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SOR/2013-283 December 11, 2012

SPECIAL ECONOMIC MEASURES ACT

Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations

P.C. 2012-1652 December 11, 2012

Whereas the Governor in Council is of the opinion that the situation in Iran constitutes a grave breach of international peace and security that has resulted or is likely to result in a serious international crisis;

Therefore, His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, pursuant to subsections 4(1) to (3) of the Special Economic Measures Act (see footnote a), makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations.

REGULATIONS AMENDING THE SPECIAL ECONOMIC MEASURES (IRAN) REGULATIONS

AMENDMENTS

1. Section 1 of the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

  • “Convention” means the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, done at Vienna on April 18, 1961. (Convention)
  • “mission premises” has the same meaning as “premises of the mission” in Article 1 of the Convention, and includes the mission’s archives. (locaux de la mission)

2. Paragraph 2(a) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

  • (a) a person engaged in activities that directly or indirectly facilitate, support, provide funding for, contribute to, or could contribute to, Iran’s proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities, or to Iran’s activities related to the development of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons of mass destruction or delivery systems for such weapons, including when the person is an entity, a senior official of the entity;

3. Paragraphs 3.1(c) and (d) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

  • (d) any transaction in respect of any account at a financial institution held by a diplomatic mission, if the transaction is required in order for the mission to fulfil its diplomatic functions as set out in Article 3 of the Convention or, if the diplomatic mission has been temporarily or permanently recalled, when the transaction is required in order to maintain the mission premises;

4. (1) Paragraph 4(1)(a) of the Regulations is replaced by the following:

  • (a) any arms and related material whose sale, supply, or transfer is not prohibited by paragraph 3(g) of the Regulations Implementing the United Nations Resolutions on Iran;

(2) Paragraph 4(1)(d) of the Regulations is amended by striking out “and” at the end of subparagraph (i), by adding “and” at the end of subparagraph (ii) and by adding the following after subparagraph (ii):

  • (iii) any item whose sale, supply, or transfer is already prohibited by paragraph 3(f) of the Regulations Implementing the United Nations Resolutions on Iran;

(3) Subsection 4(1) of the Regulations is amended by striking out “or” at the end of paragraph (c) and by adding the following after paragraph (d):

  • (e) any of the following goods, other than those goods that are required to be exported, sold, supplied or shipped under a contract entered into before December 12, 2012:
    • (i) any equipment or machinery designed for the building, maintenance or refitting of ships,
    • (ii) any vessels designed for the transport or storage of crude oil, or any petroleum or petrochemical products, or
    • (iii) any goods designed for drilling, mineral surveying and exploration, including specialized equipment used in the mining industry;
    (f) any specialized equipment used to provide broadcasting, telecommunications, or satellite service to Iran or to an entity acting on behalf of, or on the direction or order of, Iran; or
  • (g) any hard currency from any country, if the total value of the currency exported, sold, supplied or shipped is greater than $40,000.

5. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 4:

4.1 (1) It is prohibited for any person in Canada and any Canadian outside Canada to import, purchase, acquire or ship natural gas, crude oil, or any petroleum or petrochemical products, from Iran.

(2) It is prohibited for any person in Canada and any Canadian outside Canada to provide marketing services or any financial or other services to, from or for the benefit of, or on the direction or order of, Iran or any person in Iran in respect of any of the activities set out in subsection (1).

6. (1) Subparagraphs 5(d)(v) and (vi) of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

  • (vi) financial services in respect of any account at a financial institution held by a diplomatic mission, if the financial services are required in order for the mission to fulfil its diplomatic functions as set out in Article 3 of the Convention or, if the diplomatic mission has been temporarily or permanently recalled, when the financial services are required in order to maintain the mission premises,

(2) Paragraph 5(d) of the Regulations is amended by striking out “and” at the end of subparagraph (vii) and by adding the following after subparagraph (viii):

  • (ix) financial services in respect of transfers of $40,000 or less between a person in Canada and a person in Iran who is their spouse, common-law partner, child or parent, if the person providing the financial services keeps a record of the transaction, and
  • (x) financial services required in order for a person in Iran to obtain legal services in Canada with respect to the application of any of the prohibitions contained in these Regulations;

(3) Section 5 of the Regulations is amended by striking out “or” at the end of paragraph (c), by adding “or” at the end of paragraph (d) and by adding the following after paragraph (d):

  • (e) provide or acquire insurance or reinsurance to, from or for the benefit of, or on the direction or order of, Iran or any entity in Iran.

7. Sections 8 and 8.1 of the Regulations are replaced by the following:

7.1 It is prohibited for any person in Canada and any Canadian outside Canada to provide any flagging or classification services to Iranian oil tankers or cargo vessels.

8. It is prohibited for any person in Canada and any Canadian outside Canada to do anything that causes, assists or promotes, or is intended to cause, assist or promote, any act or thing prohibited by sections 3 to 7.1.

8.1 The prohibitions in sections 4 to 8 do not apply with respect to an activity that has as its purpose

  • (a) the safeguarding of human life;

  • (b) disaster relief; or

  • (c) the provision of food, medicine or medical supplies as listed in Schedule 3.

8. (1) Items 133, 136, 190 and 243 of Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations are repealed.

(2) Item 78 of Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is replaced by the following:

78.  Iran Aircraft Manufacturing Industries (also known as IAMI, IAMCO, HESA, HASA, Iran Aircraft Manufacturing Company, Iran Aircraft Mfg. In. Co., Iran Aircraft Manufacturing Industries Corporation, Havapeyma Sazhran, Hava Payma Sazi-E Iran, Havapeyma Sazi Iran, HESA Trade Center and Karkhanejate Sanaye Havapaymaie Iran)

(3) Item 159 of Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is replaced by the following:

159.  Mavadkaran Jahed Noavar Co. (also known as Mavad Karan and Mavad Karan Jahad-e-No’avar)

(4) Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is amended by adding the following after item 350:

  • 351. Abtin Rahro (also known as Rahro Abtin, Abtin Rahro Parsian and ARP)
  • 352. Aghajari Oil and Gas Production Company (AOGPC)
  • 353. Ajineh Sazane Ariaee
  • 354. Almaseh Sanj Engineering (also known as Almaseh Sanj Co)
  • 355. Aluminat
  • 356. Aluminum Novin (also known as Anodizing Novin)
  • 357. Alunrool Arak (also known as Alumroll Ind. and Mfg. Factory)
  • 358. Amran Sania Iran
  • 359. Argham Terahan Pars
  • 360. Arvandan Oil and Gas Company (AOGC)
  • 361. Atbin (also known as The Atbin Company for Production and Engineering and Fan Avaran Atbin Karmanya)
  • 362. Bank of Industry and Mines
  • 363. Basij-e Mostazafan (also known as Sazman-e Basij-e Mostazafan and the Basij)
  • 364. Bonyan Sanat Hamrah
  • 365. Cooperative Development Bank (also known as Tose’e Ta’avon Bank)
  • 366. Dakik Kar (also known as Daghigh Kar and Qet’e-eh Sazan-e-Daghigh Karan)
  • 367. Dashte Karaj (also known as Tossee Plastoform Gharan Iranian)
  • 368. Darzin Soren
  • 369. DIFACO (also known as Dibagaran Farayand)
  • 370. East Oil and Gas Production Company (EOGPC)
  • 371. Engineering Vala Sanat Erfan
  • 372. Espandana Bespar
  • 373. Ervin Pushesh
  • 374. Falat Asia
  • 375. Fan Avarane Paya Gostaresh
  • 376. Faratech
  • 377. Farayand Roshd
  • 378. Farpajouh
  • 379. Fars Afzar Kimiya (also known as FAKC)
  • 380. Felez Koub (also known as Sanay’e-e-Ahangari-e-Felez Khoub)
  • 381. Fereshteh Salmas (also known as Fereshteh Salmas Ltd-Co. and Reazin Aliaf Salmas)
  • 382. Firouza
  • 383. Gachsaran Oil and Gas Company
  • 384. Gruhe Mohandesine Sanaya Metalurjie Irket (also known as Omran Va Sanaye Iran and OSIMA)
  • 385. Hadid Karan
  • 386. Havasan
  • 387. Hidropars
  • 388. Ida Sazan Pooya
  • 389. Iralco
  • 390. Iran Fuel Conservation Organization (IFCO)
  • 391. Iran Liquefied Natural Gas Co.
  • 392. Iran Pooya (also known as Iran Pouya)
  • 393. Iranian Oil Terminals Company (IOTC)
  • 394. Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (also known as IRGC, Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution, Iranian Revolutionary Guards, IRG and Sepah-e Pasdaran-e Enghelab-e Eslami)
  • 395. Jahan Tech Rooyan Pars
  • 396. Kalot
  • 397. Karoon Oil and Gas Production Company
  • 398. Kharad Sanat Parsian
  • 399. Khazar Exploration and Production Co. (KEPCO)
  • 400. Khod Kafa Abzar
  • 401. Kian Sanat
  • 402. Kankav (also known as Kandav NDT Service)
  • 403. Machine Darou
  • 404. Mahar Kureh
  • 405. Mandegar Baspar Asia (also known as Mandegar Baspar Fajr Asia)
  • 406. MAPTA (also known as Arian Construction and Development Projects Management Company)
  • 407. Maroun Oil and Gas Company
  • 408. Masjed-soleyman Oil and Gas Company (MOGC)
  • 409. Ministry of Energy
  • 410. Ministry of Petroleum
  • 411. National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (also known as National Research Council for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology)
  • 412. National Iranian Drilling Company (NIDC)
  • 413. National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC)
  • 414. National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC)
  • 415. National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company (NIORDC)
  • 416. National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC)
  • 417. Navid Sahand
  • 418. Negan Parto Khevar
  • 419. Niksa Nirou
  • 420. North Drilling Company (NDC)
  • 421. Omran Tahvie
  • 422. Packman
  • 423. Pamco (also known as Palad Air Maker Company and Palad Hava Saz Co.)
  • 424. Pargas Iran
  • 425. Pars Machine
  • 426. Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ)
  • 427. Pars Vacuum Industries (also known as Moein Tejarat Kimiya, PVI and Sanaye’e Vacuum Pars)
  • 428. Parto Ayandeh Sanat (also known as PAS)
  • 429. Parto Namaye Toloua (also known as Parto Tiz)
  • 430. Parzan Sanat
  • 431. Pentan Shimi
  • 432. Petroleum Engineering and Development Company (PEDEC)
  • 433. Pishgam Sanat Composite (also known as Rastband Sanat and Rastband)
  • 434. Pishro Mobtaker Payband (also known as PMP)
  • 435. Pishro Sanat Farayand (also known as Pishro Sanat Faryand Co. Vacuum and Pressure Technologies and Khala Afarin Pars)
  • 436. Rah Avard Afzar
  • 437. Sanatkadeh Shahar
  • 438. Sazeh Morakab
  • 439. Sharif University of Technology, Department of Engineering
  • 440. Shivasp
  • 441. South Zagros Oil and Gas Production Company
  • 442. Tarh O Palayesh
  • 443. Technic Sanat
  • 444. Tehran Tamam
  • 445. The Iranian Institute for Composite Materials
  • 446. Time Kala Tehran Engineering Co.
  • 447. West Oil and Gas Production Company
  • 448. Zist Tajhize Puyesh

9. Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is amended by adding the following after item 51:

52. Majid Namjoo

10. (1) Items 3 and 4 of Schedule 2 to the Regulations are replaced by the following:

Item

Column 1

Goods

Column 2

Description

4.

Aluminum and aluminum alloy products

Piping, tubing, fittings, flanges, forging, castings, valves, any unfinished products in any form and any waste or scrap that are made of aluminum and its alloys that are not specified in the Export Control List.

(2) The portion of item 22 of Schedule 2 to the Regulations in column 2 is replaced by the following:

Item

Column 1


Goods

Column 2


Description

22.

 

(1) High voltage direct current power supply units that are not specified in the Export Control List and

  • (a) are capable of continuously producing 10 kV or more over a period of 8 hours, with output power of 5 kW or more with or without sweeping; and
  • (b) have current or voltage stability better than 0.1% over a period of 4 hours.

(2) Transformers with the specifications necessary for the electricity generated by the high voltage direct current power supply units specified in subsection (1).

(3) The portion of item 28 of Schedule 2 to the Regulations in column 2 is replaced by the following:

Item

Column 1

Goods

Column 2

Description

28.

 

Seals and gaskets made of

  • (a) copolymers of vinylidene fluoride having 75% or more beta crystalline structure without stretching;

  • (b) fluorinated polyimides containing 10% by weight or more of combined fluorine;

  • (c) fluorinated phosphazene elastomers containing 30% by weight or more of combined fluorine;

  • (d) polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE);

  • (e) Viton or other fluoro-elastomers; or

  • (f) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

(4) Schedule 2 to the Regulations is amended by adding the following after item 71:

Item

Column 1

Goods

Column 2

Description

72.

Aluminum, steel, iron, copper, zinc and manganese

In addition to specific items made of those metals referred to in these Regulations, all raw or semi-finished forms of those metals or their alloys.

73.

Electroslag remelters

Electroslag remelters of all types and specifications, and specially designed parts for them.

74.

Graphite

Chemical Abstracts Service registry number 7782-42-5.

75.

Gold, silver, platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium

In addition to specific items made of those metals referred to in these Regulations, all raw, semi-finished or finished forms of those metals or their alloys.

76.

Helium or hydrogen leak detectors

Helium or hydrogen leak detectors capable of detecting leak rates of less than 1 x 10-5 standard cubic centimetres of air per second (atm cc/s for air).

77.

Smelting machinery and products

Any smelting machines and specially designed parts for them, as well as any reducing agents or fluxes used in the smelting process.

78.

Software for integrating industrial processes

Any software used to control or integrate industrial systems, such as SCADA.

79.

Stainless steel valves, piping, tubing and fittings

Any valves, piping, tubing and fittings that are made of stainless steel type 304, 316 or 317 and that are not specified in the Export Control List.

80.

Vacuum arc remelters

Vacuum arc remelters of all types and specifications, and specially designed parts for them.

81.

Vacuum induction melting furnaces

Vacuum induction melting furnaces of all types and specifications, and specially designed parts for them.

11. The Regulations are amended by adding, after Schedule 2, the Schedule 3 set out in the schedule to these Regulations.

APPLICATION BEFORE PUBLICATION

12. For the purpose of paragraph 11(2)(a) of the Statutory Instruments Act , these Regulations apply before they are published in the Canada Gazette.

COMING INTO FORCE

13. These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are registered.

SCHEDULE
(Section 11)

SCHEDULE 3
(Section 8.1)

FOOD, MEDICINE AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES

Goods listed under the following categories of the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System published by the World Customs Organization:

Column 1

Category Code

Column 2


Category Description

Column 3


Applicable Subcategories

02

Meat and edible meat offal

All

03

Fish and crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic invertebrates

Excluding 0301.10, 0301.11, 0301.91, 0301.92, 0301.93 and 0301.99

04

Dairy produce; birds’ eggs; natural honey; edible products of animal origin not elsewhere specified or included

All

07

Edible vegetables and certain roots and tubers

All

08

Edible fruits and nuts; peel of citrus fruit or melons

All

10

Cereals

All

11

Products of the milling industry, malt, starches, inulin and wheat gluten

All

12

Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits; miscellaneous grains, seeds and fruit; industrial or medicinal plants; straw and fodder.

1201.00, 1202.30, 1202.41, 1202.42, 1208.10 and 1208.90

16

Preparations of meat, of fish or of crustaceans, molluscs or other aquatic invertebrates

All

19

Preparations of cereals, flour, starch or milk; pastrycooks’ products

Excluding 1905.90

20

Preparations of vegetables, fruit, nuts or other parts of plants

All

21

Miscellaneous edible preparations

All

30

Pharmaceutical products

3002.20, 3003.10, 3003.20, 3003.31, 3003.39, 3003.40, 3003.90, 3004.10, 3004.20, 3004.31, 3004.32, 3004.39, 3004.40, 3004.90, 3005.10, 3005.90, 3006.10, 3006.20, 3006.30, 3006.40 and 3006.50

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

1. Background

On July 26, 2010, sanctions against Iran were enacted under the Special Economic Measures Act in response to Iran’s nuclear proliferation activities, its violation of multiple United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions and its failure to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Governor in Council had determined that the situation constituted a grave breach of international peace and security that had resulted or was likely to result in a serious international crisis. The Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations (the Iran Regulations) prohibited dealings with a list of designated persons, banned the export of goods used in the liquefaction of gas or the refining of oil as well as the export of arms and related material not already prohibited under existing United Nations sanctions, prohibited the provision of certain financial services to persons in Iran and prohibited the export of a long list of goods and related technology that could be used in Iran’s nuclear and missile programs.

The Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations of October 18, 2011, added five individuals that are senior officials of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps Quds Force, or are associated with such senior officials, to the list of designated persons. These individuals were implicated in the plot to kill the Saudi ambassador in the United States.

The Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations of November 21, 2011, further amended the Regulations in response to the IAEA’s November 9, 2011, assessment of Iran’s nuclear program. The new sanctions prohibited all financial transactions with Iran, subject to certain exceptions; expanded the list of prohibited goods to include all goods used in the petrochemical, oil and gas industry in Iran; added prohibited goods to include items that could be used in Iran’s nuclear program; added new individuals and entities to the list of designated persons found in Schedule 1 of the Iran Regulations; and removed certain entities that were recommended for removal by the Minister of Foreign Affairs as no longer presenting a proliferation concern for Canada.

The Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations of January 31, 2012, added three individuals and five entities to the list of designated persons. These individuals were listed in order to maintain unity with the measures adopted by the European Union (EU).

The Regulations are now further amended in response to Iran’s continued lack of cooperation with the IAEA and the P5+1 group (UNSC permanent members and Germany), which has engaged negotiations with Iran on its nuclear program, and to maintain unity and consistency with the latest measures adopted by the European Union and other countries.

The latest amendments prohibit any person in Canada or Canadian abroad from

  • dealing in the property of 98 newly designated entities, and one newly designated individual, that engage in activities that directly or indirectly facilitate, support, provide funding for, or contribute to, or could contribute to, Iran’s proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities, or to Iran’s activities related to the development of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons of mass destructions or delivery systems for such weapons;
  • exporting, selling, supplying or shipping any of the following goods, wherever situated, to Iran:
  • equipment or machinery designed for the building, maintenance or refitting of ships,
  • vessels designed for the transport or storage of oil and petroleum or petrochemical products,
  • goods designed for drilling, surveying and mineral exploration, and specialized equipment used in the mining industry,
  • goods used to provide broadcasting, telecommunications or satellite services to Iran or to any entity acting on behalf of, or at the direction or order of Iran, and
  • goods used in the production of metals, and new goods of proliferation concern, as added to Schedule 2 of the Iran Regulations;
  • providing any flagging or classification services to Iranian oil tankers or cargo vessels;
  • providing or acquiring insurance and reinsurance to, from or for the benefit of, or on the direction or order of, Iran or any entity in Iran;
  • exporting to Iran any hard currency from any country and of any denomination that is greater in value than $40,000;
  • importing, purchasing, acquiring or shipping natural gas, oil, petroleum or petrochemical products from Iran; and
  • providing marketing services, or any financial or other related services in respect of prohibited goods.

In order to relieve some of the pressure on ordinary Iranians, recent Iranian immigrants to Canada, and family members of persons in Iran, the Iran Regulations are also amended to allow all financial banking transactions of $40,000 and under between family members in Canada and family members in Iran. The Iran Regulations also remove names of entities that no longer present a proliferation concern to Canada.

2. Issue

Iran’s persistent failure to comply with its obligations under its Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement and relevant UNSC resolutions is the cause of grave concern to the IAEA and the broader world community, including Canada. On November 16, 2012, the IAEA’s Director General concluded in his report that Iran has failed to cooperate with the IAEA as required in relevant resolutions (GOV/2011/69 and GOV/2012/50) to resolve outstanding issues pertaining to its nuclear program. Most critically, there has been no further progress on the Agency’s investigation into the Possible Military Dimensions (PMD) of Iran’s program. The report contains a detailed listing of the attempts the IAEA has made to engage in meaningful dialogue with Iran to no avail, clearly demonstrating continued stonewalling of the IAEA by Iran.

Multiple rounds of international sanctions have not yet affected the pace of Iran’s nuclear program and its enrichment activities. Iran has proven able to circumvent existing sanctions and to obtain, through front companies led by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) business conglomerate, diverse sources of funding that may contribute to Iran’s nuclear activities.

3. Objectives

The objectives of the Regulations are to add further obstacles to Iran’s efforts to build its nuclear program, and to persuade Iran’s leadership to resume negotiations with respect to its nuclear program. The latest amendments of the Regulations are closely aligned with the most recent EU sanctions with a view to strengthen international pressure, and expand the sanctions to strategic sectors that indirectly contribute to the nuclear program. Amendments seek to

  • further target sources of funding that may contribute to Iran’s nuclear program, notably through revenue from oil sales;
  • limit Iran’s capacity to trade in gold or other currencies outside the financial banking system;
  • widen the list of prohibited goods and listed persons and entities;
  • allow non-objectionable transactions of $40,000 or less; and
  • amend the list of designated persons to remove those persons that the Minister of Foreign Affairs has determined no longer present a proliferation concern.

4. Description

The latest Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations prohibit additional goods and services and add close to 100 entities to the list of designated persons subject to a prohibition on dealings under the Regulations. The Minister of Foreign Affairs is authorized to issue permits to allow those affected by the Regulations to undertake activities that would otherwise be prohibited. The amendments also remove from the list of designated persons those who no longer fulfill the criteria for being a designated person.

5. Consultation

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade drafted the amendments to the Iran Regulations following consultations with the Department of Justice, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Citizenship and Immigration, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food and the Privy Council Office. All departments and agencies consented to this action.

6. Small business lens

The existing prohibitions on financial services between Canada and Iran bring increasing complexities to trade and banking transactions with Iran, including for exempted goods. The new measures are expected to have an impact on Canadian companies active in the additional prohibited sectors, but the impacts are limited as trade activities with Iran have decreased significantly in recent years. The Minister of Foreign Affairs is authorized to issue permits to allow those affected by the Regulations to undertake activities that would otherwise be prohibited.

7. Rationale

The provisions of the Regulations were implemented to put pressure on the Government of Iran to urgently comply with UNSC resolutions and other legal obligations regarding its nuclear program and to halt its proliferation activities. The measures contained in the amendments to the Regulations are the best available options to contain Iran’s nuclear program and to urge Iran to enter meaningful negotiations. The international community seeks to achieve a comprehensive, long-standing and peaceful settlement with Iran, with proper safeguard measures and transparency, in a way that would restore confidence in the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran’s nuclear program. Canada and its partners are adopting new sanctions in support of efforts to seek a diplomatic settlement to the Iranian crisis.

8. Implementation, enforcement and service standards

Provisions of Canada’s sanctions are enforced by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canada Border Services Agency.

9. Contacts

Cheryl Cruz
Deputy Director
United Nations, Human Rights and Economic Law Division (JLH)
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2
Telephone: 613-944-1599
Fax: 613-992-2467
Email: cheryl.cruz@international.gc.ca

Hugh Adsett
Director
United Nations, Human Rights and Economic Law Division (JLH)
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2
Telephone: 613-992-6296
Fax: 613-992-2467
Email: hugh.adsett@international.gc.ca

Daniel Maksymiuk
Deputy Director
Gulf Countries and Regional Trade Division
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2
Telephone: 613-944-3022
Fax: 613-944-7975
Email: daniel.maksymiuk@international.gc.ca