ARCHIVED — Vol. 149, No. 21 — October 21, 2015

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Registration

SOR/2015-226 October 14, 2015

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2015-87-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List

Whereas the Minister of the Environment has been provided with information under either paragraph 87(1)(a) or (5)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a) in respect of each substance referred to in the annexed Order;

Whereas, in respect of the substances being added to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b) pursuant to subsection 87(1) of that Act, the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are satisfied that those substances have been manufactured in or imported into Canada, by the person who provided the information, in excess of the quantity prescribed under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) (see footnote c);

Whereas the period for assessing the information under section 83 of that Act has expired;

And whereas no conditions under paragraph 84(1)(a) of that Act in respect of the substances are in effect;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote d), makes the annexed Order 2015-87-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, October 13, 2015

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2015-87-12-01 AMENDING THE DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENTS

1. Part 1 of the Domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

  • 1422377-33-0 N-P
  • 1466414-34-5 N-P
  • 1482217-03-7 N

2. Part 3 of the List is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

18878-5 N Propanoic acid, 3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methyl-, polymer with 1,6-diisocyanatohexane and alkanetriyltris[ω-hydroxypoly[oxo(alkyl-alkanediyl)]] 2-propenoate, 2-hydroxyl-3-[(1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]propyl neodecanoate-blocked
Acide 2,2-bis(hydroxyméthyl)propanoïque polymérisé avec du 1,6-diisocyanatohexane et de l’acrylate d’alcanetriyltris[ω-hydroxypoly[oxy(alkylalcanediyle)]], séquencé avec du néodécanoate de 2-hydroxyl-3-[(prop-2-énoyl)oxy]propyle
18880-7 N Alkyl alcohol triester with boric acid (H3BO3)
Triester d’acide borique (H3BO3) et d’un alcanol
18881-8 N Poly[oxy(alkyl-alkanediyl)], α-hydro-ω-hydroxy-, polymer with 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3, 3-trimethylcyclohexane, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-blocked
α-Hydro-ω-hydroxypoly[oxy(alkylalcanediyle)] polymérisé avec du 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatométhyl)-1, 3,3-triméthylcyclohexane, séquencé avec du méthacrylate de 2-hydroxyéthyle
18882-0 N-P 2,5-Furandione, polymer with 1-dodecene, alkyl alkyl esters
Furane-2,5-dione polymérisée avec du dodéc-1-ène, esters alkylalkyliques
18883-1 N-P Alkanediol, polymer with α-hydro-ω-hydroxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) and 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3, 3-trimethylcyclohexane, bis(1-phenylethyl)phenol-and 2,4,6-tris(1-phenylethyl)phenol-blocked
Alcanediol polymérisé avec de l’α-hydro-ω-hydroxypoly(oxyéthane-1,2-diyle) et du 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatométhyl)-1,3,3-triméthylcyclohexane, séquencé avec du bis(1-phényléthyl)phénol et du 2,4,6-tris(1-phényléthyl)phénol
18884-2 N Propanoic acid, 3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methyl-, polymer with diamine and 1,1′-methylenebis[4-isocyanatocyclohexane], pentaerythritol triacrylate-blocked, compds. with triethylamine
Acide 2,2-bis(hydroxyméthyl)propanoïque polymérisé avec une diamine et du 1,1-méthylènebis[4-isocyanatocyclohexane], séquencé avec du triester d’acide acrylique et du 2,2-bis(hydroxyméthyl)propane-1,3-diol, composés avec la N,N-diéthyléthanamine
18886-4 N 2,5-Furandione, telomer with ethenylbenzene and (1-methylethyl)benzene, 3-(dimethylamino)propyl imide, imide with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol 2-aminopropyl Me ether, 2-[alkyloxymethyl]oxirane-quaternized, benzoates (salts)
Furane-2,5-dione télomérisée avec du styrène et du (propane-2-yl)benzène, imide 3-(diméthylamino)propylique, imide avec de l’oxyde de poly(éthane-1,2-diol-propane-1,2-diol), de 2-aminopropyle et de méthyle, quaternisé avec du 2-[(alkyloxy)méthyl]oxirane, benzoates (sels)

COMING INTO FORCE

3. This Order comes into force on the day on which it is registered.

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Order.)

Issues

Canadians depend on substances that are used in hundreds of goods, from medicines to computers, fabric and fuels. Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), substances (i.e. chemicals, polymers, nanomaterials and living organisms) “new” to Canada are subject to reporting requirements before they can be manufactured or imported. This limits market access until human health and environmental impacts associated with the new substances are assessed and managed where appropriate. Adding substances to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) under CEPA 1999 provides better market access.

The Government of Canada assessed information on 10 new substances reported to the New Substances Program and determined that they meet the necessary criteria for their addition to the DSL. Under CEPA 1999, the Minister of the Environment must add a substance to the DSL within 120 days after the criteria listed in section 87 or 112 have been met.

Background

The DSL is a list of substances that are considered “existing” in Canada for the purposes of CEPA 1999. “New” substances are not on the DSL and are subject to notification and assessment requirements before they can be manufactured in or imported into Canada. These requirements are set out in subsections 81(1) and 106(1) of CEPA 1999, as well as in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms).

The DSL was published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in May 1994. (see footnote 2) The DSL is amended 10 times a year, on average; these amendments may add or remove substances, or make corrections to the DSL.

A substance must be added to the DSL under subsections 87(1) or (5) of CEPA 1999 within 120 days once all of the following conditions are met:

  • the Minister of the Environment has been provided with information regarding the substance; (see footnote 3)
  • the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are satisfied that the substance has already been manufactured in or imported into Canada under the conditions set out in section 87 of CEPA 1999 by the person who provided the information;
  • the period prescribed for the assessment of the submitted information for the substance has expired; and
  • the substance is not subject to any conditions imposed on its import or manufacture.

Environment Canada and Health Canada assessed information on 10 new substances reported to the New Substances Program and determined that they meet the necessary criteria for their addition to the DSL.

Objectives

The objectives of the Order 2015-87-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List (the Order) are to comply with the requirements under CEPA 1999 and facilitate access to and use of 10 substances by removing reporting requirements under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) associated with their import or manufacture.

Description

The Order adds 10 substances to the DSL. To protect confidential business information, 7 of the 10 substances will have masked chemical names. Masked names are allowed by CEPA 1999 if the publication of the explicit chemical or biological name of a substance would result in the release of confidential business information. The procedure to be followed for creating a masked name is set out in the Masked Name Regulations under CEPA 1999. Substances with a masked name are added under the confidential portion of the DSL. Anyone who wishes to determine if a substance is on the confidential portion of the DSL must file a Notice of Bona Fide Intent to Manufacture or Import with the New Substances Program.

“One-for-One” Rule and small business lens

The Order does not trigger the “One-for-One” Rule, as it does not add any additional costs to business. Also, the small business lens does not apply to the Order, as it does not add any administrative or compliance burden to small businesses.

Consultation

As the Order is administrative in nature and does not contain any information that would be subject to comment or objection by the general public, no consultation is required.

Rationale

Ten substances have met the necessary conditions for addition to the DSL. The Order adds these substances to the DSL, which facilitates market access by exempting them from assessment and reporting requirements under subsection 81(1) of CEPA 1999.

The Order will benefit Canadians by enabling industry to use these substances in larger quantities. The Order will also benefit industry by reducing the administrative burden associated with the current regulatory status of these substances. As a result, it is expected that there will be no incremental costs to the public, industry or governments associated with the Order.

Implementation, enforcement and service standards

The DSL identifies substances that, for the purposes of CEPA 1999, are not subject to the requirements of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) or the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). As the Order only adds substances to the DSL, developing an implementation plan or a compliance strategy or establishing a service standard is not required.

Contact

Greg Carreau
Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement Division
Environment Canada
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Substances Management Information Line:
1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada)
819-938-3232 (outside of Canada)
Fax: 819-938-5212
Email: substances@ec.gc.ca

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote b
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote c
    SOR/2005-247
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 1
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote 2
    The Order 2001-87-04-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List (SOR/2001-214), published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in July 2001, establishes the structure of the Domestic Substances List. For more information, please visit http://publications.gc.ca/gazette/archives/p2/2001/2001-07-04/pdf/g2-13514.pdf.
  • Footnote 3
    The most comprehensive package, with information about the substances, depends on the class of a substance. The information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) under CEPA 1999.