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Registration

SOR/2016-17 February 10, 2016

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2016-87-03-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List

Whereas the Minister of the Environment has been provided with information under either paragraph 87(1)(a) or (5)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a) in respect of each substance referred to in the annexed Order;

Whereas, in respect of the substances being added to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b) pursuant to subsection 87(1) of that Act, the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are satisfied that those substances have been manufactured in or imported into Canada, by the person who provided the information, in excess of the quantity prescribed under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) (see footnote c);

Whereas the period for assessing the information under section 83 of that Act has expired;

And whereas no conditions under paragraph 84(1)(a) of that Act in respect of the substances are in effect;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote d), makes the annexed Order 2016-87-03-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, February 5, 2016

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2016-87-03-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List

Amendments

1 Part 1 of the Domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

  • 717-74-8 N
  • 24991-61-5 N-P
  • 25736-79-2 N-P
  • 87079-34-3 N-P
  • 246856-20-2 N-P
  • 1312012-68-2 N
  • 1373883-62-5 N-P
  • 1613372-94-3 N-P
  • 1793056-30-0 N-P

2 Part 3 of the List is amended by adding the following in numerical order:

17584-7 N

Benzene, polyalkene derivs., sulfonated, sodium salts

Dérivés polyalcéniques de benzène, sulfonatés, sels de sodium

18904-4 N-P

1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, polymer with 1,3-dihydro-1,3-dioxo-5-isobenzofurancarboxylic acid and 2,2-dialkyl-1,3-propanediol, C11-14-isoalkyl esters, C13-rich

Acide isophtalique polymérisé avec de l’acide 1,3-dihydro-1,3-dioxo-2-benzofurane-5-carboxylique et du 2,2-dialkylpropane-1,3-diol, mélange d’esters isoalkyliques en C11-14 riche en C13

18907-7 N-P

Oil derivative, ester with propoxylated substituted alkane amine

Dérivé d’huile, ester avec une alcanamine substituée et propoxylée

18908-8 N

Butanedioic acid, mono(mixed alken-1-yl and polyisobutylene) derivs., ethylene esters

Mélange de mono(alc-1-ényl ou polyisobutylène)butanedioates d’éthyle

18910-1 N-P

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, polymer with ethenylbenzene, 2-methylpropyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate and disubstituted alkane mono(2-methyl-2-propenoate), tert-Bu ethaneperoxoate-initiated

Méthacrylate de 2-hydroxyéthyle polymérisé avec du styrène, du méthacrylate de 2-méthylpropyle et du monométhacrylate d’alcane substitué, amorcé avec de l’éthaneperoxoate de tert-butyle

18911-2 N-P

Glycerin copolymer with oxirane and substituted fatty acid

Copolymère de propane-1,2,3-triol, d’oxirane et d’un acide gras substitué

18912-3 N-P

Propanoic acid, 3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methyl-, polymer with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine, haloalkyl heteromonocycle polymer with alkene poly carbomonocycle 2-propenoate and 1,1′-methylenebis[4-isocyanatocyclohexane], compd. with N,N-diethylethanamine

Acide 2,2-bis(hydroxyméthyl)propanoïque polymérisé avec de la benzène-1,3-diméthanamine, un halogénoalkyl(hétéromonocycle) polymérisé avec un acrylate d’alcènediylpolycarbomonocycle et du 1,1′-méthylènebis[4-isocyanatocyclohexane], composés avec la N,N-diéthyléthanamine

18914-5 N-P

Siloxanes and silicones, cetyl Me, Me alkyl, Me 2-phenylpropyl

Poly[oxy(hexadécyl(méthyl)silyl)-oxy(méthyl(alkyl)silyl)-oxy(méthyl(2-phénylpropyl)silyle)]

18915-6 N-P

Soybean oil, polymer with azelaic acid, benzoic acid, glycerol and substituted heteropolycycle

Huile de soja polymérisée avec de l’acide nonanedioïque, de l’acide benzoïque, du propane-1,2,3-triol et un hétéropolycycle substitué

18916-7 N-P

2-Propenoic acid, polymer with 2,5-furandione and 2-propene derivative, sodium salt, peroxydisulfuric acid ([(HO)S(O)2]2O2) sodium salt (1:2)-initiated

Acide acrylique polymérisé avec de la furane-2,5-dione et un dérivé du prop-2-ène, sel de sodium, amorcé avec du peroxydisulfate ([(HO)S(O)2]2O2) de sodium (1/2)

18917-8 N-P

Fatty acids, unsaturated, polymers with fatty esters, alkyl anhydride and polyalkyl diol

Acides gras insaturés polymérisés avec des esters d’acide gras, un anhydride alkylique et un poly(alcanediol)

18918-0 N-P

2,5-Furandione, telomer with alkenylbenzene and (alkylalkyl)benzene, potassium salt

Furane-2,5-dione télomérisée avec un alcénylbenzène et un (alkylalkyl)benzène, sel de potassium

18919-1 N-P

Hexanedioic acid, polymer with cyclohexyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxobutyl)-2-propenamide, 1,6-hexanediol, α-hydro-ω-hydroxypoly[oxy-1,4-butanediyl], 3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxyalkyl)-2-methylpropanoic acid, 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3,3-trimethylcyclohexane and methyl 2-methyl-propenoate, tert-Bu hydroperoxide-initiated, compds. with triethylamine

Acide hexanedioïque polymérisé avec du méthacrylate de cyclohexyle, du N-(2-méthyl-4-oxopentane-2-yl)acrylamide, de l’hexane-1,6-diol, de l’α-hydro-ω-hydroxypoly[oxybutane-1,4-diyle], de l’acide 3-hydroxy-2-hydroxyalkyl-2-méthylpropanoïque, du 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatométhyl)-1,3,3-triméthylcyclohexane et du méthacrylate de méthyle, amorcé avec de l’hydroperoxyde de tert-butyle, composés avec la N,N-diéthyléthanamine

18920-2 N-P

Oxirane, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, monoester with α-[[[3-(carboxyamino)methylphenyl]amino]carbonyl]-ω-alkoxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), alkylalkyl ether

Méthyloxirane polymérisé avec de l’oxirane, monoester avec l’α-[[[3-(carboxyamino)méthylphényl]amino]carbonyl]-ω-alcoxypoly(oxyéthane-1,2-diyle), oxyde alkylalkylique

Coming into Force

3 This Order comes into force on the day on which it is registered.

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Order.)

Issues

Canadians depend on substances that are used in hundreds of goods, from medicines to computers, fabric and fuels. Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), substances (i.e. chemicals, polymers, nanomaterials and living organisms) “new” to Canada are subject to reporting requirements before they can be manufactured or imported. This limits market access until human health and environmental impacts associated with the new substances are assessed and managed where appropriate.

The Government of Canada assessed information on 23 new substances reported to the New Substances Program and determined that they meet the necessary criteria for their addition to the Domestic Substances List (DSL). These substances have therefore been added to the DSL.

Background

“New” substances are not on the DSL and are subject to notification and assessment requirements before they can be manufactured in or imported into Canada. The notification and assessment requirements are set out in subsections 81(1) and 106(1) of CEPA 1999 as well as in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). These requirements do not apply to substances listed on the DSL, as these substances are considered “existing” in Canada for the purposes of CEPA 1999.

The DSL was published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in May 1994 (see footnote 2) and is amended on average 10 times a year. These amendments may add or remove substances or make corrections to the DSL.

A substance must be added to the DSL under subsections 87(1) or (5) of CEPA 1999 within 120 days once all of the following conditions are met:

  • the Minister of the Environment has been provided with information regarding the substance; (see footnote 3)
  • the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health are satisfied that the substance has already been manufactured in or imported into Canada under the conditions set out in section 87 of CEPA 1999 by the person who provided the information;
  • the period prescribed for the assessment of the submitted information for the substance has expired; and
  • the substance is not subject to any conditions imposed pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of CEPA 1999 on its import or manufacture.

Environment Canada and Health Canada assessed information on 23 new substances reported to the New Substances Program and determined that they meet the criteria for addition to the DSL.

Objectives

The objective of the Order 2016-87-03-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List (the Order) is to comply with the requirements under subsections 87(1) and (5) of CEPA 1999 by adding 23 substances to the DSL. These substances are therefore no longer subject to the notification and assessment requirements under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Description

The Order adds 23 substances to the DSL. To protect confidential business information, 14 of the 23 substances have masked chemical names. Masked names are allowed by CEPA 1999 if the publication of the explicit chemical or biological name of a substance would result in the release of confidential business information. The procedure to be followed for creating a masked name is set out in the Masked Name Regulations under CEPA 1999. Substances with a masked name are added under the confidential portion of the DSL. Anyone who wishes to determine if a substance is on the confidential portion of the DSL must file a Notice of Bona Fide Intent to Manufacture or Import with the New Substances Program.

“One-for-One” Rule and small business lens

The Order does not trigger the “One-for-One” Rule, as it does not add any additional costs to business. Also, the small business lens does not apply to the Order, as it does not add any administrative or compliance burden to small businesses.

Consultation

As the Order does not contain any information expected to generate comments or objections by stakeholders, no consultation is deemed necessary.

Rationale

Twenty-three substances have met the conditions for addition to the DSL. The Order adds these substances to the DSL and exempts them from the notification and assessment requirements under subsection 81(1) of CEPA 1999.

The Order will benefit Canadians by enabling industry to have better access to larger quantities of these substances, which is expected to reduce costs associated with uses of these substances in products consumed by Canadians. The Order will also benefit industry by removing the cost associated with regulatory requirements for “new” substances. As a result, it is expected that there will be no incremental costs to the public, industry or governments associated with the Order.

Implementation, enforcement and service standards

The DSL identifies substances that, for the purposes of CEPA 1999, are not subject to the requirements of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) or the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). Developing an implementation plan and a compliance strategy or establishing a service standard is not required when adding substances to the DSL.

Contact

Greg Carreau
Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement Division
Environment Canada
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Substances Management Information Line:
1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada)
819-938-3232 (outside of Canada)
Fax: 819-938-5212
Email: ec.substances.ec@canada.ca

  • Footnote a
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote b
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote c
    SOR/2005-247
  • Footnote d
    S.C. 1999, c. 33
  • Footnote 1
    SOR/94-311
  • Footnote 2
    The Order 2001-87-04-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List (SOR/2001-214), published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in July 2001, establishes the structure of the Domestic Substances List. For more information, please visit http://publications.gc.ca/gazette/archives/p2/2001/2001-07-04/pdf/g2-13514.pdf.
  • Footnote 3
    The most comprehensive package, with information about the substances, depends on the class of a substance. The information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) under CEPA 1999.