were identified: Ninginganiq, Akpait and Qaqulluit. The IIBA was agreed to between the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area (2008), the Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Kitikmeot Inuit Association, the Kivalliq Inuit Association, the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, the Nangmautaq Hunters and Trappers Organization and the Government of Canada under the authority of the NLCA. (see footnote 2) The three NWAs, comprising 4 534 km2, provide an opportunity to protect unique and important wildlife species and their habitat.

As required by the NLCA and the IIBA, area co-management committees (ACMCs) will be established for NWAs to advise the Minister on all aspects of the planning and management of NWAs, including preparing, amending and recommending management plans.

The management plans, which will be made available to the public, will describe the purposes of the NWAs, management goals and objectives, the natural and cultural resources of the area, policies that will guide the management of the NWAs and a schedule to implement the management plan. As specified in the IIBA, the plans will also identify areas in and around the NWAs used by Inuit and those used by visitors, the Inuit-owned lands that fall within the NWAs and the mechanisms to minimize incompatibility between visitor activities and Inuit use and enjoyment of NWAs. Specific Inuit rights and uses of the NWAs have been clearly defined under the IIBA and the NLCA.

The following provides a detailed description of each of the NWAs to be added to Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations.

Ninginganiq (see footnote 3) NWA (Isabella Bay) — 336 200 hectares

The Ninginganiq NWA is 120 km south of Clyde River, on the north-east coast of Baffin Island, and includes the shoreline and islands of Isabella Bay and adjacent ocean out to 12 nautical miles from shore. The Inuktitut word “Ninginganiq” translates roughly as “the place where fog sits.”

The interplay of ocean and wind currents with the shallow banks off the coast of Isabella Bay, deep troughs further offshore, ocean and wind currents, creates ideal habitat for bowhead whales. The marine habitat in this NWA is considered essential to the recovery of the species. Up to 100 bowheads have been recorded at one time in Isabella Bay, making this the single largest known concentration for this species anywhere in Canada.

While some of the population, including cows and calves, move westward through Lancaster Sound in late June and early July, others, mainly adults and large adolescents, remain off the east coast of Baffin Island for the summer and fall. The Ninginganiq NWA also supports healthy populations of polar bears, ringed seals, king eiders, long-tailed duck, dovekies, northern fulmars, halibut, ringed seals and narwhal.

Akpait (see footnote 4) NWA — 77 400 hectares

The Akpait (the Inuktitut word for “murres”) NWA is situated approximately 130 km southeast of Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island) and 37 km northeast of Cape Dyer, on the northeastern tip of the Cumberland Peninsula of Baffin Island. It is a promontory overlooking Akpait Fiord. The land is divided into steep cliffs that rise dramatically to 915 meters above sea level with a complex series of steep rock pinnacles and ridges bordered by a high talus slope and beach.

The Akpait NWA supports numerous seabirds, including one of Canada’s largest thick-billed murre colonies, estimated at 133 000 pairs. Northern fulmars also occupy about 20 000 breeding sites here. About 1 200 pairs of black-legged kittiwakes, glaucous gulls and black guillemots also breed at Akpait. Polar bears, walruses and several seal species also frequent the marine portion of the NWA.

Qaqulluit (see footnote 5) NWA — 39 800 hectares

The Qaqulluit NWA is located on the north-eastern tip of Qaqaluit, a small island off the eastern coast of Baffin Island approximately 100 km southeast of Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island) and just north of the Cumberland Peninsula. Qaqulluit (the Inuktitut word for “fulmar seabirds”) is close to the former community of Padloping Island (a U.S. Coast Guard Station) and the Distant Early Warning (DEW line) site on Durban Island. There are several archaeological sites on Qaqaluit Island. Qaqulluit showcases two rock towers, orange with lichen and topped with grassy plant life, that rise 430 meters above the ocean.

The island is home to Canada’s largest breeding colony of northern fulmars, representing an estimated 22% of the total Canadian population. Nesting seabirds are sensitive to disturbance and the pollution of their feeding areas. Healthy populations of marine mammals, including the walrus and ringed seal, use the waters of this NWA.

Regulatory and non-regulatory options considered

Alternatives to these particular sites were considered and discarded. The current three sites were chosen because of their high concentration of species and significant habitat for these species (e.g. bowheads on the Baffin coast at Ninginganiq and murre and fulmar colonies at Akpait and Qaqulluit) found on these sites. In addition, these three sites were strongly supported by Inuit communities, as is evident by the sites’ inclusion as NWAs in the IIBA. The Government of Canada is now fulfilling the commitment made in that agreement. By not designating these areas as NWAs, unique and important wildlife species and their habitat would not be protected and the Government of Canada would not be implementing the IIBA.

Benefits and costs

There is only one major category of costs potentially incurred with creating these three NWAs: government costs.

Government will incur costs related to the management of the three NWAs, including the establishment and operations of the ACMCs and ACMC secretariat support; the review of applications and authorization of permits under section 4 of the Wildlife Area Regulations; the development of compliance promotion material; and enforcement. The Government of Canada provided the Inuit, through Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, with $5.6 million in contribution funding. In addition, EC receives approximately $2 million over six years starting in 2008–09 for direct support of the Inuit in IIBA work. This funding goes to Inuit organizations and is for the establishment and operations of the Area Co-Management Committees, hiring of Inuit students and other activities. With respect to federal government enforcement, the costs are estimated to be two full-time employees in addition to $180,000 per year, which includes inspections of NWAs, verifications of the visitors and users’ activities and verifications of permit holders for valid permits.

The creation of the NWAs will make a substantial contribution to conservation and protection of essential habitat for wildlife. In doing so, it will assist in meeting Canada’s commitments under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Furthermore, as the 1996 report on the Importance of Nature to Canadians (see footnote 6):The Economic Significance of Nature-related Activities demonstrated, Canada’s natural wealth attracts many visitors and provides important impacts on the Canadian economy with $11.7 billion spent by Canadian residents and U.S. tourists on nature-related activities in Canada. The creation of the three NWAs will further contribute to enriching Canada’s nature-related activities.

Specifically, the Ninginganiq NWA will support a wide range of wildlife such as bowhead whales, polar bears, ringed seals, king eiders, long-tailed duck, dovekies, northern fulmars, halibut, ringed seals and narwhal. The Akpait NWA will provide protection to numerous seabirds, including one of Canada’s largest thick-billed murre colonies (estimated at 133 000 pairs); northern fulmars, which occupy about 20 000 breeding sites in this area; black-legged kittiwakes (1 200 pairs); glaucous gulls; and black guillemots. Polar bears, walruses and several seal species also frequent the marine portion of this NWA. The Qaqulluit NWA is home to Canada’s largest breeding colony of northern fulmars, representing an estimated 22% of the total Canadian population. Healthy populations of marine mammals, including the walrus and ringed seal, use the waters of this NWA.

The NWAs confer additional benefits to the two affected communities, Clyde River and Qikiqtarjuaq, which are located adjacent to these NWAs. Both communities are characterized by limited economic opportunities, young populations and high unemployment. The NWAs will encourage alternative, environmentally appropriate economic development, such as ecotourism, which will help to diversify the local economies, confirm the ecotourism value of NWAs and assist the communities in adapting to evolving socio-economic conditions.

Rationale

NWAs are established and protected under the CWA. To be considered for designation, a site must contain nationally significant habitat for migratory birds, must support wildlife or ecosystems at risk, or must represent rare or unusual wildlife habitat. Once an area has been designated as a NWA, natural features integral to the site are protected by the Act’s Wildlife Area Regulations. These Regulations set out prohibited activities in NWAs and a process for issuing permits that would authorize a person to carry out activities that are considered prohibited under the Regulations.

As part of the IIBA for NWAs and MBSs in the Nunavut Settlement Area (2008), three new NWAs on the coast of Baffin Island were identified: Ninginganiq, Akpait and Qaqulluit. The IIBA was agreed to between the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area, the Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Kitikmeot Inuit Association, the Kivalliq Inuit Association, the Nangmautaq Hunters and Trappers Organization and the Government of Canada under the authority of the NLCA. The three NWAs, comprising 4 534 km2, provide an opportunity to protect unique and important wildlife species and their habitat.

Consultation

The three NWAs are community-initiated projects and have received widespread support from all stakeholders. Community representatives petitioned Environment Canada to establish Qaqulluit, Akpait, and Ninginganiq NWAs. Extensive consultations were undertaken by Environment Canada and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association starting with Clyde River (Ninginganiq NWA) and then with the community of Qikiqtarjuaq (Akpait and Qaqulluit NWAs). Clyde River held a community plebiscite in the early 1990s, which returned 94% support for creating a NWA at Isabella Bay. There has been strong and continuous support from community groups like the local hunters and trappers’ organizations, the elders’ group and the hamlet council. A hamlet council resolution in Qikiqtarjuaq and endorsement by the Qikiqtarjuaq Hunters and Trappers Organization led to the proposal to establish Qaqulluit and Akpait.

The federal departments of Fisheries and Oceans and Indian and Northern Affairs and territorial (Nunavut) government departments were also involved in the consultations. Non-governmental organizations, particularly the World Wildlife Fund, have been closely involved in this initiative. Industry consultations, particularly consultations with cruise ship companies, occurred when establishment of the area was first contemplated. No significant concerns were expressed regarding the creation of these NWAs.

Extensive discussion about the establishment of the three NWAs was realized via the IIBA, which took six years of negotiations and discussions to complete. The establishment of these new NWAs is compatible with (and results from) the NLCA and the IIBA.

The consultations’ positive outcomes with stakeholders have been continuously validated, and support for the creation of these NWAs is still strong. The majority of stakeholders are very eager to have these NWAs established. The Minister of the Environment will announce the designation of these three new NWAs, once Governor in Council approval is received.

Implementation, enforcement and service standards

Under section 13 of the CWA, a corporation may receive a $100,000 maximum fine for a summary conviction offences and a $250,000 maximum fine for indictable offences. A person may receive a $50,000 maximum fine and/or up to six months in jail for summary conviction offences and a $100,000 maximum fine and/or up to five years in jail for indictable offences. There are provisions for increasing fines for a continuing or subsequent offence. Enforcement officers also have the discretion to issue tickets for some minor offences. No concerns were expressed regarding the creation of the NWAs.

Compliance activities associated with the designation of three new NWAs to the Wildlife Area Regulations, Schedule 1, will strive to achieve these principal outcomes:

1. Awareness and understanding of the purpose of NWAs by affected communities;

2. Awareness and understanding of the purpose of NWAs by staff of regional Inuit organizations;

3. Awareness and understanding by EC staff of the manner in which protected areas management must be undertaken pursuant to the IIBA;

4. Successful fostering of an attitude of stewardship in affected communities toward the NWAs; and,

5. Compliance with the CWA and regulations by the affected communities and by EC staff.

These outcomes will be achieved through a variety of compliance promotion and enforcement activities including workshops, production of information materials, inspections of NWAs, verifications of the visitors’ and users’ activities and verifications of permit holders for valid permits.

Performance measurement and evaluation

The performance measurement and evaluation plan for this regulatory initiative is part of the requirements under the IIBA. The IIBA requires annual reviews of the implementation of the agreement, which is summarized in Environment Canada’s departmental performance report and within the annual reporting of the NLCA’s implementation coordinated by the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. A five-year review is also required in order to ensure that the related objectives of the NLCA and the IIBA are being met. Finally, an outcome evaluation of the agreement is planned for the fiscal year 2012–13. The evaluation issues will include success, cost-effectiveness, governance and design and delivery.

Contact

Mary Taylor
Director
Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-953-9097

Footnote a
S.C. 2002, c. 29, s. 136

Footnote b
R.S., c. W-9; S.C. 1994, c. 23, s. 2

Footnote 1
C.R.C., c. 1609; SOR/94-594

Footnote 2
The Nunavut Land Claims Agreement specifies that federal departments and agencies have a legal requirement to conclude IIBAs for existing and new conservation areas, including national wildlife areas and migratory bird sanctuaries.

Footnote 3
In the IIBA, this national wildlife area is described as Niginganiq NWA.

Footnote 4
Under National Topographic System of Canada maps, this national wildlife area is sometimes described as Akpat, when referring to Akpat Bay.

Footnote 5
Under National Topographic System of Canada maps, this national wildlife area is sometimes described as Qaqaluit, when referring to Qaqaluit Island.

Footnote 6
The 1996 report can be found at www.statcan.gc.ca/dli-ild/data-donnees/ftp/sinc-einc/sinc-einc1996-eng.htm.