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Registration

SOR/2012-288 December 14, 2012

NUCLEAR SAFETY AND CONTROL ACT

Regulations Amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations

P.C. 2012-1717 December 13, 2012

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, pursuant to subsections 20(3) and 44(1) (see footnote a) of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (see footnote b), makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations.

Ottawa, October 24, 2012

MICHAEL BINDER
President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Natural Resources pursuant to subsections 20(3) and 44(1) (see footnote c) of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (see footnote d), approves the annexed Regulations Amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations, made by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

REGULATIONS AMENDING THE CLASS I NUCLEAR FACILITIES REGULATIONS AND THE URANIUM MINES AND MILLS REGULATIONS

CLASS I NUCLEAR FACILITIES REGULATIONS

1. Section 1 of the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

“federal authority” means

  • (a) a Minister of the Crown in right of Canada;
  • (b) an agency of the Government of Canada or a parent Crown corporation, as defined in subsection 83(1) of the Financial Administration Act, or any other body established under an Act of Parliament that is ultimately accountable through a Minister of the Crown in right of Canada to Parliament for the conduct of its affairs;
  • (c) any department or departmental corporation that is set out in Schedule I or II to the Financial Administration Act;
  • (d) any other body that is set out in Schedule 1 to the Canadian
    Environmental Assessment Act, 2012
    ; and
  • (e) the Executive Council of — or a minister, department, agency or body of the government of — Yukon, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut.
  • It does not include a council of the band within the meaning of the Indian Act, Export Development Canada or the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. It also does not include a Crown corporation that is a wholly-owned subsidiary, as defined in subsection 83(1) of the Financial Administration Act, a harbour commission established under the Harbour Commissions Act or a not-for-profit corporation that enters into an agreement under subsection 80(5) of the Canada Marine Act, that is not set out in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012. (autorité fédérale)

“jurisdiction” means

  • (a) a federal authority;
  • (b) any agency or body that is established under an Act of Parliament and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a Class I nuclear facility or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (c) the government of a province;
  • (d) any agency or body that is established under an Act of the legislature of a province, and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a Class I nuclear facility or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (e) any body that is established under a land claims agreement referred to in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a Class I nuclear facility or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (f) a governing body that is established under legislation that relates to the self-government of Indians and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a Class I nuclear facility or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (g) a government of a foreign state or of a subdivision of a foreign state, or any institution of such a government; and
  • (h) an international organization of states or any institution of such an organization. (instance)

2. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 8:

TIME LINES: APPLICATION FOR LICENCE TO PREPARE SITE

COMPLIANCE VERIFICATION

8.1 The Commission shall, within 60 days after the day on which an application for a licence to prepare a site for a Class I nuclear facility is received, determine whether the application contains sufficient detailed information for the Commission to commence its review.

TIME PERIODS — REVIEW OF APPLICATION

8.2 The Commission shall, within five days after the day on which it determines that an application contains sufficient detailed information for it to commence its review, give notice of the commencement of its review

  • (a) by providing notice in writing to this effect by mail or email to the applicant; and
  • (b) by posting notice to this effect on its Internet site.

8.3 (1) The Commission shall render its decision in respect of an application within a time period of 24 months from the day on which the notice is posted in accordance with paragraph 8.2(b).

(2) The following are excluded from the 24-month time period:

  • (a) any period granted by the Commission for the preparation and submission of information requested by the Commission, which in the opinion of the Commission is necessary to complete the review;
  • (b) any period, not to exceed 30 days following the Commission’s receipt of a response to the request for information referred to in paragraph (a), that the Commission requires to determine whether the information requested has been provided and is adequate;
  • (c) any period that is required by any jurisdiction to respond to an offer to consult and cooperate made by the Commission under section 18 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 with respect to the Class I nuclear facility and, if the offer is accepted by any jurisdiction, any period that is required for consultation and cooperation with that jurisdiction;
  • (d) any period that is required to conduct, and render a decision on, an environmental assessment of the proposed preparation of the site for the Class I nuclear facility, or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment, by any jurisdiction that is obligated by law to conduct that assessment and render a decision; and
  • (e) any period during which the licence application review was adjourned under section 14 of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Rules of Procedure.

(3) The Commission shall give notice of the beginning and end of any period that is excluded from the 24 months

  • (a) by providing notice in writing to this effect by mail or email to the applicant; and
  • (b) by posting notice to this effect on its Internet site.

URANIUM MINES AND MILLS REGULATIONS

3. Section 1 of the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations (see footnote 2) is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order:

“federal authority” means

  • (a) a Minister of the Crown in right of Canada;
  • (b) an agency of the Government of Canada or a parent Crown corporation, as defined in subsection 83(1) of the Financial Administration Act, or any other body established under an Act of Parliament that is ultimately accountable through a Minister of the Crown in right of Canada to Parliament for the conduct of its affairs;
  • (c) any department or departmental corporation that is set out in Schedule I or II to the Financial Administration Act;
  • (d) any other body that is set out in Schedule 1 to the Canadian
    Environmental Assessment Act, 2012
    ; and
  • (e) the Executive Council of — or a minister, department, agency or body of the government of — Yukon, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut.
  • It does not include a council of the band within the meaning of the Indian Act, Export Development Canada or the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. It also does not include a Crown corporation that is a wholly-owned subsidiary, as defined in subsection 83(1) of the Financial Administration Act, a harbour commission established under the Harbour Commissions Act or a not-for-profit corporation that enters into an agreement under subsection 80(5) of the Canada Marine Act, that is not set out in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012. (autorité fédérale)

“jurisdiction” means

  • (a) a federal authority;
  • (b) any agency or body that is established under an Act of Parliament and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a uranium mine or mill or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (c) the government of a province;
  • (d) any agency or body that is established under an Act of the legislature of a province, and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a uranium mine or mill or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (e) any body that is established under a land claims agreement referred to in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a uranium mine or mill or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (f) a governing body that is established under legislation that relates to the self-government of Indians and that has powers, duties or functions in relation to an assessment of the environmental effects of the preparation of a site for a uranium mine or mill or its construction, operation, decommissioning or abandonment;
  • (g) a government of a foreign state or of a subdivision of a foreign state, or any institution of such a government; and
  • (h) an international organization of states or any institution of such an organization. (instance)

4. The Regulations are amended by adding the following after section 8:

TIME LINES: APPLICATION FOR LICENCE TO PREPARE SITE AND CONSTRUCT

Compliance Verification

8.1 The Commission shall, within 60 days after the day on which an application for a licence to prepare a site for and construct a uranium mine or mill is received, determine whether the application contains sufficient detailed information for the Commission to commence its review.

Time Periods — Review of Application

8.2 The Commission shall, within five days after the day on which it determines that an application contains sufficient detailed information for it to commence its review, give notice of the commencement of its review

  • (a) by providing notice in writing to this effect by mail or email to the applicant; and
  • (b) by posting notice to this effect on its Internet site.

8.3 (1) The Commission shall render its decision in respect of an application within a time period of 24 months from the day on which the notice is posted in accordance with paragraph 8.2(b).

(2) The following are excluded from the 24-month time period:

  • (a) any period granted by the Commission for the preparation and submission of information requested by the Commission, which in the opinion of the Commission is necessary to complete the review;
  • (b) any period, not to exceed 30 days following the Commission’s receipt of a response to the request for information referred to in paragraph (a), that the Commission requires to determine whether the information requested has been provided and is adequate;
  • (c) any period that is required by any jurisdiction to respond to an offer to consult and cooperate made by the Commission under section 18 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 with respect to the environmental assessment of the proposed preparation of the site for, and construction of, the uranium mine or mill, or its operation, decommissioning or abandonment, and, if the offer is accepted by any jurisdiction, any period that is required for consultation and cooperation with that jurisdiction;
  • (d) any period that is required to conduct, and render a decision on, an environmental assessment of the proposed preparation of the site for, and construction of, the uranium mine or mill, or its operation, decommissioning or abandonment, by any jurisdiction that is obligated by law to conduct that assessment and render a decision; and
  • (e) any period during which the licence application review was adjourned under section 14 of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Rules of Procedure.

(3) The Commission shall give notice of the beginning and end of any period that is excluded from the 24 months

  • (a) by providing notice in writing to this effect by mail or email to the applicant; and
  • (b) by posting notice to this effect on its Internet site.

TRANSITIONAL PROVISION

5. These Regulations do not apply in respect of an application for a licence to prepare a site for a Class I nuclear facility or for a licence to prepare a site for and construct a uranium mine or mill that was submitted before the coming into force of these Regulations.

COMING INTO FORCE

6. These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are registered.

REGULATORY IMPACT
ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

1. Executive summary

Issue: Nuclear projects are multi-year initiatives, with complex regulatory reviews and processes. While information requirements are clearly laid out in regulations and other regulatory documents, there is a continued perception that regulatory reviews introduce project risks, in particular regarding the potential uncertainty of the timelines associated with such reviews.

Some provinces in Canada are reviewing options for potential new nuclear power plants. In addition, the expansion of nuclear power, particularly in Asia, has led to renewed interest in uranium mining in Canada. These projects involve significant regulatory effort by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC, the Commission) and the applicant for nuclear power plants and mining projects during the licensing reviews.

Description: As part of the Government of Canada’s Responsible Resource Development initiative, the Commission is amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations to establish 24-month timelines in regulations for projects that require its regulatory review and decision on new applications for the following types of licences:

  • a licence to prepare site for a Class I nuclear facility; and
  • a combined licence to prepare site for and construct a uranium mine or mill.

The 24-month timelines are based on the Commission’s current regulatory review process.

The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and its regulations set out the information that is required for licence applications. These requirements are not changing. The review of the information submitted by applicants in support of the application is carried out with input from other federal and provincial government departments and agencies responsible for regulating health and safety, security and environmental protection. The focus on delivering high-quality regulatory reviews will continue.

For some projects, the CNSC may be required to conduct an environmental assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012). Where the CNSC will need to carry out an EA in addition to its regulatory review, the EA will be completed within the same 24-month timelines.

The 24-month timeline will not affect the ability of the public and Aboriginal groups to fully participate in the licence application review process.

Cost-benefit statement: The introduction of timelines for regulatory reviews in support of the issuance of a licence to prepare a site for a new Class I nuclear facility and a licence to prepare a site for and construct a new uranium mine or mill will improve the predictability of regulatory reviews. The regulatory review process could be a potential factor in the calculation of return on investment for large resource projects, in particular with regard to identifying potential project risks. As a result, industry would benefit from a commitment to predictable and timely regulatory reviews, which would serve to minimize potential project uncertainty and risk.

The CNSC operates on a cost-recovery basis, directly recovering costs associated with regulatory reviews from project applicants. The Regulations will not impact the total regulatory effort associated with a review and will therefore not impact the costs charged to applicants.

Performance measurement and evaluation: The CNSC has a well-established evaluation program, which includes periodic reviews of the CNSC’s approach to regulating major projects, including new applications for Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills. Performance against the timelines prescribed in this amendment will be reported publicly, as required by these regulations and discussed in the CNSC’s annual report to Parliament.

2. Background

The Commission is a quasi-judicial administrative tribunal that regulates the Canadian nuclear industry in order to protect the health, safety, environment and security of Canadians from the risks associated with the production and use of nuclear energy and substances, and to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The Commission is mandated under the NSCA to regulate all nuclear facilities and nuclear-related activities in Canada. Regulations issued under the NSCA list the regulatory information that applicants must submit to the Commission as part of their licence applications.

The Commission has up to seven appointed permanent members whose decisions are implemented by more than 800 employees. These employees review applications for licences in accordance with requirements set out in regulations and other regulatory documents, make recommendations to the Commission, and enforce compliance with the NSCA, regulations under the Act, and any licence conditions imposed by the Commission.

The in-depth review of the information submitted by applicants in support of their application is carried out with input from other federal and provincial government departments and agencies responsible for regulating health and safety, security, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and the transportation of dangerous goods.

In recent years, new and amended federal legislation and regulations have set out timelines for federal environmental and regulatory reviews. The Government of Canada has committed in the Responsible Resource Development initiative to streamline the review process for major economic projects in order to ensure predictable and timely reviews. The overall objective is to improve project planning for applicants of major economic projects to ensure more predictable and timely regulatory reviews and enhance Canada’s investment climate.

The CNSC has determined that mandatory timelines for regulatory reviews will apply to initial regulatory approvals for new Class I nuclear facilities and for new uranium mines and mills. The legislative authority to make timelines falls under subsections 20(3) and 44(1) of the NSCA.

3. Issue

Nuclear projects are multi-year initiatives, with complex regulatory reviews and processes. While information requirements are set out in the regulations, there is a continued perception that regulatory reviews can introduce project risks, in particular regarding the potential uncertainty of the timelines associated with such reviews.

Some provinces in Canada are reviewing options for potential new nuclear power plants. In addition, the expansion of nuclear power, particularly in Asia, has lead to renewed interest in uranium mining in Canada. These projects involve significant regulatory effort by the CNSC and the applicant of the nuclear and mining project during licensing reviews.

4. Objectives

The objective of these Regulations is to establish timelines on the Commission for reviews of licence applications to prepare site for new Class I nuclear facilities, as defined in the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations, and licence applications to prepare site for and construct new uranium mines or mills, as defined in the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations. Regulated timelines will enable applicants to better plan and manage nuclear projects.

5. Description

The Regulations establish 24-month timelines for the regulatory review of, and Commission decision on

  • an application for a licence to prepare a site for a Class I nuclear facility; and
  • an application for a combined licence to prepare a site for and construct a uranium mine or mill.

The timelines include the time needed to

  • complete a technical assessment of the application;
  • conduct a public hearing for the licensing decision on the application; and
  • publish the Commission’s decision.

A regulatory review would be initiated once the Commission has determined, within 60 days of receiving an application, that the applicant has submitted sufficient information to begin the review. A notice that the regulatory review has commenced would then be provided to the applicant and posted on the CNSC’s Web site.

The timelines apply to Commission activities only and would not include the time

  • to verify that the initial licence application includes a comprehensive set of documentation in support of the application (up to 60 days);
  • to collect information requested by the Commission;
  • for the CNSC to assess the completeness of a submission in response to an information request (up to 30 days);
  • to cooperate with another jurisdiction for environmental assessments as per section 18 of CEAA 2012;
  • for matters outside of the Commission’s control, such as the time for other jurisdictions to participate and to complete an environmental assessment; or
  • during which the review is adjourned under section 14 of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Rules of Procedure.

The timelines take into account the time necessary to conduct public hearings and to allow stakeholders and intervenors to prepare for and fully participate in the regulatory review of the project.

6. Regulatory and non-regulatory options considered

Over the years, the CNSC has established formal processes for managing regulatory reviews of major, complex projects while ensuring the efficiency of the regulatory process. In addition, the CNSC has increased transparency of its regulatory reviews through a variety of mechanisms, including

  • developing and publishing project timelines for major projects on its Web site;
  • issuing documents to clearly explain the licensing process;
  • establishing protocols with applicants to ensure a clear understanding of expectations and timelines; and
  • participating in government-wide initiatives such as the Major Projects Management Office, including its commitment to transparent project timelines.

As a response to the Government of Canada’s commitment in the Responsible Resource Development initiative to streamline the review process for major economic projects, specified timelines in the regulations are designed to increase regulatory predictability of regulatory reviews. The timelines are based on existing standards and/or historical review performance in the licensing process. The introduction of regulated timelines in regulations does not affect the robustness of these regulatory reviews, nor does it change the requirements in the NSCA or the requirements in the regulations. Adding a review of 24 months in the regulations will ensure that the timelines for reviewing and deciding on a licence to prepare a site for a Class I nuclear facility and a licence to prepare a site for and construct a uranium mine or mill will impose a discipline on the CNSC.

7. Benefits and costs

The introduction of timelines for regulatory reviews in support of the issuance of a licence to prepare a site for a new Class I nuclear facility and a licence to prepare a site for and construct a new uranium mine or mill will improve the predictability of regulatory reviews. The regulatory review process could be a potential factor in the calculation of return on investment for large resource projects, in particular with regard to identifying potential project risks. As a result, industry would benefit from a commitment to predictable and timely regulatory review processes, which would serve to minimize potential project uncertainty and risk.

The Commission operates on a cost-recovery basis, directly recovering costs associated with regulatory reviews from project applicants. The Regulations will not impact the total regulatory effort associated with a review and will therefore not impact the costs charged to applicants.

8. Small business lens and “One-for-One” Rule

There is no significant impact on small businesses, since the Regulations establish timelines on the Commission to complete its reviews and decision on licence applications to prepare sites for major nuclear projects such as Class I nuclear facilities and licence applications to prepare sites and construct for new uranium mines or mills. There are no incremental compliance costs, nor any incremental administrative costs for small business as a result of these Regulations.

In addition, the Government of Canada has committed to reducing the regulatory burden to Canadian businesses by implementing a “One-for-One” Rule. When amending existing regulations, the “One-for-One” Rule requires regulators to offset, from their existing regulations, an equal amount of administrative burden on business as the regulatory amendments add. The Regulations do not add any incremental administrative costs to Canadian business, as they do not impose any new obligations or requirements. The Commission’s in-depth review of the information submitted by applicants in support of their application is not changing.

9. Consultation

The CNSC issued a discussion paper for public consultation on the Regulations Amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations, on July 10, 2012, for a 30-day comment period. An invitation to comment on the discussion paper was posted on the CNSC’s Web site and the Consulting with Canadians Web site and a notification was posted on the CNSC’s Facebook page. An email notification was also forwarded to the over 2 000 subscribers to the CNSC’s Web site. The discussion paper is available at nuclearsafety.gc.ca.

On August 20, 2012, the CNSC posted all comments received on the discussion paper, and issued an invitation to provide feedback for a 10-day period. No additional feedback was received.

Comments were received from six stakeholders representing nuclear power plant operators, uranium suppliers, research institutions and industry associations. No comments were received from non-government organizations or Aboriginal groups.

In general, stakeholders supported measures which would improve the predictability and timeliness of regulatory reviews of major nuclear projects, including the establishment of timelines in regulation. Several stakeholders were of the view that 24 months should be the maximum amount of time for the regulatory review, indicating that it could potentially be shortened to 12 or 18 months.

Some stakeholders recommended the establishment of regulated timelines for other regulatory reviews and approvals, including environmental assessments, raising the importance of coordinating environmental assessments with licensing reviews. Stakeholders also noted that the CNSC has been addressing the issue of cooperation with other jurisdictions with some effectiveness, and suggest that continued attention to this issue is needed to ensure certainty in regulatory reviews.

Finally, stakeholders noted that the CNSC has developed clear expectations regarding the necessary information for the licence application, which should negate the need for “stop clock” provisions. One stakeholder noted that the Regulations do not provide any real improvement over the current process.

In finalizing these Regulations, the CNSC reviewed all input received from stakeholders and adjusted the Regulations as appropriate. Additional clarity around the integration of environmental assessments has been included in this Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement (RIAS). The CNSC may be required to conduct an EA under CEAA 2012 for some projects. Where the CNSC will need to carry out an EA in addition to its regulatory review, the EA will be completed within the same 24-month timeline.

The CNSC continues to be committed to timely delivery of all regulatory approvals; however, it has focussed these Regulations on the first licensing of new major nuclear projects. While the CNSC will continue its practice of establishing protocols with applicants for major regulatory reviews and approvals, it is of the view that the establishment of a 24-month maximum review period in regulations, consistent with the timelines for review panels under CEAA 2012, is appropriate.

The CNSC agrees that clear expectations should minimize the need for stop-clock provisions, and it has drafted these Regulations to accommodate only circumstances when the Regulatory review cannot progress in the absence of information which, in the opinion of the Commission, is necessary to render a regulatory decision.

10. Regulatory cooperation

In recent years, new and amended federal legislation and regulations have set out timelines for federal environmental and regulatory reviews. The Government of Canada has committed in the Responsible Resource Development initiative to streamline the review process for major economic projects in order to ensure predictable and timely regulatory reviews.

A key objective of the Responsible Resource Development initiativeis to make the timing of the review process for major projects more predictable in order to facilitate investment and planning decisions that will lead to job creation and economic growth. These Regulations align with other federal regulatory bodies to provide more predictable timelines for regulatory reviews of applications for major projects.

11. Rationale

The Regulations will provide more predictable timelines for regulatory reviews while maintaining safety and effective regulatory oversight. The CNSC has extensive experience in managing regulatory reviews of major, complex projects, such as licensing Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills. The Regulations will not compromise the safety of nuclear facilities or uranium mines and mills, affect the rigour and depth of its technical assessments of licence applications, or limit the opportunity of the public and Aboriginal groups to participate in public hearings.

12. Implementation, enforcement and service standards

The Regulations will come into force on the day they are registered. The Regulations do not affect the Commission’s compliance and enforcement policies; they establish timelines for the Commission to complete its reviews and decision on licence applications to prepare sites for new Class I nuclear facilities and licence applications to prepare sites and construct for uranium mines or mills within 24 months.

For ongoing regulatory reviews of licence applications to prepare site for new Class I nuclear facilities and licence applications to prepare site and construct for uranium mines or mills, the Commission is committed to completing its regulatory review and provide its decision within 24 months.

In making a decision on a licence application, the Commission considers the applicant’s request, recommendations from staff, and any submissions from intervenors (including the public and Aboriginal groups) made during public hearings. Once a licence is issued by the Commission, CNSC staff verify and enforce compliance with the NSCA, regulations under the Act, and any licence conditions the Commission imposes. The CNSC remains committed to protecting the health, safety and security of the public, and the environment.

13. Performance measurement and evaluation

The CNSC has a well-established evaluation program, which includes periodic reviews of the CNSC’s approach to regulating major projects, including new applications for Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills. Performance against the timelines prescribed in this amendment will be reported publicly, as required by these regulations and discussed in the CNSC’s annual report to Parliament.

14. Contacts

Colin Moses
Director
Regulatory Framework Division
Telephone: 613-995-5430
Email: Colin.Moses@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
280 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5S9
Telephone: 613-991-3153